Resources

Sell Something You Don’t Need Online

It goes without saying, but the internet offers a wealth of ways to sell your stuff and pocket some cash. You can sell just about anything: clothes, toys, furniture, books, DVDs, records, electronics, art, gifts you don’t want–really there’s always somebody out there willing to buy something you have. Craigslist and Ebay are the leaders in this arena. Tons of people have made a pretty penny and even rely on selling on these sites for their main source of income. Sign up, open an account and start selling!

Do Odd Jobs

Offering your services to do odd jobs in your neighborhood can really pay off. There’s a variety of jobs that people are willing to pay for: babysitting, dog-walking, lawn-mowing, hedge-trimming, house-sitting, gardening, house cleaning and de-cluttering, cleaning out a garage can put quick cash in your pocket. Another service that can pay off is offering to run errands for your neighbors. People are so busy these days, so running to the cleaners or buying groceries can be really valuable to people feeling a time crunch. Helping with chores is another service busy people are willing to pay for.

Make Stuff & Sell It — Get Creative

Turn Your Hobbies Into Income. If your family and friends rave about the stuff you make then you may be on to something. Nowadays, there’s not only a market for crafts but there are numerous ways to turn them into cash. If you are creative, then you can really capitalize on your skills. One of the best known sites is Etsy.com, which gives artists the opportunity to sell items at a fair price. You can sell everything from gift baskets, food, clothes, to art to a wide audience. Creative types are selling custom greeting cards, holiday or seasonal items, candy bouquets — you name it. And eventually, can get your own Etsy-connected site for a very minimal fee. You can also go the local route and sell your wares at your neighborhood farmers or flea market.

Use Your Car

Rent your car. Try renting your car to friend when you don’t need it. Drive people to the airport or station. People always need a ride to the airport or train station. Spread the word that you’re available to do it a cheaper rate than cabs or car service.

Become Your Own Boss

Become an Event Planner. If you have a knack for organization and attention to detail and enjoy parties, why not try your hand at event planning? You can help people plan weddings, birthday parties, anniversaries, kids parties, Sweet 16s, Bar Mitzvahs –really any special occasion. Start by offering a rate lower than the seasoned competition, put together an outline, list of vendors and services, get some business cards and circulate them at stores, venues and among people that can help you get your foot in the door. Set Up Your Own Online Store. You can sell custom hats, t-shirts, mugs and anything else that you can order in bulk and reproduce cheaply. Become a Personal Assistant. Start by offering your services and skills for free or reduced rate to busy, overwhelmed people, the elderly or handicapped. Let them start spreading the word and before you know it you’ll have people seeking out your services.

Spread Your Knowledge — Teach Something

Become a Tutor. Are you good at something that people are willing to pay for? Then chances are you can become a tutor. Math, Grammar, and Science are just a few of the in-demand subjects frustrated parents and kids need help with. Put up some postings, give out flyers at the library, supermarkets, campuses and school functions and start building your clientele. Share Your Knowledge/Expertise. Adults are willing to pay for expertise as well. If you’re knowledgeable in a musical instrument, yoga, cooking, fitness, dance, dog training– you name it, someone out there will want to pay you for your assistance, especially if you offer lower rates and a more flexible schedule than local facilities. Teach a language. You can post flyers offering instruction in a language. You can also go the high-tech route and offer lessons via Skype. Search Google to see who’s looking for practice in your native tongue. Many people will pay to have conversations via Skype with someone fluent in the language they want to learn. Then set up regular lessons and payment via PayPal.

Use Your Kitchen

Have A Bake Sale. If people love your cookies or pies, then you have a customer base out there willing to pay for your baked goodies. People miss homemade desserts like oatmeal raisin cookies, apple pie, banana bread or chocolate cake. So, if you can turn out some delicious baked goodies you’ll be sure to make some nice change. You can sell at your local farmers’ market, have your own bake sale or maybe your local grocery store will let you do a demo and sell your baked goods. Cook for People. Can you roast a mean chicken? Does your lasagna garner bravos? Then you can turn your cooking skills into profit. It’s no secret that a lot of people don’t like or have the time to cook for themselves these days. Which opens the door for enterprising home cooks. You would do the shopping, cook and sometimes package and freeze the food for others to enjoy. You can prepare meals for busy families, single people, the elderly or people who want to do something for special occasions. Only do this if you can really cook and have a few dishes and specialties up your sleeve that would be in demand.

From Your Computer

Get Paid to Surf. Check out Volition.com for a list of companies that will pay you to do online activities ranging from web searches, reading e-mails, just to name a few. Sign up with several companies and start making your time online pay off. Offer computer services on Odesk.com. You can do IT work, writing for blogs, Graphic Work, Programming, or just about anything over the internet on Odesk.com. You can make some quick cash via this site. Part time/Freelance work. There are many websites like elance.com and guru.com to find part time work. Post your resume for the numerous Designer, Writer, Programmer, Blogger, among a variety of other jobs. Write for A Site. You can write and submit endless articles to eHow — the leading articles directory, and generate money when someone visits your articles and clicks the ads. You can write as many articles as you want and receive money when someone visits your articles and clicks the ads. Yahoo Voices and helium.comare other sites to try. Sell your photos. Stock photo websites like istockphoto can really pad your wallet. There are people generating income in the high six figures from the site. Join A Focus Group. There are companies out there that want your opinion on products and services and are willing to pay for it. Monitor your local listings or check out findfocusgroups.com for tons of legitimate listings of paid focus groups. You can search from nationwide focus groups that take place over the phone or online or search locally by city or state. Make sure to check regularly, as up to 50 new listings go up daily, with the majority posting on Mondays.

Direct Selling

There’s more than Avon and Mary Kay out there these days. If you refer new clients, many companies will share a portion of their revenue. You can go door to door, host parties or do product demonstrations for friends, family and associates. There’s a wide range of companies to check out: Stella Dot JewelryWine Shop at HomeTastefully Simple — gourmet food and desserts, Simply Fun — games for kids, just to name a few.

Miscellaneous

Take In a Boarder. Do you have a spare room? Then you could offer it to someone and earn extra income. Place an ad in your local paper or post online with your specifications. Make sure they are gainfully employed, check references, and Google them to safeguard yourself. Sign Up for Medical Tests. Search online for hospitals doing clinical tests and apply for consideration. This won’t make you rich, but the extra cash can come in handy when you need it. Hold a Yard/Garage Sale. Before Craigslist or Ebay, there was the good old garage sale. Make a few signs, post them in your neighborhood and tell your friends you have to stuff to sell.

Resources

Search the internet classifieds for your area or your local newspaper to find quick gigs like babysitting, mowing, dog walking, or moving work. Amazon Mechanical Turk, a reputable site where companies seek people to perform tasks machines cannot easily do, but people are able to. You choose an assignment and upon completion are given credit with payment to your Amazon account that can be withdrawn once you accumulate $10.
Khan Academy — Non-profit educational website covering everything from math to physics, finance, and history and hundreds of skills to practice Open Yale Courses — Provides free and open access to a selection of introductory courses taught by Yale University distinguished teachers and scholars. University of the People — The World’s 1st Tuition-free online university Openculture.com — Free cultural & educational media MIT Opencourseware — More than 2,000 free of charge courses available and materials used in the teaching of almost all of MIT’s subjects available online Open University, Learning Space EdXonline.org — open online course platform founded by Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University to offer online university-level courses Connexions — CNX.org is an open-content library of course materials developed by Rice University. SOFIA (Sharing of Free Intellectual Assets) — Freely accessible community college-level (first two years of undergraduate curriculum) course materials Wikiversity — From the creators of Wikipedia, online community devoted to learning resources, learning projects and research for use in all levels, types, and styles of education from pre-school to university, including professional training and informal learning Carnegie Mellon Open Learning — Offers online courses to anyone who wants to learn or teach University of California – Berkeley — Berkeley offers podcasts and webcasts of amazing professors lecturing. Stanford University — iTunes U Tufts Opencourseware — Free and open educational resource for faculty, students, and self-learners around the world. Johns Hopkins Opencourseware — Provides free and open access to a selection of courses Saylor.org — Free and open collection of college level courses where you can earn a certificate upon completion of each course. Coursera.org — Free online courses from over 33 universities ALISON — An Ireland-based company, which stands for Advance Learning Interactive Systems Online–provides free online courses in job-friendly skills. ALISON focuses on the practical, with free a range of courses to upgrade anyone’s employment skills. Un- or under-employed people can get help planning their career path with a course that takes from 1-2 hours. GCFLearnFree — Creates and provides quality, innovative online learning opportunities to anyone who wants to improve the technology, literacy and math skills needed to be successful in both work and life. By delivering over 750 different lessons to millions of people in over 200 countries and territories absolutely free, GCFLearnFree.org is a worldwide leader in online education.

Learn Languages for Free

BBC Languages — Online multimedia learning resources in Spanish, German, French and Italian. Learn languages with lessons, courses, audio, video and games, including the alphabet, phrases, vocabulary, pronunciation, grammar, activities and tests. Learn A Language — Learn a Language with free online language lessons, interactive games, and fun lessons. Learn up to 8 foreign languages with Visual Link Languages Busuu — A free online community for learning languages. Connect for free with native speakers worldwide LiveMocha — Fun, effective language learning for all types of learners. Duolingo — Learn languages completely free, without ads or hidden charges.

Websites for Free Job Skills Training Online

Microsoft® Word:

Baycon Group — Great tutorials for Microsoft® Word. Even beginners can learn quickly. In addition to Microsoft® Word, the site also offers other tutorials like Excel Basics, PowerPoint Basics, Windows Vista Tutorial, Windows XP Tutorial, Windows 98 Tutorial, Scalable SQL Tutorial, Paint Shop Pro, Flash, Photoshop and more. This site is highly recommended and it’s free.

Microsoft® Excel:

University of South Dakota — Covers all the technical aspects of Microsoft® Excel including concepts from the basics; like explaining spreadsheets, columns, rows, and cells; to the advanced concepts like Excel spreadsheet formulas. It’s a great starting point for beginners.

Microsoft® PowerPoint:

Florida Gulf Coast University — Fantastic website for beginners’ tutorials in Microsoft® PowerPoint. In addition to PowerPoint, there are tutorials on Word and Excel. The site also offers skills assessment tests that you can use to determine your level of technical skills knowledge.

Microsoft® Publisher:

Learnthat — Publisher tutorials cover the crucial concepts of Microsoft® Publisher beginning with the fundamentals. The tutorials are presented with effective images and illustrations for better understanding.

Microsoft® Visio:

Office.com — Tutorials that cover almost everything in Visio from mastering the shapes to linking data to the shapes. One of, if not the best, Microsoft® Visio resources.

Microsoft® Project:

Profsr.com — Excellent tutorials that cover topics like the basics of project management, regulations for effective project management, defining the project in Microsoft® Project, ways of managing the project resources and much more.

Adobe Photoshop:

About.com — Collection of tutorials and resources for learning Adobe Photoshop online. These About.com tutorials present Photoshop concepts in a clear and concise manner with the use of appropriate images for easy learning.

Adobe Illustrator:

biorust — Extensive tutorial website providing resources not only on using Adobe illustrator but also other tools for graphic design. The presentation is so simple, that even graphic design novices can learn quickly. Also available are the online Illustrator video tutorials hosted by Adobe, but the instructor moves quickly. To learn at your own speed, stick with Biorust.com.

Adobe Flash

Techi Warehouse — Excellent flash tutorials for beginner flash developers. The tutorial starts off describing the different kinds of tools used and then it moves on to higher concepts such as Flash tweening and more. Highlights of this tutorial include crisp clear screen shots used to describe the software.

HTML:

HTML Made Easy — A great collection of tutorials and resources on HTML. This site provides information on the basics of HTML with easy to understand examples. The tutorial is explained starting with the basics like Tags and Paragraphs, and ends with advanced HTML concepts such as Frames and Tables.
Here are some of the best ways to find free/cheap stuff:
  • GrouponLivingSocialThefreeSite.comStartSampling, and Free Stuff Channel: Websites dedicated to helping users find giveaways, services, perks, samples, trials, and other promotional items.
  • Kids Meal Deals: Search kids meal deals and kids eat free restaurants in your area using their search tool.
  • Sweet Free Stuff: Daily updated blog of real free stuff, free samples, coupons, deals and more. All 100% free of charge.
  • Totally Free Stuff: Directory of freebies online includes free posters, software, t-shirts, mouse pads, clothing, hats, food samples, and more.
  • MyOpenBar.com: Find free (or cheap) drinks in New York, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Chicago, Honolulu, and Miami.
  • Craigslist: Check out category dedicated to “free stuff” for each of its participating cities. Find everything from furniture to electronics to clothes.
  • Freecycle and other reuse groups: Search listings of items being given away by people in your area.
  • CouchSurfing: Connects travelers with hosts around the globe. You get both a free place to stay and locals to hang out with for an inside glimpse of other cultures.
  • DigsvilleHome Base HolidaysHomeExchange.com, and HomeLink: Free accommodations while travelling. Use to find traditional home-exchange opportunities.
  • Favorpals: Trading skills and favors – barter style. Clean someone’s house in exchange for dog walking when you’re at work or for tutoring your kid in math. Or offer painting services and get help with designing a website.
  • U-Exchange: Trade anything from babysitting and calligraphy lessons to pianos and foosball tables to cars and boats.
  • Swap.com: Swap books, music, DVDs, or video games via mail through. Print a postage label right from your computer for easy mailing.
  • Swapstyle: Trade clothes, accessories, shoes, and even cosmetics.
  • Freegrabber: Free stuff, free samples, freebies, Walmart samples, beauty samples, household samples free coupons, hot deals.

10 Upgrade Tips

  1. Participate in a Frequent Flier program
  2. Talk to the right people — from the agent on the phone to the desk agent and be polite. Be personable, pleasant or share information or even a nightmare experience which may get you a sympathetic upgrade.
  3. Several airlines offer upgrades for a small fee. You can pay a little extra the day of the flight and work out a deal the agent at the gate.
  4. Secret Codes — Most airlines have economy fare codes that are automatically upgradeable — but there are a few catches. First, these codes are for fully refundable coach fares (look for Y or M class) and the automatic upgrades all depend on what seating is available in first class when the ticket is purchased. In addition, these fares are generally not offered on direct flights, and are best booked directly through an agent or the airline — not online.
  5. Family and Friends — Almost anyone who works for particular airline, a supplier or a contractor may have access to upgrades and/or the right people to get you bumped into first. The key here is having a solid connection with someone — not just a casual relationship — and asking well in advance of your departure.
  6. Book the Package — Check vacation package pricing; many airlines now offer first-class fares as part of the packages, and the savings can be considerable. If you only need or want the flight and not the rental car or hotel part of the package, then don’t use the other package amenities. There are no penalties for being a no-show since the vendors are paid no matter what.
  7. Make an Impression — Manners matter and dressing nicely can get you in first class. Your appearance and behavior at the gate can make all the difference when it comes to calling a name on the upgrade list; obnoxious and pushy almost always loses out to polite and patient. Rude passengers will not curry favors with airlines staff.
  8. Be Significant — Are you in charge of booking your company’s upcoming trips? Or maybe you’re the assistant to a VIP-decision maker in charge of travel, or you’ve got a cast on your leg from a ski accident. Then be sure to mention your special stature to your travel agent when booking, and – if appropriate — ask them to add an OSI note to your reservation. That’s a way the agent can get a message to the airline that you’re either important, in need of some special help, or have a circumstance that’s notable – and might just get you bumped to first.
  9. Get Some Credit — Linking your airline frequent flier number to hotel, car rental and other travel loyalty programs is a fast way to earn mileage — which can then be used for upgrades and other travel perks. Also do some research on the credit cards offered through carriers for bonus mileage opportunities; while we are not encouraging you to go into debt, this is an excellent way to earn points for everyday purchases like business expenses that your company reimburses you for.
  10. Company Travel — As a passenger on business you are still eligible to take advantage of frequent flier programs. So, be sure to ask that your number is included on every flight. You’ll soon find yourself in mile-high territory, mileage-wise, and that’s when the upgrades come automatically.
  11. Sign up for newsletters and e-mail alerts from airlines that serve the routes you’re shopping for, and from sites like AirfareWatchdog, JohnnyJet, Farecast and others, including FareCompare, Kayak, Orbitz and Travelocity. Many airlines post their best fares only on their own Web sites, including Southwest, Allegiant Air, SAS, Aloha, Aer Lingus, Qantas, Alaska, Air New Zealand and JetBlue.
Managing your finances is really challenging especially in the age of sky-high demands for both your money and your time. However, despite these demands, it is important to know how to budget money to secure financial stability for you and your family. If the entire process seems too tedious or complex for you, then here are 5 easy ways to budget your money to secure a safe financial future.

Record Your Income & Track the Expenses:

You have to record the exact amount you are earning. It’s the most basic step for money management and you have to count every income stream coming into your accounts, including your salary and any additional income. The next step is to track the expenses. You must keep account of every day to day expense including your daily trip to Starbucks. Recording your expenses all you to check how far your expenses meet or exceed your income. There are budget worksheets available with rows and cells where you can keep account of your earnings and regular expenses. These budget worksheets can be found both in the Excel spreadsheet and in pencil & paper formats too.

Set the Priorities:

Now, make a list of your necessary and indispensable expenses and a list of the not-so-vital luxuries like spa treatments or dining out. Your actual task would be to allot your earnings primarily for the basic priorities like groceries, monthly medical checkups, tuition fees, car maintenance and so on. Then, if the budget allows, allot some of the remaining money for your luxuries but never go over your budget.

Save money:

Find out the discount sales and rebates to save money as much as possible. Try to conduct your shopping affairs from online stores only as the online shopping charges are lesser compared to land based stores.

Budgeting Coach:

You can also consider consulting a good budgeting coach too. These are seasoned financial experts who provide effective advice on budget management for a nominal fee. The budgeting coaches can really help you out if you are too confused with your needs versus wants, earnings, assets, expenses and debts. These coaches are well aware of the money matters and offer budget consultation packages for 1 hour to 4 hours which you can select based on your needs.

Personal Finance book:

There are personal finance book materials written by money-management experts which also provide an easy to understand budgeting program for everybody that helps a lot in understanding the money monitoring effectively.
Administration for Children and Families http://www.acf.hhs.gov/ Responsible for federal programs which promote the economic and social well-being of families, children, individuals, and communities.

CHILD CARE

Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/occ State child care assistance programs are funded through the Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF). CCDF is a Federal program that assists low-income families, families receiving Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), and those transitioning from TANF in getting child care so they can work or attend training/education. Each State has its own eligibility guidelines. Child Care Assistance Program (CCAP) www.dss.state.la.us › Child Development and Early Learning The Child Care Assistance Program helps low-income families pay for child care while working or attending school or training. Child Care Aware of America http://childcareaware.org/ http://childcareaware.org/parents-and-guardians/child-care-101 Child Care Aware of America works with more than 600 state and local Child Resources and Referral agencies nationwide to help ensure that all families in the United States have access to quality, affordable child care. To achieve its mission, Child Care Aware of America leads projects that increase the quality and availability of child care, undertakes research, and advocates for child care policies that improve the lives of children and families. Child Care Federal Resources http://childcare.gov/xhtml/links/g_3/t_33.html The ChildCare.gov Web site provides links to Federal resources with information for child care providers about providing care for children with special needs. Child Care Resource and Referral (CCR&R) www.naccrra.org/ Child care resource and referral (CCR&R) agencies sometimes have information about child care programs that have scholarships, special funding options, or sliding fee scales that are based on household income. HHS Child Care http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/occ This program assists low-income families, families receiving temporary public assistance, and those transitioning from public assistance in obtaining child care so they can work or attend training/education.

CHILD SUPPORT & CUSTODY

Office of Child Support & Enforcement http://transition.acf.hhs.gov/programs/css/resource/state-and-tribal-child-support-agency-contacts Child support enforcement (CSE) agencies can help single parents, and family members with legal custody of children, locate an absent parent, establish paternity, and collect child support monies. Your State CSE agency can help answer questions about child support and child custody laws in your State The Child Custody Network www.childcustody.org/ The Child Custody Network is an organization that links families with resources and information about laws, research, discussion boards, and forums about child custody issues. Child Support Resources ChildSupport.Com Child Support Guidelines http://supportguidelines.com/ NationalChildSupport.com www.nationalchildsupport.com/ The Association for Children for Enforcement of Support http://www.childsupport-aces.org/index2.shtml Child Support Calculator http://www.alllaw.com/calculators/childsupport/%20

EDUCATION

Early Head Start (EHS) www.ehsnrc.org/ 866-763-6481 EHS is a federally funded, community-based program for low-income families with infants, toddlers, and pregnant women. It offers children and families comprehensive child development services through center-based programs, home-visiting programs, and a combination of program options. Head Start http://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov/hslc 866-763-6481 Head Start is a federally funded, community-based child development program for children 3 to 5 years old and their families. It is a child-focused program and has the overall goal of increasing the school readiness of young children from low-income families. Head Start serves children whose family income is at or below the Federal Poverty Income Guidelines. Like EHS, Head Start programs may serve a limited number of children from families who earn more than this income limit. State-funded prekindergarten programs: Child Care Resource and Referral (CCR&R) www.naccrra.org/ Some States have prekindergarten programs that are designed to give 3- and 4-year-old children the experiences they need to be ready for kindergarten. These programs usually last 2 1/2 to 6 hours of a school day. To find out if there is a program in your area and whether you are eligible to participate, contact your local CCR&R agency.

HEALTH/MEDICAL CARE

Insure Kids Now http://www.insurekidsnow.gov/state/ Children or teens may qualify for no-cost or low-cost health insurance coverage through Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP). Many parents may also be eligible. Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) http://www.insurekidsnow.gov/chip/index.html 1-877 KIDS NOW (1-877-543-7669) The Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) provides free or low-cost health coverage for more than 7 million children up to age 19. CHIP covers U.S. citizens and eligible immigrants.

NATIONAL & MULTI-CITY

United Way 1-800-725-5314 United Way provides free services to people throughout the nation. Staff will talk with you over the phone and provide job information and job referrals. United Way also works with agencies that provide job counseling, job training, and emergency food, and housing, and shelter. The Intersect Fund http://intersectfund.org/section/for/7 The Intersect Fund helps working people build strong businesses. As any entrepreneur knows, perfecting your product or service is only half the battle. The tough parts come next: finding customers, managing cash flow, getting financing, and standing out in a crowded marketplace. We help you emphasize your strengths and overcome your weaknesses to grow a profitable, satisfying, and socially responsible business. Services include: action steps-coaching to help you get things done in your business, loans from $500 -20,000. Modest Needs https://www.modestneeds.org/index.asp Modest Needs is an award-winning public charity, which since 2002 has stopped the cycle of poverty before it starts for 11,200 hard-working individuals, low-income workers and families. They promote the self-sufficiency of low-income workers by helping them to afford short-term, emergency expenses. Operation HOPE www.operationhope.org/ http://www.operationhope.org/programs A network of community centers providing financial resources, classes and counseling in underserved neighborhoods. Operation HOPE gives people the dignity, resources and the opportunity to achieve a level of self-determination in their lives. With 2 million clients served, 20,000 HOPE Corps volunteers, and more than $1.5 billion in private capital directed into America’s low wealth and underserved communities, creating thousands of homeowners, small business owners and entrepreneurs over the past 20 years. Their mission is to make free enterprise and capitalism work for all.

ARIZONA

JVS – Arizona Phone: 602-452-4660 www.jfcsaz.org JVS is a nonprofit, community-based health and human service organization, delivering a wide array of personalized services on a nonsectarian basis offers hope and opportunity to a diverse community through job training, education and expert career guidance, transforming lives and empowering individuals to achieve dignity and independence.

CALIFORNIA

Center for Employment Opportunities (CEO) – Oakland 510-251-2240 http://ceoworks.org/our-offices/oakland/ http://ceoworks.org/ The Center for Employment Opportunities (CEO) is dedicated to providing immediate, effective and comprehensive employment services to men and women with recent criminal convictions in New York. Our highly structured and tightly supervised programs help participants regain the skills and confidence needed for a successful transition to a stable, productive life. Center for Employment Opportunities (CEO) – San Diego (619) 684-4810 http://ceoworks.org/our-offices/california/san-diego/ http://ceoworks.org/ The Center for Employment Opportunities (CEO) is dedicated to providing immediate, effective and comprehensive employment services to men and women with recent criminal convictions in New York. Our highly structured and tightly supervised programs help participants regain the skills and confidence needed for a successful transition to a stable, productive life. Homeboy Industries http://www.homeboyindustries.org/ Homeboy Industries provides hope, training, and support to high-risk, formerly gang-involved and previously incarcerated men and women in Los Angeles. This program allows its members to redirect their paths, provides a continuum of free services and programs, and operates seven social enterprises that serve as job-training sites. Homeboy Industries is recognized as the largest gang intervention and re-entry program in the county, and has become a national model. HOPE – Financial Dignity Center Oakland/Bay Area 510-535-6700 510-535-6704 www.operationhope.org/ http://www.operationhope.org/programs A network of community centers providing financial resources, classes and counseling in underserved neighborhoods. Operation HOPE gives people the dignity, resources and the opportunity to achieve a level of self-determination in their lives. With 2 million clients served, 20,000 HOPE Corps volunteers, and more than $1.5 billion in private capital directed into America’s low wealth and underserved communities, creating thousands of homeowners, small business owners and entrepreneurs over the past 20 years. Their mission is to make free enterprise and capitalism work for all. HOPE -Banking on Our Future Oakland/Bay Area 510-535-6700 510-535-6704 www.operationhope.org/ http://www.operationhope.org/programs A network of community centers providing financial resources, classes and counseling in underserved neighborhoods. Operation HOPE gives people the dignity, resources and the opportunity to achieve a level of self-determination in their lives. With 2 million clients served, 20,000 HOPE Corps volunteers, and more than $1.5 billion in private capital directed into America’s low wealth and underserved communities, creating thousands of homeowners, small business owners and entrepreneurs over the past 20 years. Their mission is to make free enterprise and capitalism work for all. HOPE – Financial Dignity Center Long Beach 562-218-5011 562-591-3269 www.operationhope.org/ http://www.operationhope.org/programs A network of community centers providing financial resources, classes and counseling in underserved neighborhoods. Operation HOPE gives people the dignity, resources and the opportunity to achieve a level of self-determination in their lives. With 2 million clients served, 20,000 HOPE Corps volunteers, and more than $1.5 billion in private capital directed into America’s low wealth and underserved communities, creating thousands of homeowners, small business owners and entrepreneurs over the past 20 years. Their mission is to make free enterprise and capitalism work for all. HOPE – National Call Center Poway 866-270-2583 866-545-8236 www.operationhope.org/ http://www.operationhope.org/programs A network of community centers providing financial resources, classes and counseling in underserved neighborhoods. Operation HOPE gives people the dignity, resources and the opportunity to achieve a level of self-determination in their lives. With 2 million clients served, 20,000 HOPE Corps volunteers, and more than $1.5 billion in private capital directed into America’s low wealth and underserved communities, creating thousands of homeowners, small business owners and entrepreneurs over the past 20 years. Their mission is to make free enterprise and capitalism work for all. JVS – Los Angeles 323-761-8888 www.jvsla.org JVS is a nonprofit, community-based health and human service organization, delivering a wide array of personalized services on a nonsectarian basis offers hope and opportunity to a diverse community through job training, education and expert career guidance, transforming lives and empowering individuals to achieve dignity and independence. JVS – San Francisco 415-391-3600 www.jvs.org JVS is a nonprofit, community-based health and human service organization, delivering a wide array of personalized services on a nonsectarian basis offers hope and opportunity to a diverse community through job training, education and expert career guidance, transforming lives and empowering individuals to achieve dignity and independence. Midnight Mission www.midnightmission.org/ The primary purpose of the Midnight Mission is to take the homeless off of LA and re-establish them again as useful and self-respecting citizens. They offer a bridge to self-sufficiency for homeless people through counseling, education, training and job placement, the 12-step approach to recovery and make available the necessities of life to homeless people: food, shelter, clothing, personal hygiene needs, and medical care. Second Chance 619-234-8888 http://www.secondchanceprogram.org/ Second Chance gets people off the streets in San Diego and into the workforce to become contributing members of society, improving public health, safety and financial stability.

COLORADO

HOPE – Banking on Our Future Denver 720-855-8741 720-855-8870 www.operationhope.org/ http://www.operationhope.org/programs A network of community centers providing financial resources, classes and counseling in underserved neighborhoods. Operation HOPE gives people the dignity, resources and the opportunity to achieve a level of self-determination in their lives. With 2 million clients served, 20,000 HOPE Corps volunteers, and more than $1.5 billion in private capital directed into America’s low wealth and underserved communities, creating thousands of homeowners, small business owners and entrepreneurs over the past 20 years. Their mission is to make free enterprise and capitalism work for all. JVS – Denver 303-623-0251 www.jewishfamilyservice.org JVS is a nonprofit, community-based health and human service organization, delivering a wide array of personalized services on a nonsectarian basis offers hope and opportunity to a diverse community through job training, education and expert career guidance, transforming lives and empowering individuals to achieve dignity and independence.

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

HOPE Center -Washington, DC 202-582-2212 202-582-6402 www.operationhope.org/ http://www.operationhope.org/programs A network of community centers providing financial resources, classes and counseling in underserved neighborhoods. Operation HOPE gives people the dignity, resources and the opportunity to achieve a level of self-determination in their lives. With 2 million clients served, 20,000 HOPE Corps volunteers, and more than $1.5 billion in private capital directed into America’s low wealth and underserved communities, creating thousands of homeowners, small business owners and entrepreneurs over the past 20 years. Their mission is to make free enterprise and capitalism work for all. HOPE Center Washington, D.C. (c/o E*TRADE) 703-236-4901 703-236-8728 www.operationhope.org/ http://www.operationhope.org/programs A network of community centers providing financial resources, classes and counseling in underserved neighborhoods. Operation HOPE gives people the dignity, resources and the opportunity to achieve a level of self-determination in their lives. With 2 million clients served, 20,000 HOPE Corps volunteers, and more than $1.5 billion in private capital directed into America’s low wealth and underserved communities, creating thousands of homeowners, small business owners and entrepreneurs over the past 20 years. Their mission is to make free enterprise and capitalism work for all. JVS – Washington, DC (301) 838-4200 www.jssa.org JVS is a nonprofit, community-based health and human service organization, delivering a wide array of personalized services on a nonsectarian basis offers hope and opportunity to a diverse community through job training, education and expert career guidance, transforming lives and empowering individuals to achieve dignity and independence.

FLORIDA

Boley Centers – St. Petersburg 727-821-4819 www.boleycenters.org/ Boley Centers offer a variety of programs and services to youth and homeless with vocational services including resume development, interviewing skills and finding jobs, GED preparation, job training for careers in green industries, and ongoing support. Faithful Home Services, Inc. 786-467-9935 http://fhsmiami.com/ FHS was established to give economically disadvantaged families in the Miami-Dade County area access to resources which are necessary for maintaining a safe and healthy home environment. It is their mission to locate homeowners who do not possess the finances or the technical expertise to otherwise overcome their situation without outside help and to make our resources available to them. To accomplish this, they have assembled a living network consisting of volunteers, sub-contractors and material suppliers willing to donate whatever time and/or materials are at their disposal to help others. HOPE Express Miami 305-416-1621 www.operationhope.org/ http://www.operationhope.org/programs A network of community centers providing financial resources, classes and counseling in underserved neighborhoods. Operation HOPE gives people the dignity, resources and the opportunity to achieve a level of self-determination in their lives. With 2 million clients served, 20,000 HOPE Corps volunteers, and more than $1.5 billion in private capital directed into America’s low wealth and underserved communities, creating thousands of homeowners, small business owners and entrepreneurs over the past 20 years. Their mission is to make free enterprise and capitalism work for all. JVS – Miami 305-899-1587 www.jcsfl.org JVS is a nonprofit, community-based health and human service organization, delivering a wide array of personalized services on a nonsectarian basis offers hope and opportunity to a diverse community through job training, education and expert career guidance, transforming lives and empowering individuals to achieve dignity and independence. JVS – Tampa 813-344-0200 www.tampabay-job-links.org JVS is a nonprofit, community-based health and human service organization, delivering a wide array of personalized services on a nonsectarian basis offers hope and opportunity to a diverse community through job training, education and expert career guidance, transforming lives and empowering individuals to achieve dignity and independence.

GEORGIA

Athens Business NOW 404-728-8600 Athens Business NOW is a program for individuals who are low to moderate income and want to start their own business. Coastal Georgia Homeless Shelter & Development Center 912-265-6011 http://www.wicprograms.org/li/ga_coastal-georgia-homeless-shelter-development-center Coastal Georgia Homeless Shelter & Development Center offers services such as Trade School programs, Computer literacy classes and GED prep classes for women who are 18 years of age and older and homeless. HOPE Center -Atlanta 404-228-0155 404-883-2948 www.operationhope.org/ http://www.operationhope.org/programs A network of community centers providing financial resources, classes and counseling in underserved neighborhoods. Operation HOPE gives people the dignity, resources and the opportunity to achieve a level of self-determination in their lives. With 2 million clients served, 20,000 HOPE Corps volunteers, and more than $1.5 billion in private capital directed into America’s low wealth and underserved communities, creating thousands of homeowners, small business owners and entrepreneurs over the past 20 years. Their mission is to make free enterprise and capitalism work for all. HOPE Financial Dignity Center Atlanta 404-228-0155 404-883-2948 www.operationhope.org/ http://www.operationhope.org/programs A network of community centers providing financial resources, classes and counseling in underserved neighborhoods. Operation HOPE gives people the dignity, resources and the opportunity to achieve a level of self-determination in their lives. With 2 million clients served, 20,000 HOPE Corps volunteers, and more than $1.5 billion in private capital directed into America’s low wealth and underserved communities, creating thousands of homeowners, small business owners and entrepreneurs over the past 20 years. Their mission is to make free enterprise and capitalism work for all. JVS – Atlanta 770-677-900 www.jfcs-atlanta.org JVS is a nonprofit, community-based health and human service organization, delivering a wide array of personalized services on a nonsectarian basis offers hope and opportunity to a diverse community through job training, education and expert career guidance, transforming lives and empowering individuals to achieve dignity and independence. Operation HOPE Atlanta 404-941-2919 404-941-2925 www.operationhope.org/ http://www.operationhope.org/programs A network of community centers providing financial resources, classes and counseling in underserved neighborhoods. Operation HOPE gives people the dignity, resources and the opportunity to achieve a level of self-determination in their lives. With 2 million clients served, 20,000 HOPE Corps volunteers, and more than $1.5 billion in private capital directed into America’s low wealth and underserved communities, creating thousands of homeowners, small business owners and entrepreneurs over the past 20 years. Their mission is to make free enterprise and capitalism work for all.

ILLINOIS

Association House of Chicago 773-276-0084 www.associationhouse.org/ Association House of Chicago provides free services to low-income people in Chicago. Programs include job placement for people who are at least 16 years old, job training in computers and health care professions, GED preparation, and bilingual classes in Spanish and English. Central States Service, Employment, and Redevelopment (SER) 773-221-8736 OR 773-227-3377 www.centralstatesser.org/ Central States Service, Employment, and Redevelopment (SER) provides free services for low-income people in Chicago. To qualify for the program, you must meet its income guidelines and have either a High School diploma or GED certificate. The agency offers training programs for medical office assistance, computerized accounting, automotive office assistance, and word processing. Chicago Commons Employment Training Center (“ETC”) 773-826-4280 www.chicagocommons.org/ Chicago Commons Employment Training Center (“ETC”) is a comprehensive community-based organization that provides free services to low-income residents of West Humboldt Park and surrounding communities. The agency offers on-sight case management, job placement, retention services, parenting classes, support-groups, and limited day care slots. It also has ESL, GED, and adult basic education classes. Louise Landow Health Clinic and First Defense Legal Aid (FDLA) is also located on site. Employment Project 773-832-4080 www.inspirationcorp.org/employment-services-pages-5.php The Employment Project provides free services to homeless people who live in the City of Chicago. To qualify for the program, you must be homeless. The program will teach you basic life skills and help you get a job and/or stable housing. HOPE Center (c/o United Way) – Chicago 312-575-2507 312-906-2287 www.operationhope.org/ http://www.operationhope.org/programs A network of community centers providing financial resources, classes and counseling in underserved neighborhoods. Operation HOPE gives people the dignity, resources and the opportunity to achieve a level of self-determination in their lives. With 2 million clients served, 20,000 HOPE Corps volunteers, and more than $1.5 billion in private capital directed into America’s low wealth and underserved communities, creating thousands of homeowners, small business owners and entrepreneurs over the past 20 years. Their mission is to make free enterprise and capitalism work for all. Inner Voice 312-666-2577 www.innervoicechicago.org/ Inner Voice provides free services to homeless and low-income people in Chicago. The program provides courses for basic office skills and a GED. JVS – Chicago 312-673-3400 www.jvschicago.org JVS is a nonprofit, community-based health and human service organization, delivering a wide array of personalized services on a nonsectarian basis offers hope and opportunity to a diverse community through job training, education and expert career guidance, transforming lives and empowering individuals to achieve dignity and independence.

KENTUCKY

JVS – Kentucky 502-452-6341 www.jfcslouisville.org JVS is a nonprofit, community-based health and human service organization, delivering a wide array of personalized services on a nonsectarian basis offers hope and opportunity to a diverse community through job training, education and expert career guidance, transforming lives and empowering individuals to achieve dignity and independence.

LOUISIANA

HOPE -New Orleans 504-309-6153 www.operationhope.org/ http://www.operationhope.org/programs A network of community centers providing financial resources, classes and counseling in underserved neighborhoods. Operation HOPE gives people the dignity, resources and the opportunity to achieve a level of self-determination in their lives. With 2 million clients served, 20,000 HOPE Corps volunteers, and more than $1.5 billion in private capital directed into America’s low wealth and underserved communities, creating thousands of homeowners, small business owners and entrepreneurs over the past 20 years. Their mission is to make free enterprise and capitalism work for all.

MARYLAND

JVS – Baltimore 410-466-9200 www.jcsbaltimore.org JVS is a nonprofit, community-based health and human service organization, delivering a wide array of personalized services on a nonsectarian basis offers hope and opportunity to a diverse community through job training, education and expert career guidance, transforming lives and empowering individuals to achieve dignity and independence. HOPE Center -Baltimore 410-244-4457 410-545-2262 www.operationhope.org/ http://www.operationhope.org/programs A network of community centers providing financial resources, classes and counseling in underserved neighborhoods. Operation HOPE gives people the dignity, resources and the opportunity to achieve a level of self-determination in their lives. With 2 million clients served, 20,000 HOPE Corps volunteers, and more than $1.5 billion in private capital directed into America’s low wealth and underserved communities, creating thousands of homeowners, small business owners and entrepreneurs over the past 20 years. Their mission is to make free enterprise and capitalism work for all.

MASSACHUSETTS

JVS – Boston www.jvs-boston.org/ 617-451-9973 JVS is a nonprofit, community-based health and human service organization, delivering a wide array of personalized services on a nonsectarian basis offers hope and opportunity to a diverse community through job training, education and expert career guidance, transforming lives and empowering individuals to achieve dignity and independence. Pine Street Inn 617-892-9100 www.pinestreetinn.org/ With a mission to end homelessness, Pine Street Inn is New England’s leading provider of housing, shelter, street outreach and job training to homeless men and women.

MICHIGAN

HOPE Center – Detroit 313-664-2039 313-664-2091 www.operationhope.org/ http://www.operationhope.org/programs A network of community centers providing financial resources, classes and counseling in underserved neighborhoods. Operation HOPE gives people the dignity, resources and the opportunity to achieve a level of self-determination in their lives. With 2 million clients served, 20,000 HOPE Corps volunteers, and more than $1.5 billion in private capital directed into America’s low wealth and underserved communities, creating thousands of homeowners, small business owners and entrepreneurs over the past 20 years. Their mission is to make free enterprise and capitalism work for all. JVS – Detroit 248-559-5000 www.jvsdet.org JVS is a nonprofit, community-based health and human service organization, delivering a wide array of personalized services on a nonsectarian basis offers hope and opportunity to a diverse community through job training, education and expert career guidance, transforming lives and empowering individuals to achieve dignity and independence.

MINNESOTA

JVS – Minneapolis 952-591-0300 www.jfcsmpls.org JVS is a nonprofit, community-based health and human service organization, delivering a wide array of personalized services on a nonsectarian basis offers hope and opportunity to a diverse community through job training, education and expert career guidance, transforming lives and empowering individuals to achieve dignity and independence.

MISSOURI

JVS – St. Louis 314-241-3464 www.mersgoodwill.org JVS is a nonprofit, community-based health and human service organization, delivering a wide array of personalized services on a nonsectarian basis offers hope and opportunity to a diverse community through job training, education and expert career guidance, transforming lives and empowering individuals to achieve dignity and independence.

NEW JERSEY

JVS – MetroWest New Jersey www.jvsnj.org/ 973- 674-6330 JVS is a nonprofit, community-based health and human service organization, delivering a wide array of personalized services on a nonsectarian basis offers hope and opportunity to a diverse community through job training, education and expert career guidance, transforming lives and empowering individuals to achieve dignity and independence.

NEW YORK

The Association of Community Employment – ACE 212-274-0550 www.acenewyork.org/ The Association of Community Employment – ACE offers homeless employment programs and services. The 4 – 6 month program provides various opportunities to participants such as job training, work experience and a lifetime support network. Center for Employment Opportunities (CEO) – Albany 518 426 0390 http://ceoworks.org/our-offices/albany/ http://ceoworks.org/ The Center for Employment Opportunities (CEO) is dedicated to providing immediate, effective and comprehensive employment services to men and women with recent criminal convictions in New York. Our highly structured and tightly supervised programs help participants regain the skills and confidence needed for a successful transition to a stable, productive life. Center for Employment Opportunities (CEO) – Binghamton (607) 304 9986 http://ceoworks.org/our-offices/binghamton/ http://ceoworks.org/ The Center for Employment Opportunities (CEO) is dedicated to providing immediate, effective and comprehensive employment services to men and women with recent criminal convictions in New York. Our highly structured and tightly supervised programs help participants regain the skills and confidence needed for a successful transition to a stable, productive life. Center for Employment Opportunities (CEO) – Buffalo 716 842 6320 http://ceoworks.org/our-offices/buffalo/ http://ceoworks.org/ The Center for Employment Opportunities (CEO) is dedicated to providing immediate, effective and comprehensive employment services to men and women with recent criminal convictions in New York. Our highly structured and tightly supervised programs help participants regain the skills and confidence needed for a successful transition to a stable, productive life. Center for Employment Opportunities (CEO) – New York City 212 422 4430 http://ceoworks.org/our-offices/nyc-headquarters/ http://ceoworks.org/ The Center for Employment Opportunities (CEO) is dedicated to providing immediate, effective and comprehensive employment services to men and women with recent criminal convictions in New York. Our highly structured and tightly supervised programs help participants regain the skills and confidence needed for a successful transition to a stable, productive life. Center for Employment Opportunities (CEO) – Rochester 585 957 9858 http://ceoworks.org/our-offices/rochester/ http://ceoworks.org/ The Center for Employment Opportunities (CEO) is dedicated to providing immediate, effective and comprehensive employment services to men and women with recent criminal convictions in New York. Our highly structured and tightly supervised programs help participants regain the skills and confidence needed for a successful transition to a stable, productive life. The Doe Fund 212-628-5207 www.doe.org/ The Doe Fund is a New York nonprofit organization that provides paid transitional work, housing, educational opportunities, counseling, and career training to people with histories of homelessness, incarceration, and substance abuse to help them achieve independence and self-sufficiency. Education & Assistance Corporation (EAC) http://www.eacinc.org/ Founded in 1969, the Education & Assistance Corporation (EAC) is a not-for-profit human service agency with a network of 70 programs throughout Long Island and New York City. Last year EAC helped over 57,400 people of all ages. Their programs protect at-risk children, support senior citizens, help people with mental health and substance abuse problems, educate people seeking financial independence, assist individuals who are under or unemployed, mediate disputes and work with families in crisis. EAC offers a variety of vocational programs that assist individuals with multiple barriers to employment such as limited and/or no work experience, a history of substance abuse, mental health disorders or criminal history. Through its programs, EAC provides participants with the necessary skills to obtain and retain employment, enabling them to achieve self-sufficiency. Fedcap http://www.fedcap.org/ A nonprofit founded in 1935, Fedcap develops innovative, creative and sustainable solutions that help people surmount barriers, work toward economic independence, and effect change in their families and communities. HOPE – Harlem 917-477-2812 917-477-2823 www.operationhope.org/ http://www.operationhope.org/programs A network of community centers providing financial resources, classes and counseling in underserved neighborhoods. Operation HOPE gives people the dignity, resources and the opportunity to achieve a level of self-determination in their lives. With 2 million clients served, 20,000 HOPE Corps volunteers, and more than $1.5 billion in private capital directed into America’s low wealth and underserved communities, creating thousands of homeowners, small business owners and entrepreneurs over the past 20 years. Their mission is to make free enterprise and capitalism work for all. HOPE Financial Dignity Center New York 917-477-2800 917-477-2823 www.operationhope.org/ http://www.operationhope.org/programs A network of community centers providing financial resources, classes and counseling in underserved neighborhoods. Operation HOPE gives people the dignity, resources and the opportunity to achieve a level of self-determination in their lives. With 2 million clients served, 20,000 HOPE Corps volunteers, and more than $1.5 billion in private capital directed into America’s low wealth and underserved communities, creating thousands of homeowners, small business owners and entrepreneurs over the past 20 years. Their mission is to make free enterprise and capitalism work for all. JVS – NY /FEGS Health and Human Services System www.fegs.org 212-366-8400 JVS is a nonprofit, community-based health and human service organization, delivering a wide array of personalized services on a nonsectarian basis offers hope and opportunity to a diverse community through job training, education and expert career guidance, transforming lives and empowering individuals to achieve dignity and independence. Project Rise http://www.kbcc.cuny.edu/cewd/project_rise/pages/default.aspx Project Rise is a GED preparation program, enhanced with a comprehensive college and career readiness component. The year-long program offers up to twelve months of full time GED classes, 18 weeks of paid internship, job readiness training, credit bearing academic courses linked to KCC’s Tourism and Hospitality department, and employment placement assistance. Urban Pathways http://www.urbanpathways.org/ Urban Pathways’ outreach programs work with New York’s homeless population, helping them to leave the streets, become housing-ready through a rehabilitative process and move along the path to self-sufficiency and permanent housing.

NORTH CAROLINA

Hope Haven – Charlotte 704-372-8809 www.hopehaveninc.org/ Hope Haven’s vocational training programs provide participants in recovery with the skills they need to re-enter the workforce, gain confidence to succeed, and become economically independent while maintaining recovery. The New Beginnings Employment and Training – Charlotte 704-336-6933 http://charmeck.org/mecklenburg/county/CommunitySupportServices/Womenscommission/Employment/Pages/default.aspx The New Beginnings Employment and Training Program offers services to those who have worked in his or her own household and have provided unpaid household services, are unemployed or underemployed and looking for work and/or have been dependent on their own income or the income of another individuals.

OHIO

JVS – Cincinnati 513-985-0515 www.jvscinti.org JVS is a nonprofit, community-based health and human service organization, delivering a wide array of personalized services on a nonsectarian basis offers hope and opportunity to a diverse community through job training, education and expert career guidance, transforming lives and empowering individuals to achieve dignity and independence. JVS – Cleveland 216-504-2600 www.jfsa-cleveland.org JVS is a nonprofit, community-based health and human service organization, delivering a wide array of personalized services on a nonsectarian basis offers hope and opportunity to a diverse community through job training, education and expert career guidance, transforming lives and empowering individuals to achieve dignity and independence. JVS – Columbus 614-231-1890 www.jfscolumbus.org JVS is a nonprofit, community-based health and human service organization, delivering a wide array of personalized services on a nonsectarian basis offers hope and opportunity to a diverse community through job training, education and expert career guidance, transforming lives and empowering individuals to achieve dignity and independence.

OKLAHOMA

Center for Employment Opportunities (CEO) 918-894-6561 http://ceoworks.org/our-offices/tulsa-oklahoma/ http://ceoworks.org/ The Center for Employment Opportunities (CEO) is dedicated to providing immediate, effective and comprehensive employment services to men and women with recent criminal convictions in New York. Our highly structured and tightly supervised programs help participants regain the skills and confidence needed for a successful transition to a stable, productive life.

OREGON

HOPE Center (c/o Bank of the West) -Portland 503-796-5854 503-796-5857 www.operationhope.org/ http://www.operationhope.org/programs A network of community centers providing financial resources, classes and counseling in underserved neighborhoods. Operation HOPE gives people the dignity, resources and the opportunity to achieve a level of self-determination in their lives. With 2 million clients served, 20,000 HOPE Corps volunteers, and more than $1.5 billion in private capital directed into America’s low wealth and underserved communities, creating thousands of homeowners, small business owners and entrepreneurs over the past 20 years. Their mission is to make free enterprise and capitalism work for all.

PENNSYLVANIA

HOPE Center (c/o PNC) -Philadelphia 215-276-7105 215-276-7119 www.operationhope.org/ http://www.operationhope.org/programs A network of community centers providing financial resources, classes and counseling in underserved neighborhoods. Operation HOPE gives people the dignity, resources and the opportunity to achieve a level of self-determination in their lives. With 2 million clients served, 20,000 HOPE Corps volunteers, and more than $1.5 billion in private capital directed into America’s low wealth and underserved communities, creating thousands of homeowners, small business owners and entrepreneurs over the past 20 years. Their mission is to make free enterprise and capitalism work for all. JVS – Philadelphia /JEVS Human Services www.jevs.org 215-854-1800 JVS is a nonprofit, community-based health and human service organization, delivering a wide array of personalized services on a nonsectarian basis offers hope and opportunity to a diverse community through job training, education and expert career guidance, transforming lives and empowering individuals to achieve dignity and independence. JVS – Pittsburgh www.jfcspgh.org 412-422-7200 JVS is a nonprofit, community-based health and human service organization, delivering a wide array of personalized services on a nonsectarian basis offers hope and opportunity to a diverse community through job training, education and expert career guidance, transforming lives and empowering individuals to achieve dignity and independence.

RHODE ISLAND

Project RIRAL – Pawtucket 401-762-3841 www.riral.org/ RIRAL partnered with NetWorkri offers Adult Basic Education Classes and GED classes to adults. If you would like more information about programs and services offered at this location , please contact the directly. Family Resources Community Action – Woonsocket 401-766-0900 www.famresri.org/ Family Resources Community Action offers a variety of programs and services to help adults and youth with training, employment, education and self-sufficiency.

TEXAS

HOPE Center -Dallas 213-891-2900 www.operationhope.org/ http://www.operationhope.org/programs A network of community centers providing financial resources, classes and counseling in underserved neighborhoods. Operation HOPE gives people the dignity, resources and the opportunity to achieve a level of self-determination in their lives. With 2 million clients served, 20,000 HOPE Corps volunteers, and more than $1.5 billion in private capital directed into America’s low wealth and underserved communities, creating thousands of homeowners, small business owners and entrepreneurs over the past 20 years. Their mission is to make free enterprise and capitalism work for all.,/p> JVS – Dallas 972-437-9950 www.jfsdallas.org JVS is a nonprofit, community-based health and human service organization, delivering a wide array of personalized services on a nonsectarian basis offers hope and opportunity to a diverse community through job training, education and expert career guidance, transforming lives and empowering individuals to achieve dignity and independence. JVS – Houston 713-667-9336 www.jfshouston.org JVS is a nonprofit, community-based health and human service organization, delivering a wide array of personalized services on a nonsectarian basis offers hope and opportunity to a diverse community through job training, education and expert career guidance, transforming lives and empowering individuals to achieve dignity and independence.

WISCONSIN

Ways to Work www.waystowork.org/ Ways to Work is a unique Community Development Financial Institution based in Milwaukee, WI. Through a network of more than 50 loan offices across the country, Ways to Work, a nonprofit financial empowerment loan program, helps working families move to greater levels of self-sufficiency with access to financial education and reliable transportation. They provide small, short-term, low-interest loans to working poor families with challenging credit histories, providing an alternative to predatory lenders for people with a demonstrated commitment to achieving increased self-sufficiency and intent on achieving a higher level of participation in mainstream financial markets. The purpose of the loan is to help family members pay for unexpected expenses that could interfere with their ability to keep a job or stay in school. Most often the loans are used to purchase a reliable used car. To many, owning a car means the difference between getting or keeping a decent job, accessing high quality childcare, participating in children’s school related activities, and obtaining additional job training or education.

Access for Women – New York City College of Technology

www.citytech.cuny.edu/academics/continuinged/ 718-552-1131 This program provides women with support services to assist them in entering non-traditional technical fields/trades. They focus on upgrading math skills, providing prevocational and vocational training programs and information about career options in technical fields. They also conduct an outreach to junior and senior high school students and women in the community, a non-traditional vocational training program for teen mothers, pre-college math enrichment and programs for displaced, homeless and single parents.

Beyond Jobs – Walmart Program

http://www.goodwill.org/beyondjobs/ http://www.walmartcommunity.com/walmart-teams-up-with-goodwill-to-help-single-moms-go-beyond-jobs/ Funded by the Walmart Foundation and administered by Goodwill®, empowers single mothers with all the tools they need to find employment, succeed in the workplace and permanently support their families. In addition to job training and placement, the program also supports each woman’s continued success by designing an individualized, holistic plan that outlines how they will retain their jobs, advance in their careers, and ensure long-term financial stability for themselves and their children.

Carteret County Domestic Violence Program Intervention Prevention Education– North Carolina

www.kzgraphics.com/dvp 252-728-3788 The purpose of the CCDVP is to assist family members ¬ primarily women and children – who suffer when family violence occurs: to take action to develop, implement, and manage a program to assist victims of domestic violence and their children: to provide victims of abuse and their children information, supportive services and a safe place away from violence while they explore their alternatives and make decisions about their future.

Catherine Ferguson Academy for Girls

www.catherinefergusonacademy.org/ 313-596-4766 Catherine Ferguson Academy for young women is an alternative high school located in Detroit, MI. providing both education and parenting resources for pregnant and parenting students, grades 9-12.

Chicago Area Project

www.chicagoareaproject.org/ 312-663-3574 The Chicago Area Project provides free services and programs for low-income women stressing motivation and self-esteem building, reading and other basic skills, training, and referrals.

Christian Womens Job Corps of Kerr County

www.cwjckerrcounty.org/ 830-895-3660 Christian Womens Job Corps of Kerr County offers classes in areas such as Jobs for Life, Bible Study, personal finance, computer skills, resume preparation, interviewing skills, and business etiquette. A mentor is provided for each student and classes are conducted by trained volunteers.

Dress for Success

www.dressforsuccess.org/ Non-profit organization that provides interview suits, confidence boosts, and career development to low-income women in over 75 cities worldwide.

Fitting Futures

http://jle-ns.org/fitting-futures/ 847-441-0995 Fitting Futures is a Junior League of Evanston-North Shore community outreach effort providing support for low-income women in job training programs. Fitting Futures seeks to break the cycle of poverty and help women get back to work by providing a personal clothing and job readiness session and interview-appropriate attire at no cost; simultaneously boosting confidence and building careers.

Mercy Ministries of America

www.mercyministries.org/ (615)-831-6987 Mercy Ministries’ free-of-charge, voluntary, faith-based residential program serves young women from all socio-economic backgrounds, ages 13-28, who face a combination of life-controlling issues such as eating disorders, self-harm, drug and alcohol addictions, depression and unplanned pregnancy. Mercy also serves young women who have been physically and sexually abused, including victims of sex trafficking. Using proven methods, a holistic approach, classes in life skills, finance management, counseling, etc. in a structured residential environment, Mercy’s goal is to help these young women find freedom from their issues and empower them to serve in their communities as productive citizens. With locations in Tennessee, Louisiana, Missouri and California, Mercy has transformed thousands of lives.

Mothers Rebuilding

http://mothersrebuilding.org/ Their mission is to assist women in becoming economically self-sufficient through skill development, self -motivation, and empowerment. MRA achieves its mission by providing life skills training, training opportunities in non-traditional arenas such as the building trades, and supportive services to increase participant’s opportunities for success. The program features life skills, trade skills, on-the-job training opportunities, job placement and job retention components to increase participants’ chances for success for the Atlanta population, its surrounding cities as well as Detroit, Michigan and its surrounding areas.

New Friends New Life

http://www.newfriendsnewlife.org/ New Friends New Life is a faith-based organization located in the Dallas-Fort Worth area that enables women to leave the degradation of the sex industry and to their families. New Friends New Life restores and empowers trafficked girls and sexually exploited women and their children. By providing access to education, job training, interim financial assistance, mental health and spiritual support, New Friends New Life helps women and their children overcome backgrounds of abuse, addiction, poverty and limited opportunities.

The Nurturing Network

www.nurturingnetwork.org/ 800-TNN-4MOM 509-493-4026 The Nurturing Network is an international charitable organization that responds to the immediate and comprehensive needs of a woman facing the crisis of an unplanned pregnancy in Washington State. TNN’s nearly 50,000 volunteer Resource Members provide all of the practical support a woman needs to nurture her child’s life and make the most of hers as well. With a database of 22.000 volunteers across the country, the organization has offered jobs, host homes, counseling, medical assistance, and educational opportunities to 9,000 women.

Southwest Women Working Together

4051 W. 63rd, Chicago, IL 60629 (773) 582-0550 Southwest Women Working Together provides free services for low-income women, single mothers or displaced homemakers. Their workshops teach information on the workforce, how to write a résumé, and techniques for finding a job. Southwest Women Working Together also helps women get GEDs and/or a job, and offers monthly support groups once you are employed.

Suited for Change

www.suitedforchange.org/ Suited for Change is a non-profit organization that provides low-income women with professional clothing and job-readiness workshops. These workshops teach women soft skills like professionalism and managing conflicts at work, self-advocacy skills like negotiating salary and understanding human resources life skills like nutrition and financial literacy.

Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF)

www.hhs.gov/recovery/programs/tanf/ The Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program is designed to help needy families achieve self-sufficiency.

Washington Women’s Employment & Education

www.wwee.org/ Washington Women’s Employment & Education provides job-readiness and computer skills training along with housing and support services to low-income women. WWEE empowers women to create better lives for themselves and their families by teaching them the skills to find and keep jobs that provide a genuine living wage. On the work front, WWEE teaches job-readiness, computer and workplace skills training. On the home front, they help with housing assistance and support services to low-income residents of Pierce and King Counties.

Women’s Business Development Center

www.wbdc.org/ (312) 853-3477 The Women’s Business Development Center of the Chicago Institute for Economic Development provides services to women. The fees for these services vary depending on the specific programs that you choose. There are no qualifications for their program.

Women’s Circle

http://www.womenscircle.org/ Women’s Circle is a non-profit organization established in 2000 dedicated to helping lower income women achieve financial stability by providing assistance with education and job development. Services include resume preparation, interview techniques, client follow-up, and job application preparation. They promote confidence and help women overcome their personal barriers to success, provide career guidance, and assist in job searches and provide appropriate workplace clothing.

Women Employed Institute

www.womenemployed.org/ (312) 782-3902 The Women Employed Institute is a women’s membership organization which provides services to women in need. The program includes job banks, individual career and job counseling sessions, job search seminars, networking opportunities, assessment of educational, training, and support services needs, as well as supportive group sessions.

Women in Self Help

www.goodshepherds.org 718-768-9700 A job-readiness program for displaced homemakers serving mature women (over 30) who are heads of household and need to enter or re-evaluate the job market. Provides a six-week course on career goals, vocational assessment, assertiveness training, resume writing, interviewing techniques and a brush up on reading, writing and math.

NATIONAL/ MULTI-CITY

Job Corps www.jobcorps.gov/ 1-800-733-JOBS The nation’s largest and most comprehensive residential, education and job training program for at-risk youth, ages 16-24. Job Corps operates 118 primarily residential Job Corps centers located across the country and in Puerto Rico. Job Corps is a free education and training program that helps young people learn a career, earn a high school diploma or GED, and find and keep a good job. For eligible young people at least 16 years of age that qualify as low income, Job Corps provides the all-around skills needed to succeed in a career and in life. In addition to training, Job Corps students receive housing, meals, basic health care, and a living allowance twice a month. National Guard Challenge Program www.ngycp.org/ A preventive youth-at-risk program, targets unemployed drug-free and law-free high-school dropouts, 16 to 18 years of age. Core components of the program are citizenship, academic excellence (GED/high school diploma attainment), life-coping skills, community service, health and hygiene, skills training, leadership/followership, and physical training. The five-month residential phase is followed by a year-long mentoring relationship with a specially trained member from each youth’s community. YouthBuild USA www.youthbuild.org In YouthBuild programs, unemployed and undereducated young people ages 16-24 work toward their GED or high school diploma while learning job skills by building affordable housing for homeless and low-income people. Strong emphasis is placed on leadership development, community service, and the creation of a positive mini-community of adults and youth committed to success. There are 273 YouthBuild programs in 46 states, Washington, DC., and the Virgin Islands engaging approximately 10,000 young adults per year. Boys Town www.boystown.org/ As one of the largest nonprofit, founded more than 90 years ago, nonsectarian child and family care organizations in the country, Boys Town provides compassionate, research-proven treatment for behavioral, emotional and physical problems. Each year Boys Town services and programs touch the lives of 1.6 million people. Casey Family Programs www.casey.org/ Casey Family Programs is the nation’s largest operating foundation focused entirely on foster care and improving the child welfare system. Founded in 1966, they work to provide and improve ─ and ultimately prevent the need for ─ foster care in the United States.

ALABAMA

Gadsden Job Corps Center 600 Valley Street PO Box 286 Gadsden, AL 35902 Tel: (256) 547-6222 Fax: (256) 547-9040 http://gadsden.jobcorps.gov Montgomery Job Corps Center 1145 Air Base Boulevard Montgomery, AL 36108 Tel: (334) 262-8883 Fax: (334) 265-2339 http://montgomery.jobcorps.gov

ALASKA

Alaska Military Youth Academy Challenge Program 907-384-6017 Alaska Job Corps Center 800 E. Lynn Martin Drive Palmer, AK 99645 Tel: (907) 861-8800 Fax: (907) 861-8986 http://alaska.jobcorps.gov

ARIZONA

Arizona Project Challenge 480-988-4100 Youth Haven Ranches – Arizona www.youthhaven.org/ 520-466-3093 Youth Haven is a year-round charitable organization dedicated to meeting the emotional and physical needs of disadvantaged children free of charge. With campuses in Michigan and Arizona, they have designed year-round on-site programs, after school activities, hospital outreach, and follow-up efforts providing hope for the future. Fred G. Acosta Job Corps Center 901 S. Campbell Avenue Tucson, AZ 85719 Tel: (520) 792-3015 Fax: (520) 628-1552 http://fredgacosta.jobcorps.gov Phoenix Job Corps Center 518 S. Third Street Phoenix, AZ 85004 Tel: (602) 254-5921 Fax: (602) 322-7071 http://phoenix.jobcorps.gov

ARKANSAS

Arkansas Youth Challenge 501-212-5344 Cass Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center 21424 N. Highway 23 Ozark, AR 72949 Tel: (479) 667-3686 Fax: (479) 667-3989 http://cass.jobcorps.gov Little Rock Job Corps Center 6900 Scott Hamilton Drive Little Rock, AR 72209 Tel: (501) 618-2500 Fax: (501) 570-0410 http://littlerock.jobcorps.gov Ouachita Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center 570 Job Corps Road Royal, AR 71968 Tel: (501) 767-2707 Fax: (501) 321-3798 http://ouachita.jobcorps.gov Arkansas Baptist Children’s Homes and Family Ministries – Little Rock, AR www.abchomes.org/ 501-376-4791 The Arkansas Baptist Children’s Homes and Family Ministries (ABCHomes) is a non-profit agency of the Arkansas Baptist State Convention. Through residential childcare and counseling services, ABCHomes is seeking to be the foremost provider to children and families in crisis in Arkansas. ABCHomes provides a safe, secure home for an average of 320 children and youth each year, as well as provides about 2,300 counseling sessions a year. Children’s Homes – Paragould, AR childrenshomes.org/ (870) 239-4031 They are a faith-based organization that provides therapeutic care for children and families in need through family-style residential care, foster care, and adoptive services.

CALIFORNIA

Grizzly Youth Academy www.ngycp.org/site/state/ca/ 1-800-926-0643 The Grizzly Youth Academy is a Charter High School, run by the California National Guard and chartered through the San Luis Obispo County Office of Education. The academy is structured as a military boarding school to promote an academic environment that helps develop leadership, cooperation, and academic skills, while improving self-esteem, pride, and confidence. Inland Empire Job Corps Center 3173 Kerry Street PO Box 9550 San Bernardino, CA 92427-9550 Tel: (909) 887-6305 Fax: (909) 473-1511 http://inlandempire.jobcorps.gov Long Beach Job Corps Center 1903 Santa Fe Avenue Long Beach, CA 90810-4050 Tel: (562) 983-1777 Fax: (562) 983-6393 http://longbeach.jobcorps.gov Los Angeles Job Corps Center 1020 S. Olive Street Los Angeles, CA 90015 Tel: (213) 748-0135 Fax: (213) 741-5359 http://losangeles.jobcorps.gov Sacramento Job Corps Center 3100 Meadowview Road Sacramento, CA 95832 Tel: (916) 394-0770 Fax: (916) 429-499 http://sacramento.jobcorps.gov San Diego Job Corps Center 1325 Iris Avenue, Building 60 Imperial Beach, CA 91932-3751 Tel: (619) 429-8500 Fax: (619) 429-4909 http://sandiego.jobcorps.gov San Jose Job Corps Center 3485 East Hills Drive San Jose, CA 95127-2970 Tel: (408) 254-5627 Fax: (408) 254-5663 http://sanjose.jobcorps.gov Treasure Island Job Corps Center 351 H Avenue, Building 442 Treasure Island San Francisco, CA 94130-5027 Tel: (415) 277-2400 Fax: (415) 705-1776 http://treasureisland.jobcorps.gov Year Up -San Francisco Campus Phone: (415) 512-7588 http://www.yearup.org/locations/main.php?page=sfbay Year Up empowers urban talent to reach their potential through a one-year, intensive training program that provides low-income young adults, ages 18-24, with a combination of hands-on skill development, college credits, and corporate internships. Year Up -Silicon Valley Campus (San Jose) Phone: (408) 513-3004 http://www.yearup.org/locations/main.php?page=sfbay Year Up empowers urban talent to reach their potential through a one-year, intensive training program that provides low-income young adults, ages 18-24, with a combination of hands-on skill development, college credits, and corporate internships. Casa Pacifica – Camarillo, CA www.casapacifica.org/ Casa Pacifica serves abused and neglected children and adolescents, and those with severe emotional, social, behavioral, and mental health challenges. Their primary service area is California’s Central Coast, but referrals come from all over. They provide a comprehensive array of state of the art services to meet the varied and complex needs of children, youth and emerging adults. Orangewood Children’s Foundation – Santa Ana, CA www.orangewoodfoundation.org/ 714-619-0200 The mission of the Orangewood Children’s Foundation is to provide life-changing programs and support for abused and neglected children and at-risk families to end the cycle of child abuse. Nest Foundation – Los Angeles, CA www.idealist.org/view/nonprofit/hPzTFddhNJ74/ 323.461.3662

COLORADO

Collbran Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center 57608 Highway 330 Collbran, CO 81624 Tel: (970) 487-3576 Fax: (970) 487-3823 http://collbran.jobcorps.gov

CONNECTICUT

Hartford Job Corps Center 100 William Shorty Campbell Street Hartford, CT 06106 Tel: (860) 953-7201 Fax: (860) 952-0228 http://hartford.jobcorps.gov New Haven Job Corps Center 455 Wintergreen Avenue New Haven, CT 06515 Tel: (203) 397-3775 Fax: (203) 392-029 http://newhaven.jobcorps.gov

DELAWARE

Wilmington Job Corps Center 9 Vandever Avenue Wilmington, DE 19802 Tel: (302) 575-1710 Fax: (302) 575-1713 http://wilmington.jobcorps.gov

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA -WASHINGTON, DC

Potomac Job Corps Center No. 1 D.C. Village Lane, S.W. Washington, DC 20032-5206 Tel: (202) 574-5000 Fax: (202) 373-3181 http://potomac.jobcorps.gov Year Up National Capital Region- Washington, DC/Virginia Phone: (703) 312-9327 http://www.yearup.org/locations/main.php?page=natl_capital Year Up empowers urban talent to reach their potential through a one-year, intensive training program that provides low-income young adults, ages 18-24, with a combination of hands-on skill development, college credits, and corporate internships.

FLORIDA

Florida Youth Challenge Academy 1-866-276-9304 Gainesville Job Corps Center 5301 N.E. 40th Terrace Gainesville, FL 32609 Tel: (352) 377-2555 Fax: (352) 374-8257 http://gainesville.jobcorps.gov Homestead Job Corps Center 12350 S.W. 285th Street Homestead, FL 33033 Tel: (305) 257-4800 Fax: (305) 257-1429 http://homestead.jobcorps.gov Jacksonville Job Corps Center 4811 Payne Stewart Drive Jacksonville, FL 32209 Tel: (904) 360-8200 Fax: (904) 632-5498 http://jacksonville.jobcorps.gov Miami Job Corps Center 3050 N.W. 183rd Street Miami, FL 33056 Tel: (305) 620-3100 Fax: (305) 626-7857 http://miami.jobcorps.gov Pinellas County Job Corps Center 500 22nd Street South St. Petersburg, FL 33712 Tel: (727) 551-2900 Fax: (727) 551-2992 http://pinellascounty.jobcorps.gov Vita Nova – West Palm Beach, FL http://www.vitanovainc.org/ Vita Nova Inc. is a public charity that has worked to address the high priority needs of Palm Beach County’s adolescents and their families since 1999. Vita Nova’s original mission and intention, under the name of Renaissance Village, was to construct, operate, and endow an academic and vocational boarding school for socially and economically disadvantaged students. Towards this aim, Vita Nova empowered thirty-seven (37) inner-city faith communities to establish successful neighborhood-based services and served more than 2,500 children and their families. Year Up -Miami Dade College Phone: (305) 978-4225 http://www.yearup.org/locations/main.php?page=miami Year Up empowers urban talent to reach their potential through a one-year, intensive training program that provides low-income young adults, ages 18-24, with a combination of hands-on skill development, college credits, and corporate internships. <h4georgia<> Fort Gordon Youth Challenge Academy (Georgia) 706-791-5950 Fort Stewart Youth Challenge Academy (Georgia) 912-767-2666 Atlanta Job Corps Center 239 West Lake Avenue NW Atlanta, GA 30314 Tel: (404) 794-9512 Fax: (404) 794-8426 http://atlanta.jobcorps.gov Brunswick Job Corps Center 4401 Glynco Industrial Park Brunswick, GA 31525 Tel: (912) 264-8843 Fax: (912) 267-7192 http://brunswick.jobcorps.gov Turner Job Corps Center 2000 Schilling Avenue Albany, GA 31705-1524 Tel: (229) 883-8500 Fax: (229) 434-0383 http://turner.jobcorps.gov Year Up – Atlanta Phone: (404) 249-0300 http://www.yearup.org/locations/main.php?page=atlanta Year Up empowers urban talent to reach their potential through a one-year, intensive training program that provides low-income young adults, ages 18-24, with a combination of hands-on skill development, college credits, and corporate internships.

HAWAII

Hawaii Youth Challenge Academy 808-673-7530 Hawaii Job Corps Center 41-467 Hihimanu Street Waimanalo, HI 96795 Tel: (808) 259-6070 Fax: (808) 259-7907 http://hawaii.jobcorps.gov Maui Job Corps Center 500 Ike Drive Maui Makawao, HI 96768 Tel: (808) 579-8450 Fax: (808) 579-9498 http://maui.jobcorps.gov

ILLINOIS

Lincoln’s Challenge (Illinois) 217-892-1315 Golconda Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center Route 1 Box 104A Golconda, IL 62938 Tel: (618) 285-6601 Fax: (618) 285-5296 http://golconda.jobcorps.gov Joliet Job Corps Center 1101 Mills Road Joliet, IL 60433 Tel: (815) 727-7677 Fax: (815) 723-7052 http://joliet.jobcorps.gov Paul Simon Chicago Job Corps Center 3348 S. Kedzie Avenue Chicago, IL 60623 Tel: (773) 847-9820 Fax: (773) 847-9823 http://paulsimonchicago.jobcorps.gov Year Up – Chicago Phone: (312) 726-5300 http://www.yearup.org/locations/main.php?page=chicago Year Up empowers urban talent to reach their potential through a one-year, intensive training program that provides low-income young adults, ages 18-24, with a combination of hands-on skill development, college credits, and corporate internships. Prologue (773) 728-7221 Prologue provides free services to the disadvantaged and teen mothers who have dropped out of high school providing basic literacy, reading, and writing, GED prep, counseling, training, and job referrals and placement in Chicago. Mooseheart Child City and School – Chicago, IL www.mooseheart.org/ (630) 859-2000 Mooseheart is a residential childcare facility, located on a 1,000-acre campus 38 miles west of Chicago. The Child City is a home for children and teens in need, from infancy through high school.

INDIANA

Atterbury Job Corps Center PO Box 187 Edinburgh, IN 46124 Tel: (812) 314-6000 Fax: (812) 314-6143 http://atterbury.jobcorps.gov IndyPendence Job Corps Center 222 E. Ohio Street Suite 300 Indianapolis, IN 46204 Tel: (317) 524-6788 Fax: (317) 524-6798 http://indypendence.jobcorps.gov

IDAHO

Centennial Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center 3201 Ridgecrest Drive Nampa, ID 83687 Tel: (208) 442-4500 Fax: (208) 442-4506 http://centennial.jobcorps.gov

IOWA

Quakerdale- New Providence, IA www.quakerdale.org/ Denison Job Corps Center 10 Opportunity Drive PO Box 610 Denison, IA 51442 Tel: (712) 263-4192 Fax: (712) 263-6910 http://denison.jobcorps.gov Ottumwa Job Corps Center 15229 Truman Street Ottumwa, IA 52501 Tel: (641) 682-2000 Fax: (641) 682-0519 http://ottumwa.jobcorps.gov

KANSAS

Flint Hills Job Corps Center 4620 Eureka Drive Manhattan, KS 66503 Tel: (785) 537-7222 Fax: (785) 537-9517 http://flinthills.jobcorps.gov

KENTUCKY

Kentucky Bluegrass Challenge Academy 502-624-3698 Carl D. Perkins Job Corps Center 478 Meadows Branch Road Prestonsburg, KY 41653-1501 Tel: (606) 433-2256 Fax: (606) 433-5401 http://carldperkins.jobcorps.gov Earle C. Clements Job Corps Center 2302 U.S. Highway 60 East Morganfield, KY 42437-6608 Tel: (270) 389-2419 Fax: (270) 389-1134 http://earlecclements.jobcorps.gov Frenchburg Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center 6969 Tarr Ridge Road Frenchburg, KY 40322 Tel: (606) 768-2111 Fax: (606) 768-3080 http://frenchburg.jobcorps.gov Great Onyx Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center 3115 Ollie Ridge Road Mammoth Cave, KY 42259 Tel: (270) 286-4514 Fax: (270) 286-1120 http://greatonyx.jobcorps.gov Muhlenberg Job Corps Center 3875 State Route Highway 181 North Greenville, KY 42345 Tel: (270) 338-5460 Fax: (270) 338-3615 http://muhlenberg.jobcorps.gov Pine Knot Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center PO Box 1990 132 Job Corps Road Pine Knot, KY 42635 Tel: (606) 354-2176 Fax: (606) 354-2170 http://pineknot.jobcorps.gov Whitney M. Young Jr. Job Corps Center 8460 Shelbyville Road Simpsonville, KY 40067 Tel: (502) 722-8862 Fax: (866) 343-1899 http://whitneymyoung.jobcorps.gov

LOUISIANA

Louisiana Youth Challenge 1-800-CAMP-KID Mercy Ministries of America (Louisiana) 615-831-6987 Carville Job Corps Center 5465 Point Clair Road Carville, LA 70721 Tel: (225) 642-0699 Fax: (225) 642-9564 http://carville.jobcorps.gov New Orleans Job Corps Center 8825 Airline Highway New Orleans, LA 70118 Tel: (504) 484-3501 Fax: (504) 484-3598 http://neworleans.jobcorps.gov Shreveport Job Corps Center 2815 Lillian Street Shreveport, LA 71109 Tel: (318) 227-9331 Fax: (318) 222-0768 http://shreveport.jobcorps.gov

MAINE

Loring Job Corps Center 36 Montana Road Limestone, ME 04750 Tel: (207) 328-4212 Fax: (207) 328-4219 http://loring.jobcorps.gov Penobscot Job Corps Center 1375 Union Street Bangor, ME 04401 Tel: (207) 990-3000 Fax: (207) 942-9829 http://penobscot.jobcorps.gov

MARYLAND

Freestate Challenge Academy (Maryland) 410-306-1804 Woodland Job Corps Center 3300 Fort Mead Road Laurel, MD 20724 Tel: (301) 362-6000 Fax: (301) 362-6052 http://woodland.jobcorps.gov Woodstock Job Corps Center 10900 Old Court Road Woodstock, MD 21163 Tel: (410) 461-1100 Fax: (410) 461-5794 http://woodstock.jobcorps.gov Year Up -Baltimore Phone: (410) 462-8446 http://www.yearup.org/locations/main.php?page=baltimore Year Up empowers urban talent to reach their potential through a one-year, intensive training program that provides low-income young adults, ages 18-24, with a combination of hands-on skill development, college credits, and corporate internships.

MASSACHUSETTS

Amp It UP! http://ampitupma.com/ 987-784-2965 Advanced manufacturing jobs are creative, highly skilled, and well-paying. AMP it up! shows students, parents, guidance counselors, and teachers how advanced manufacturing careers can put them on the path to success. Grafton Job Corps Center 100 Pine Street North Grafton, MA 01536 Tel: (508) 887-7300 Fax: (508) 839-9781 http://grafton.jobcorps.gov Shriver Job Corps Center 270 Jackson Road Devens, MA 01434-5106 Tel: (978) 784-2600 Fax: (978) 784-2721 http://shriver.jobcorps.gov Westover Job Corps Center 103 Johnson Road Chicopee, MA 01022 Tel: (413) 593-4000 Fax: (413) 593-4091 http://westover.jobcorps.gov Pathfinder Vocational HS http://www.pathfindertech.org/ The Pathfinder Regional Vocational-Technical High School District is designed to offer vocational-technical training in conjunction with a sound academic program. The primary purpose of the Pathfinder Regional Vocational-Technical High School is to enable students to become productive and responsible members of the community, providing students with the knowledge and learning experiences that give them the options of securing gainful employment upon graduation, continuing formal studies at the post-secondary level, or pursuing a combination of both. Year Up – Boston (617) 542‐1533 http://www.yearup.org/locations/main.php?page=boston Year Up empowers urban talent to reach their potential through a one-year, intensive training program that provides low-income young adults, ages 18-24, with a combination of hands-on skill development, college credits, and corporate internships.

MICHIGAN

Michigan Youth Challenge Academy 269-968-1397 Youth Haven Ranches – Michigan www.youthhaven.org/ 517-569-3328 Youth Haven is a year-round charitable organization dedicated to meeting the emotional and physical needs of disadvantaged children free of charge. With campuses in Michigan and Arizona, they have designed year-round on-site programs, after school activities, hospital outreach, and follow-up efforts providing hope for the future. Detroit Job Corps Center 11801 Woodrow Wilson Street Detroit, MI 48206 Tel: (313) 852-0300 Fax: (313) 865-8791 http://detroit.jobcorps.gov Flint-Genesee Job Corps Center 2400 N. Saginaw Street Flint, MI 48505 Tel: (810) 232-9102 Fax: (810) 232-6835 http://flintgenesee.jobcorps.gov Gerald R. Ford Job Corps Center 110 Hall Street S.E. Grand Rapids, MI 49507 Tel: (616) 243-6877 Fax: (616) 243-4012 http://geraldrford.jobcorps.gov Good Will Farm – Houghton, MI www.upkids.com/ (906) 482-0520 Founded in 1899, Good Will Farm provides a year-round, 24-hour structured program in a home-like environment for youth ages 12-17. The program encompasses individualized educational programming, community volunteer work, building trust and self-esteem through adventure activities, and learning life and independent living skills. Good Will Farm has the capacity to serve 20 boys and girls from Michigan’s Upper Peninsula area.

MINNESOTA

Hubert H. Humphrey Job Corps Center 1480 N. Snelling Avenue St. Paul, MN 55108 Tel: (651) 642-1133 Fax: (651) 642-0123 http://huberthhumphrey.jobcorps.gov

MISSISSIPPI

Mississippi Youth Challenge 1-800-507-6253 Mercy Ministries of America (Missouri) 615-831-6987 Finch-Henry Job Corps Center 821 Highway 51 South Batesville, MS 38606 Tel: (662) 563-4656 Fax: (662) 563-1644 http://finchhenry.jobcorps.gov Gulfport Job Corps Center 3300 20th Street Gulfport, MS 39501-4311 Tel: (228) 863-1141 Fax: (228) 863-1142 http://gulfport.jobcorps.gov Mississippi Job Corps Center 400 Harmony Road Crystal Springs, MS 39059 Tel: (601) 892-3348 Fax: (601) 892-3719 http://mississippi.jobcorps.gov Palmer Home – Columbus, MS palmerhome.org/ 662-328-5704 Palmer Home for Children is a faith-based organization which provides superior residential care for children in need. Palmer Home for Children currently serves nearly 100 boys and girls from birth through college age who live year-round on two campuses in Columbus, MS and near Hernando, MS. It also extends counseling to the family of origin, foster care, and other family-related services that Palmer offers through its well-qualified, professional staff.

MISSOURI

Excelsior Springs Job Corps Center 701 St. Louis Avenue Excelsior Springs, MO 64024 Tel: (816) 629-3111 Fax: (816) 629-3842 http://excelsiorsprings.jobcorps.gov Mingo Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center 4253 State Highway T Puxico, MO 63960-9585 Tel: (573) 222-3537 Fax: (573) 222-2685 http://mingo.jobcorps.gov St. Louis Job Corps Center 4333 Goodfellow Boulevard St. Louis, MO 6312 Tel: (314) 679-6200 Fax: (314) 383-5717 http://stlouis.jobcorps.gov

MONTANA

Montana Youth Challenge Program 1-877-367-6927 Anaconda Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center 1407 Foster Creek Road Anaconda, MT 59711 Tel: (406) 563-8700 Fax: (406) 563-8243 http://anaconda.jobcorps.gov Kicking Horse Job Corps Center 33091 Mollman Pass Trail Ronan, MT 59864 Tel: (406) 644-2217 Fax: (406) 644-2343 http://kickinghorse.jobcorps.gov Trapper Creek Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center 5139 West Fork Road Darby, MT 59829-5139 Tel: (406) 821-3286 Fax: (406) 821-3290 http://trappercreek.jobcorps.gov

NEBRASKA

Pine Ridge Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center 15710 Highway 385 Chadron, NE 69337 Tel: (308) 432-3316 Fax: (308) 432-8695 http://pineridge.jobcorps.gov

NEVADA

Nevada Youth Challenge Program 775-885-8201 Sierra Nevada Job Corps Center 14175 Mt. Charleston Street Reno, NV 89506 Tel: (775) 789-1000 Fax: (775) 789-1098 http://sierranevada.jobcorps.gov

NEW JERSEY

New Jersey Challenge Youth Program 609-562-0571 Edison Job Corps Center 500 Plainfield Avenue Edison, NJ 08817-2587 Tel: (732) 985-4800 Fax: (732) 985-8551 http://edison.jobcorps.gov Crossroads Programs http://www.crossroadsprograms.org/ (609) 880-0210 The Crossroads’ mission is to empower youth who are homeless, abandoned, abused, or at-risk to lead healthy, productive lives. The agency has developed considerable expertise in serving youth who must transition to independent young adulthood without the support and guidance typically provided by family. The Crossroads continuum of care for homeless youth – shelter care, outreach services, group homes, residential treatment, community-based treatment homes, life skills training and family therapy has resulted in improved outcomes and enhanced futures for the thousands of kids and families served.

NEW MEXICO

New Mexico Youth Challenge Academy 1-800-366-9098 Albuquerque Job Corps Center 1500 Indian School Road N.W. Albuquerque, NM 87104 Tel: (505) 222-4243 Fax: (505) 346-2769 http://albuquerque.jobcorps.gov Roswell Job Corps Center PO Box 5970 57 G Street Roswell, NM 88202-5970 Tel: (575) 347-5414 Fax: (575) 347-2243 http://roswell.jobcorps.gov

NEW YORK

Graham Windham – New York, NY www.graham-windham.org/ (212) 368-4100 Graham Windham strives to make a life-altering difference with children, youth and families affected by abuse, neglect and delinquency by providing each child we serve with a strong foundation for life: a safe, loving, permanent family and the opportunity and preparation to thrive in school and in the world. Bronx Referral Center for High School Alternatives http://schools.nyc.gov/Offices/District79/SchoolsProgramsServices/default.htm (718) 842-9200 One-stop guidance centers where students can learn about and get connected to Department of Education (DOE) high school options, GED, and to other supports that will help them graduate. Bronx Regional High School. Brooklyn Referral Center for High School Alternatives http://schools.nyc.gov/Offices/District79/SchoolsProgramsServices/default.htm (718)636-5770 One-stop guidance centers where students can learn about and get connected to Department of Education (DOE) high school options, GED, and to other supports that will help them graduate. Manhattan Referral Center for High School Alternatives http://schools.nyc.gov/Offices/District79/SchoolsProgramsServices/default.htm (212)244-1274 One-stop guidance centers where students can learn about and get connected to Department of Education (DOE) high school options, GED, and to other supports that will help them graduate. District 79 Office of Student Support Services youthhelp@schools.nyc.gov http://schools.nyc.gov/Offices/District79/SchoolsProgramsServices/default.htm (917)521-3639 One-stop guidance centers where students can learn about and get connected to Department of Education (DOE) high school options, GED, and to other supports that will help them graduate. Center for High School Alternatives –Headquarters/Main Office http://schools.nyc.gov/Offices/District79/SchoolsProgramsServices/default.htm (917)521-3639 One-stop guidance centers where students can learn about and get connected to Department of Education (DOE) high school options, GED, and to other supports that will help them graduate. Queens Referral Center for High School Alternatives http://schools.nyc.gov/Offices/District79/SchoolsProgramsServices/default.htm (718)739-2100 One-stop guidance centers where students can learn about and get connected to Department of Education (DOE) high school options, GED, and to other supports that will help them graduate. Staten Island Referral Center for High School Alternatives http://schools.nyc.gov/Offices/District79/SchoolsProgramsServices/default.htm (718)273-3225 One-stop guidance centers where students can learn about and get connected to Department of Education (DOE) high school options, GED, and to other supports that will help them graduate. GED Plus http://www.gedplus.net/site/default.aspx?PageID=1 (718) 636-5770 GED Plus helps students earn their GED plus prepares them for college and career options. Students 18 – 21 years old can choose to participate in a full-time or part-time program. GED Plus is offered at no cost and has many locations throughout the city. Living for the Young Family through Education (LYFE) http://lyfenyc.org/ The Living for the Young Family through Education (LYFE) guarantees that all student parents graduate from high school and are college/career ready, while transitioning into parenthood. LYFE provides free, high-quality childcare and academic, social/emotional, and referral support services at each of its 37 sites, across the city. Co-Op Tech www.co-optech.org/ The School of Cooperative Technical Education, or Co Op Tech, offers 17 different certification courses in a variety of careers from culinary arts to computer networking. The program has a half-day model where students can attend their DOE high school or GED program for half a day and attend Co Op Tech for the other half of the day. DOE Court Liaisons http://schools.nyc.gov/Offices/District79/SchoolsProgramsServices/default.htm DOE Court Liaisons assist court-involved students, their families, and the agencies that support them so that students experience minimal interruption to their education. They provide current and applicable information that supports court-involved students in achieving their educational goals. Court liaisons are available, reliable, and committed to the academic success of every student in the Courts. East River Academy (ERA) www.eastriveracademy.com/ East River Academy is an educational program that serves incarcerated students aged 16-21 in multiple locations on Rikers Island in New York City. The academic curriculum is designed to support students in obtaining either a high school diploma or a GED diploma. ERA staff work with students to develop a successful plan for their transition to their next appropriate academic placement. Passages Academy www.nyc.gov/html/acs/html/yfj/detention_services.shtm Passages Academy provides educational instruction and counseling for students ages 16 and younger in detention and placement facilities and provides academic instruction to students diverted from incarceration. The academic curriculum is designed to help students complete their middle school or high school requirements. Passages develops individual transition plans to ensure student success at the next appropriate academic placement. Brooklyn Job Corps Center 585 DeKalb Avenue Brooklyn, NY 11205 Tel: (718) 623-4000 Fax: (718) 623-9626 http://brooklyn.jobcorps.gov Cassadaga Job Corps Center 8115 Glasgow Road Cassadaga, NY 14718-9606 Tel: (716) 595-8760 Fax: (716) 595-4396 http://cassadaga.jobcorps.gov Delaware Valley Job Corps Center PO Box 846 9368 State Route 97 Callicoon, NY 12723 Tel: (845) 887-5400 Fax: (845) 887-4762 http://delawarevalley.jobcorps.gov Glenmont Job Corps Center PO Box 993 822 River Road Glenmont, NY 12077-0993 Tel: (518) 767-9371 Fax: (518) 767-2106 http://glenmont.jobcorps.gov Iroquois Job Corps Center 11780 Tibbets Road Medina, NY 14103 Tel: (585) 798-7000 Fax: (585) 798-7046 http://iroquois.jobcorps.gov Oneonta Job Corps Center 21 Homer Folks Avenue Oneonta, NY 13820 Tel: (607) 433-2111 Fax: (607) 431-1518 http://oneonta.jobcorps.gov South Bronx Job Corps Center 1771 Andrews Avenue Bronx, NY 10453-6803 Tel: (718) 731-7700 Fax: (718) 731-3543 http://southbronx.jobcorps.gov Year Up – New York (212) 785-3340 http://www.yearup.org/locations/main.php?page=newyork Year Up empowers urban talent to reach their potential through a one-year, intensive training program that provides low-income young adults, ages 18-24, with a combination of hands-on skill development, college credits, and corporate internships.

NORTH CAROLINA

Tarheel Challenge Youth Program (North Carolina) 1-800-573-9966 Kittrell Job Corps Center PO Box 278 1096 U.S. Highway 1 South Kittrell, NC 27544 Tel: (252) 438-6161 Fax: (252) 492-9630 http://kittrell.jobcorps.gov Lyndon B. Johnson Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center 3170 Wayah Road Franklin, NC 28734 Tel: (828) 524-4446 Fax: (828) 369-7338 http://lyndonbjohnson.jobcorps.gov Oconaluftee Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center 502 Oconaluftee Job Corps Road Cherokee, NC 28719 Tel: (828) 497-5411 Fax: (828) 497-6539 http://oconaluftee.jobcorps.gov Schenck Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center 98 Schenck Drive Pisgah Forest, NC 28768 Tel: (828) 862-6100 Fax: (828) 877-3028 http://schenck.jobcorps.gov

NORTH DAKOTA

Quentin N. Burdick Job Corps Center 1500 University Avenue West Minot, ND 58703 Tel: (701) 857-9600 Fax: (701) 838-9979 http://quentinnburdick.jobcorps.gov

OHIO

Cincinnati Job Corps Center 1409 Western Avenue Cincinnati, OH 45214 Tel: (513) 651-2000 Fax: (513) 651-2004 http://cincinnati.jobcorps.gov Cleveland Job Corps Center 13421 Coit Road Cleveland, OH 44110 Tel: (216) 541-2500 Fax: (216) 541-7791 http://cleveland.jobcorps.gov Dayton Job Corps Center 3849 Germantown Pike Dayton, OH 45417 Tel: (937) 268-6571 Fax: (937) 267-3822 http://dayton.jobcorps.gov

OKLAHOMA

Thunderbird Youth Academy (Oklahoma)9 18-824-4850 Guthrie Job Corps Center 3106 W. University Guthrie, OK 73044 Tel: (405) 282-9930 Fax: (405) 282-9501 http://guthrie.jobcorps.gov Talking Leaves Job Corps Center PO Box 1066 5700 Bald Hill Road Tahlequah, OK 74465 Tel: (918) 456-9959 Fax: (918) 207-3489 http://talkingleaves.jobcorps.gov Treasure Lake Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center 1111 Indiahoma Road Indiahoma, OK 73552 Tel: (580) 246-3203 Fax: (580) 246-8222 http://treasurelake.jobcorps.gov Tulsa Job Corps Center 1133 N. Lewis Avenue Tulsa, OK 74110 Tel: (918) 585-9111 Fax: (918) 592-2430 http://tulsa.jobcorps.gov Oklahoma Baptist Home – Oklahoma City, OK www.obhc.org/ (405) 942-3800 Oklahoma Baptist Homes for Children is the largest provider of private, not-for-profit, residential childcare in the state. Their maternity services provide an adolescent maternity home, a program for girls who choose to parent but still need assistance and a safe place to live after the birth of their baby, and a program for pregnant or parenting women over 18 who need a home and a “helping hand” in Tulsa. White Fields – Piedmont, OK www.whitefieldsok.com/ 405-302-5123 White Fields’ mission is to provide a continuum model of care offering a long-term home for abused and neglected boys age 8 to 18. White Fields provides residential cottages for the boys as well as an on-campus school. The staples of our program include opportunities for recreation, learning, mentoring, community involvement and quality mental health treatment. Our primary goal is to provide these boys hope and stability to help them along their roads to recovery and healing.

OREGON

Oregon Youth Challenge Program 541-317-9623 ext 223 Angell Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center 335 N.E. Blodgett Road Yachats, OR 97498 Tel: (541) 547-3137 Fax: (541) 547-5690 http://angell.jobcorps.gov Partners in Vocational Opportunity Training (PIVOT) Job Corps Center 2701 N.W. Vaughn Street Suite 151 Portland, OR 97210 Tel: (503) 274-7343 Fax: (503) 223-5771 http://pivot.jobcorps.gov Springdale Job Corps Center 31224 E. Historic Columbia River Highway Troutdale, OR 97060 Tel: (503) 695-2245 Fax: (503) 695-2254 http://springdale.jobcorps.gov Timber Lake Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center 59868 East Highway 224 Estacada, OR 97023 Tel: (503) 834-2291 Fax: (503) 834-2333 http://timberlake.jobcorps.gov Tongue Point Job Corps Center 37573 Old Highway 30 Astoria, OR 97103 Tel: (503) 325-2131 Fax: (503) 325-5375 http://tonguepoint.jobcorps.gov Wolf Creek Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center 2010 Opportunity Lane Glide, OR 97443-9733 Tel: (800) 588-9003 Fax: (541) 496-8515 http://wolfcreek.jobcorps.gov

PENNSYLVANIA

Keystone Job Corps Center 235 W. Foothills Drive Drums, PA 18222-2410 Tel: (570) 788-1164 Fax: (570) 788-1119 http://keystone.jobcorps.gov Philadelphia Job Corps Center 2810 S. 20th Street, Bldg. 12 Philadelphia, PA 19145-5001 Tel: (267) 386-2888 Fax: (215) 334-3675 http://philadelphia.jobcorps.gov Pittsburgh Job Corps Center 7175 Highland Drive Pittsburgh, PA 15206 Tel: (412) 441-8700 Fax: (412) 441-1586 http://pittsburgh.jobcorps.gov Red Rock Job Corps Center PO Box 218 Route 487 North Lopez, PA 18628 Tel: (570) 477-2221 Fax: (570) 477-3046 http://redrock.jobcorps.gov

RHODE ISLAND

Exeter Job Corps Center 162 Main Street Exeter, RI 02822 Tel: (401) 268-6000 Fax: (401) 294-0471 http://exeter.jobcorps.gov Year Up – Providence Phone: (401) 421-7819 http://www.yearup.org/locations/main.php?page=providence Year Up empowers urban talent to reach their potential through a one-year, intensive training program that provides low-income young adults, ages 18-24, with a combination of hands-on skill development, college credits, and corporate internships.

SOUTH CAROLINA

South Carolina Youth Challenge Academy 803-896-6480 Bamberg Job Corps Center 19 Job Corps Avenue Bamberg, SC 29003 Tel: (803) 245-5101 Fax: (803) 245-5915 http://bamberg.jobcorps.gov Connie Maxwell – Greenwood, SC www.conniemaxwell.com/ (864) 942-1400 Connie Maxwell is a home for some children who have been abandoned, abused, or neglected and some who have been placed by loving caregivers going through difficult situations. Children who remain through high school graduation receive financial support for college.

SOUTH DAKOTA

Boxelder Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center PO Box 110 22023 Job Corps Place Nemo, SD 57759-0110 Tel: (605) 348-3636 Fax: (605) 578-1157 http://boxelder.jobcorps.gov

TEXAS

Seaborne Challenge (Texas) 409-741-7131 David L. Carrasco Job Corps Center 11155 Gateway West El Paso, TX 79935 Tel: (915) 594-0022 Fax: (915) 591-0166 http://davidlcarrasco.jobcorps.gov Gary Job Corps Center 2800 Airport Highway 21 PO Box 967 San Marcos, TX 78667 Tel: (512) 396-6652 Fax: (512) 396-6666 http://gary.jobcorps.gov Laredo Job Corps Center 1701 Island Street PO Box 1819 Laredo, TX 78041 Tel: (956) 727-5147 Fax: (956) 727-1937 http://laredo.jobcorps.gov North Texas Job Corps Center 1701 N. Church Street McKinney, TX 75069 Tel: (972) 542-2623 Fax: (214) 547-7700 http://northtexas.jobcorps.gov Cal Farley’s Boys Ranch & Girls Town – Texas http://www.calfarley.org/ 1-800-687-3722 Cal Farley’s is one of America’s largest privately-funded child and family service providers specializing in both residential and community-based services at no cost to parents. The Cal Farley organization provides Christ-centered basic-care residential programs and services for at-risk boys and girls from throughout the United States. The campus-based programs specialize in short-term and long-term care at Cal Farley’s Boys Ranch program and Cal Farley’s Girlstown, for mothers and children who find themselves struggling to meet the everyday necessities of life. Women aged 18 and up with at least one child may be eligible for this program. Ben Richey Boys Ranch – Abilene, TX benrichey.org/ (325) 692-2500 Boys and Girls Country School – Hockley, TX www.boysandgirlscountry.org/ Children at Heart Ministries – Round Rock, TX www.childrenatheartministries.org Happy Hill Farm Academy – Granbury, TX www.happyhillfarm.org/ Methodist Children’s – Waco, TX www.methodistchildrenshome.org/ Miracle Farm – Brenham, TX www.childrenatheartministries.org/page.aspx?pid=1172 Presbyterian Children’s – Austin, TX pchas.org/ Starry School – Round Rock, TX www.childrenatheartministries.org/STARRY-Counseling-Round-Rock Texas Baptist Children’s – Round Rock, TX www.childrenatheartministries.org/TBCH-Home

TENNESSEE

Mercy Ministries of America (Tennessee) 615-831-6987 Dr. Benjamin L. Hooks Job Corps Center 1555 McAlister Drive Memphis, TN 38116 Tel: (901) 396-2800 Fax: (901) 396-8712 http://benjaminlhooks.jobcorps.gov Jacobs Creek Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center 984 Denton Valley Road Bristol, TN 37620-1430 Tel: (423) 878-4021 Fax: (423) 878-7034 http://jacobscreek.jobcorps.gov Tennessee Baptist Children’s – Brentwood, TN www.tbch4kids.org/

UTAH

Clearfield Job Corps Center 20 West 1700 South PO Box 160070 Clearfield, UT 84016-0070 Tel: (801) 774-4000 Fax: (801) 416-4635 http://clearfield.jobcorps.gov Weber Basin Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center 7400 S. Cornia Drive Ogden, UT 84405-9605 Tel: (801) 479-9806 Fax: (801) 476-5985 http://weberbasin.jobcorps.gov

VERMONT

Northlands Job Corps Center 100A MacDonough Drive Vergennes, VT 05491 Tel: (802) 877-2922 Fax: (802) 877-039 http://northlands.jobcorps.gov

VIRGINIA

Virginia Commonwealth Challenge 1-800-796-6472 Blue Ridge Job Corps Center 245 W. Main Street Marion, VA 24354 Tel: (276) 783-7221 Fax: (276) 783-1751 http://blueridge.jobcorps.gov Flatwoods Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center 2803 Dungannon Road Coeburn, VA 24230-9740 Tel: (276) 395-3384 Fax: (276) 395-2043 http://flatwoods.jobcorps.gov Old Dominion Job Corps Center 1073 Father Judge Road Monroe, VA 24574 Tel: (434) 929-4081 Fax: (434) 929-0812 http://olddominion.jobcorps.gov Boys Home – Covington, VA www.boyshomeinc.org/ Hopetree Academy – Salem, VA https://hopetreefs.org/childrens-youth-services/hopetree-academy/ Skills USA http://www.skillsusa.org/ 703-777-8810 SkillsUSA is a partnership of students, teachers and industry working together to ensure America has a skilled workforce. SkillsUSA helps each student excel. Year Up National Capital Region- Washington, DC/Virginia Phone: (703) 312-9327 http://www.yearup.org/locations/main.php?page=natl_capital Year Up empowers urban talent to reach their potential through a one-year, intensive training program that provides low-income young adults, ages 18-24, with a combination of hands-on skill development, college credits, and corporate internships.

WASHINGTON

Cascades Job Corps Center 7782 Northern State Road PO Box 819 Sedro-Woolley, WA 98284 Tel: (360) 854-3400 Fax: (360) 854-2227 http://cascades.jobcorps.gov Columbia Basin Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center 6739 24th Street, Bldg. 2402 Moses Lake, WA 98837-3246 Tel: (509) 762-5581 Fax: (509) 793-1758 http://columbiabasin.jobcorps.gov Curlew Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center 3 Campus Street Curlew, WA 99118 Tel: (800) 513-4884 Fax: (509) 779-0718 http://curlew.jobcorps.gov Fort Simcoe Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center 40 Abella Lane White Swan, WA 98952 Tel: (509) 874-2244 Fax: (509) 874-2342 http://fortsimcoe.jobcorps.gov Year Up – Puget Sound/Seattle – Washington Phone: (206) 441-4465 http://www.yearup.org/locations/main.php?page=seattle Year Up empowers urban talent to reach their potential through a one-year, intensive training program that provides low-income young adults, ages 18-24, with a combination of hands-on skill development, college credits, and corporate internships.

WEST VIRGINIA

Charleston Job Corps Center 1000 Kennawa Drive Charleston, WV 25311 Tel: (304) 925-3200 Fax: (304) 925-7127 http://charleston.jobcorps.gov Harpers Ferry Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center 146 Buffalo Drive Harpers Ferry, WV 25425 Tel: (304) 728-5708 Fax: (304) 728-8200 http://harpersferry.jobcorps.gov West Virginia Mountaineer Challenge Academy 1-800-529-7700

WISCONSIN

Wisconsin Challenge Academy 608-269-9000 Blackwell Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center 4155 County Highway H Laona, WI 54541-9293 Tel: (715) 674-2311 Fax: (715) 674-7640 http://blackwell.jobcorps.gov Milwaukee Job Corps Center 6665 N. 60th Street Milwaukee, WI 53223 Tel: (414) 353-5914 Fax: (414) 353-5919 http://milwaukee.jobcorps.gov Family Services of Northeast Wisconsin http://www.familyservicesnew.org/ Family Services of Northeast Wisconsin -Coming Home Project http://www.familyservicesnew.org/coming-home/ An after-school and summer program that targets minority and at-risk youth to provide educational support and recreational activities. Family Services of Northeast Wisconsin -Day Treatment http://www.familyservicesnew.org/day-treatment/ Provides intensive counseling services to youth who are exhibiting severe behavioral or emotional problems. Family Services of Northeast Wisconsin -Ethan Group Homes http://www.familyservicesnew.org/ethan-house/ Provides a temporary living arrangement for boys, ages 12-17, who are court-ordered into placement or referred from the county or state due to behavioral, emotional or legal issues. Family Services of Northeast Wisconsin -Transitions http://www.familyservicesnew.org/transitions/ Provides employability and life skills training to youth at Lincoln Hills that are transitioning back home. Family Services of Northeast Wisconsin- WIA Older Youth Program http://www.familyservicesnew.org/wia-older-youth/ An intervention program for at-risk youth, ages 19-21, designed to improve the skills of our local workforce.

WYOMING

Wyoming Youth Challenge 307-836-7500 </h4georgia<>

Mercy Housing

https://www.mercyhousing.org/ A national nonprofit organization. Mercy Housing is one of the nation’s largest affordable housing organizations. We participate in the development, preservation, management and/or financing of affordable, program-enriched housing across the country. Mercy Housing serves a variety of populations with housing projects for low-income families, seniors and people with special needs. We acquire and renovate existing housing, as well as develop new affordable rental properties. We develop, finance and operate affordable, program-enriched housing communities for families, seniors and people with special needs who lack the economic resources to access quality, safe housing opportunities.

Low Income Housing

http://www.lowincome.org/ Free online database featuring thousands of low income housing, apartments and section 8 units across the United States.

Carrfour

http://carrfour.org/ Carrfour Supportive Housing is a nonprofit organization established in 1993 by the Homeless Committee of the Greater Miami Chamber of Commerce. Carrfour develops, operates and manages innovative housing communities for individuals and families in need through a unique approach combining affordable housing with comprehensive, on-site supportive services. As the leading not-for-profit provider of supportive housing in Florida, Carrfour has supplied homes for more than 10,000 formerly homeless men, women and children since its founding.

Shelter Listings

http://www.shelterlistings.org/ Shelter Listings is dedicated to serving the homeless and low-income. Our shelter list consists of over 4,000 listings and includes emergency shelters, homeless shelters, day shelters, transitional housing, residential drug/alcohol rehabilitation programs and permanent affordable housing. We are dedicated to helping the homeless and low-income find the shelter they need. Shelter Listings is dedicated to serving the homeless and low-income. We have listed out the shelters and low cost housing services we have in New York, NY below. This list has homeless shelters, halfway houses, affordable housing, etc. The database consists of over 3,000 listings and includes emergency shelters, homeless shelters, day shelters, transitional housing, shared housing, residential drug alcohol rehabilitation programs and permanent affordable housing.

Nazareth Housing NYC

http://www.nazarethhousingnyc.org/ Nazareth Housing is committed to the promotion of housing stability and economic independence among poor families and youth of New York City, through the provisions of:
  • Emergency Family Shelter
  • Homelessness Prevention, Economic Security and Urgent Needs Assistance
  • Permanent Low-Income and Supportive Housing

NACA

www.naca.com Provides loans to low and moderate income people and those who are considered to be subprime borrowers.

National Low Income Housing Coalition

http://www.nlihc.org/template/index.cfm

211 – United Way Airs

http://www.211us.org/ 2-1-1 is an easy to remember telephone number that, where available, connects people with important community services and essential human services like training, employment, food pantries, help for an aging parent, addiction prevention programs for their teenage children, affordable housing options, support groups and ways of becoming part of their community. Call 211 for emergency help with affordable housing and basic human needs, referrals to human services for every day needs and in times of crisis.

HOPE Coalition America

www.operationhope.org/hope-coalition-america HOPE Coalition America is the national partner with FEMA around emergency financial disaster preparedness, response and recovery, or the “economic Red Cross” for the nation. HCA responded to and served more than 200,000 survivors following Hurricane Katrina, and we are responding to Hurricane Sandy now.

Women’s Shelters

http://www.womenshelters.org/ Nationwide directory of shelters for women including homeless shelters, family shelters, residential treatment centers, transitional housing other women’s assistance resources.

HELP Central

www.helpcentral.org/ Phone: 1-800-311-7999 HELP USA is one of the largest providers of domestic violence housing in the New York metropolitan area with a total of 100 units of housing at three residences specifically dedicated to survivors of domestic abuse. In addition, HELP USA has developed 25 residences across the country, in New York City and upstate New York, Philadelphia, Houston, and Las Vegas. On-site comprehensive services include childcare, counseling, and employment activities. Residents are given the tools to lead independent, violence-free lives.

Fresh Start for Families

www.freshstartfamilyservices.com/ Fresh Start for Families is an employment program that helps domestic abuse survivors and their families make the transition from welfare to work. For survivors of domestic violence, the need for confidentiality, unmet childcare needs, and lack of education and work experience often pose a barrier to employment. Fresh Start for Families addresses any issues that interfere with job placement and retention.

Safe Horizon Hotline

www.safehorizon.org/ 1-800-621-HOPE Safe Horizon is the nation’s leading nonprofit victim assistance, advocacy, and violence prevention organization with more than 80 programs throughout New York and a staff of 800 dedicated professionals. NYCHA has partnered with Safe Horizon for more than 20 years to ensure that NYCHA residents who report domestic violence victimization receive the emotional and practical support they need.

Safe Horizon Community Offices

www.safehorizon.org/ Brooklyn: 718-834-6688 Bronx: 718-933-1000 Manhattan: 212-316-2100 Queens: 718-899-1233 Staten Island: 718-720-2591

SHINE (Safe Housing In a New Environment)

Phone: 212.695.4758 SHINE (operated by Women In Need) is a supportive housing program with intensive supportive services for women who have been victims of domestic abuse. Families at risk for domestic violence receive counseling and education in the shelters and are linked to resources that they may require such as assistance in accessing safe homes and battered women’s shelters, medical and psychiatric services, therapeutic services for children and legal advocacy. Scattered site apartments with access to social services help at risk women and their families who have completed the WIN shelter programs to continue their renewal and reach their goal of living independently.

Covenant House “Nineline

1-800-999-9999 1-800-999-9915 www.covenanthouse.org/ Covenant House, which serves runaway and homeless youth, operates this hotline for kids and parents with any kind of problem.

Girls and Boys Town Hotline

1-800-448-3000 1-800-448-1833 www.boystown.org/ Crisis, resource and referral line staffed by trained counselors available to anyone at any time.

National Center for Missing and Exploited Children

www.missingkids.com/ 1-800-THE-LOST (1-800-843-5678) For families and law enforcement agencies reporting a missing child and seeking search assistance; people reporting the sighting of a missing child or child exploitation; professionals seeking resources.

National Child Abuse Hotline

www.childhelp.org/hotline 1-800-4-A-CHILD (1-800-422-4453) A hotline for parents, children, professionals, and anyone concerned about child abuse.

National Domestic Violence Hotline

www.thehotline.org/ 1-800-799-SAFE (7233) 1-800-787-3224 A hotline for victims of domestic and family violence at home, and concerned family and friends.

National Hopeline Network

www.hopeline.com/ 1-800-SUICIDE (784-2433) This national crisis hotline network connects people who are depressed or suicidal, or those who are concerned about someone they love, automatically to a CONTACT USA or AAS certified crisis center.

National Runaway Switchboard

www.1800runaway.org/ 1-800-621-4000 For runaway youth, teens in crisis, and concerned friends and family members.

National Sexual Assault Hotline

www.rainn.org/ 1-800-656-HOPE (1-800-656-4673) This hotline connects sexual assault victims to local rape crisis centers.

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline

www.suicidepreventionlifeline.org/ 1-800-273-TALK (8255) The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline’s mission is to provide immediate assistance to individuals in suicidal crisis by connecting them to the nearest available suicide prevention and mental health service provider.

Domestic Violence Resources

home.nyc.gov/html/ocdv/

HELP R.O.A.D.S.

http://newyorkcity.ny.networkofcare.org/mh/services/agency.aspx?pid=HELPROADSDomesticViolenceProgram_754_2_0 1-800-621-HOPE HELP R.O.A.D.S. (Reaching Out to Advocate for Domestic Abuse Survivors) is a non-residential advocacy center serving domestic violence survivors in New York.

HELP USA

www.helpusa.org/ A non-profit organization whose mission is to help those who are homeless and others in need become and remain self-reliant.
(BPT) – No matter your age, you can help keep your body healthy and your money out of the health care system by eating right, exercising and avoiding habits that contribute to chronic illness. Having the appropriate insurance may also help your bottom line more than you think. Follow this guide to see if you have what you need at various stages in life.

20s

Younger people tend to have fewer medical issues, but that doesn’t mean you should ditch health insurance altogether. To save money while making sure you’re covered, consider a qualified high-deductible plan. Also known as a catastrophic health plan, this type of insurance typically covers costs for serious illness or unexpected accidents. But you’re responsible for minor or routine expenses. You’ll pay a lower monthly premium and a higher deductible than with a traditional plan. “It also comes with a powerful triple tax benefit: Not only are contributions tax-deductible, but earnings and qualified withdrawals are tax-free, too,” says J.J. Montanaro, a certified financial planner at USAA. Here’s another option: If you’re an unmarried dependent who doesn’t have access to employer-sponsored health care, you can stay on your parents’ health plan until you turn 26.

30s

Consider broadening your coverage. You may want to supplement your regular health insurance with accident insurance. It can help cover emergency treatment and related expenses, such as transportation and lodging, if you or covered family members are injured. While a health plan may cover much of your treatment costs, a critical illness plan typically pays a lump-sum benefit if you’re diagnosed with a significant illness or suffer a heart attack or stroke. It may provide extra money for things like child care and housecleaning while you’re on the mend. “The benefits provided by accident and critical illness insurance help take away the financial stress so you can focus on recovering,” says Greg Galdau, USAA assistant vice president of health solutions. Health insurance can pay some of your medical bills, but what about the income you could lose if you become seriously sick or are injured and can’t work? That’s what disability insurance is for. Your employer may provide some coverage, but it usually isn’t portable, so consider a personal policy you can take with you if you quit or lose your job. Consider a flexible spending account. Your employer may offer one of these tax-advantaged plans that let you use pretax dollars to pay for medical expenses and dependent care, too.

40s

While it’s smart to begin saving for retirement in your 20s, most people start to focus a little more on the specifics once their 40s roll around. “As you start crunching the numbers more seriously, be sure to factor health care costs into your assumptions about your spending needs in retirement,” Galdau says. Out-of-pocket expenses for a 65-year-old couple could suck hundreds of thousands of dollars from a retirement nest egg, according to the Employee Benefit Research Institute. Start learning about long-term care insurance. If you equate long-term care insurance with nursing home coverage, think again. While it can cover those costs, it generally does something even more appealing – help give you the resources you need to stay in your home.

50s

Stop putting off long-term care insurance. Long-term care expenses can pose a real threat to your retirement savings and lifestyle. This insurance can be flexible in its design – you can typically vary the features of the policy to stay within a budget while still reducing risk to your assets. If you’ve become a caregiver for a parent or other family member, tap into information resources such as care.com or those provided by the National Alliance for Caregiving to make your role as easy as possible.

60s

Don’t go without. If you retire early and lack employer-provided health insurance, don’t be tempted to cut costs and skip insurance until you’re eligible for Medicare at 65. Consider buying an individual policy to bridge the gap, if you have no other option. To avoid making important decisions under pressure, learn about your Medicare choices well before you have to make them.
Children’s Health Insurance Program CHIP is a program administered by the United States Department of Health and Human Services that provides matching funds to states for health insurance to families with children. The program was designed to cover uninsured children in families with incomes that are modest but too high to qualify for Medicaid. HRSA – U.S. Department of Health and Human Services – Health Resources and Services Headquarters: 5600 Fishers Lane Rockville, MD 20857 Federally-funded health centers care for everyone whether you have health insurance or not. You pay based on your income whatever you can afford. Health centers provide checkups, treatment, pre-natal care, immunizations, dental care, prescriptions, mental health and substance abuse care. MedPoint Express 615 N. Michigan St South Bend, IN 46601 Phone: 800-635-5516 Medpoint Express clinics treat minor health problems when you are unable to visit a doctor. No appointment is needed, prices are affordable. There are no hidden fees; the cost for each service is listed on the menu in the front of the clinic. Treatment is provided by a nurse practitioner who has extensive training in family medicine. Minute Clinic Phone: 866-389-2727 E-mail: customercare@minuteclinic.com Minute Clinics offer top-quality health care, quick appointments if needed, affordable treatments and convenient hours and locations. Board-certified practitioners diagnose and treat a variety of common illnesses. Patients are responsible for their co-pay or pay treatment price listed on services menu. Red Clinics General Information 9 E. Greenway Plaza, Suite 2950 Houston, TX 77046 Phone: 1.866.607.Redi (7334) or 713.935.0333 RediClinic’s treat common conditions and provide health screenings, immunizations. high-quality, affordable healthcare for routine conditions and preventive care with no waiting and no appointments necessary. A range of preventive services are available including screening tests, immunizations, and basic physical exams. In addition, most common blood tests including screenings for high cholesterol, diabetes, heart disease, liver and kidney function, thyroid disease, allergies, and prostatic specific antigen (PSA) are available. Solantic 8711 Perimeter Park Blvd. Suite 6 Jacksonville, FL 32216 Phone: 1-866-SOLANTIC or 904-223-2320 Fax: 904-223-3149 Solantic provides convenient healthcare and great customer service at fair prices. On-site medical professionals share provide expert medical care in a timely and efficient manner. Walgreens Take Care Clinic Phone: 1-866-Take-Care (1-866-825-3227) Walgreens Take Care Clinics provide quality family healthcare. Services and treatments include adult vaccinations, skin conditions, diagnostic testing, respiratory illness, minor injuries, and physicals, From treatment for minor cuts and scrapes to adult vaccinations, we provide a wide range of healthcare services. Walmart Clinics Independent health clinics offer healthcare services to customers in select Walmart stores nationwide. These clinics provide one-stop convenience for many basic healthcare needs at affordable prices. All clinics offer preventative and routine health services for common health problems and screening needs that can be performed without urgent or emergency care. No appointments are necessary, patient data is electronic, and the average cost is $65 or less. Arkansas-Walmart Clinics 3919 N. Mall Ave Fayetteville, AR 72703 Clinic Information: CareExpress Northwest Health System Phone: 479-521-5980 4208 Pleasant Crossing Rogers, AR 72758 Clinic Information: CareExpress Northwest Health System Phone: 479-246-0713 California – Walmart Clinics 40580 Albrae Street Fremont, CA 94538 Clinic Information: Quick Health Phone: 510-657-8800 755 River Point Court West Sacramento, CA 95605 Clinic Information: Quick Health Phone: 916-372-7200 4625 Redwood Dr Rohnert Park, CA 94928 Clinic Information: Quick Health Phone: 707-584-3001 Florida – Walmart Clinics 3801 Turtle Creek Dr Coral Springs, FL 33067 Clinic Information: North Broward Express Aid Phone: 954-752-1457 1471 East Osceola Pkwy Kissimmee (E), FL 34744 Clinic Information: Solantic Phone: 407-452-3700 3001 N. State Rd #7 Lauderdale Lakes, FL 33313 Clinic Information: North Broward Express Aid Phone: 954-486-3753 11250 E. Colonial Dr Orlando (E), FL 32817 Clinic Information: Solantic Phone: 321-354-0112 464016 State Road 200 Yulee, FL 32097 Clinic Information: Solantic Phone: 904-261-3913 Indiana – Walmart Clinics 8300 East 96th St Fishers, IN 46038 Clinic Information: Med Point Express Phone: 800-635-5516 10617 E. Washington Indianapolis, IN 76229 Clinic Information: Med Point Express Phone: 800-635-5516 316 Indian Ridge Road Mishawaka, IN 46545 Clinic Information: Med Point Express Phone: 574-647-1690 16865 Clover Road Noblesville, IN 46060 Clinic Information: Med Point Express Phone: 317-770-7388 2400 Morthland Dr Valparaiso, IN 46383 Clinic Information: Med Point Express Phone: 800-635-5516 Missouri – Walmart Clinics 3315 S Campbell Springfield, MO 65807 Clinic Information: CoxHealth Phone: 417-886-2219 Texas – Walmart Clinics 1381 S. Main St. Boerne, TX 78006 Clinic Information: Christus Medical Group Phone: 830-249-9424 150 West Eldorado Blvd. Friendswood, TX 77546 Clinic Information: Christus Medical Group Phone: 281-280-0986 1701 West FM 646 League City, TX 77573 Clinic Information: Christus Medical Group Phone: 281-337-5430 155 Louetta Crossing Spring, TX 77373 Clinic Information: Christus Medical Group Phone: 281-528-0278 255 FM 518 Kemah, TX 77565 Clinic Information: Christus Medical Group Phone: 281-535-2439 1710 Broadway St. Pearland, TX 77581 Clinic Information: Christus Medical Group Phone: 281-648-1296 Wisconsin – Walmart Clinics 1415 Lawrence Drive De Pere, WI 54115 Clinic Information: Aurora Quick Care Phone: 920-339-4328 2440 West Mason Street Green Bay, WI 54303 Clinic Information: Aurora Quick Care Phone: 920-499-5917 250 East Wolf Run Mukwonago, WI 53149 Clinic Information: Aurora Quick Care Phone: 262-363-4751 351 South Washburn St. Oshkosh, WI 54904 Clinic Information: Aurora Quick Care Phone: 920-232-0718 411 Pewaukee Road Pewaukee, WI 53072 Clinic Information: Aurora Quick Care Phone: 262-695-4439 3711 S Taylor Drive Sheboygan, WI 53081 Clinic Information: Aurora Quick Care Phone: 920-457-2915 Hill-Burton Hospitals The Hill-Burton program provides free or low cost health care via government money to those who are eligible based on income at participating hospitals across the country.
BenefitsCheckUp.org Helps seniors find health care benefits available to them CDC.gov Information on free or low cost colorectal cancer screening Enfamil.com Free goodies for new mothers and their babies InsureKidsNow.gov Info on state programs for free or low cost health insurance for children Kidney.org Information on free or low cost kidney evaluation screening PlanForYourHealth.com Guide to free or low cost health insurance PPARX.org Info about free and low cost medicine programs UBCF.Info Free breast cancer screenings information UniteForSight.org List of free clinics in the United States UnitedProject.org Free Health Benefits for posting health related issues
American Well 75 State Street, 26th Floor Boston, MA 02109 Phone: 617-204-3500 Fax: 617-261-0200 American Well provides a setting where consumers and physicians come together online, to acquire and provide convenient and immediate healthcare services. American Well supports health plans in meeting consumer needs for affordable, efficient, and immediate access to quality care. Askadoctor.com AskADoctor.com is an on-line resource for fast, accurate, and discreet answers to your medical questions. Each question is answered by three different AskADoctor.com Affiliate Physicians giving you different points of view to discuss with your own Doctor. Submit your question and receive answers from three (3) separate Physicians from the specialty you select, usually within a few hours. EhealthInsurance Customer Care Center 11919 Foundation Pl Gold River, CA 95670 Phone: 800-977-8860 EHealthInsurance provides consumers with information about health insurance plans with a selection of price and benefit options. Customer Service is available via a toll free number, online chat, email or fax, to answer consumer questions throughout the process of buying and using health insurance. Hello Health 105 Berry Street, Brooklyn, NY 11211 Phone: 1-877-610-0119 Hello Health offers patients video chats, texting, instant messaging and e-mails between doctors and patients. There’s a $35 monthly fee, and each chat, IM session or phone session costs $50 to $100. Quick e-mails are free, and longer ones cost $150 an hour. Regular in-person office visits cost $150 to $200, and house calls cost $150 to $200. Justanswer.com JustAnswer is the largest website where people come when they want a Doctor, Lawyer, Mechanic or other Expert to answer their questions personally and quickly, 24/7. For a small fee, 15,000,000 registered users have access to approximately 20,000 Experts. In addition, you pick the price you want to pay. MyMedicalCosts.com P.O.Box 18417 Anaheim, CA 92817-8417 Phone: 800-646-0944 Email: support@mymedicalcosts.com MyMedicalCosts.com is a free, nonprofit website connecting patients and healthcare providers in an efficient manner to access the best quality healthcare at the lowest possible cost. MyMedicalCosts.com gathers all of your medical pricing and information on health care providers using both public and private sources.

Foundations Offering Assistance

Heart Disease Heart Support of America Kidney Disease American Kidney Fund Hepatitis The Access Project Rare Diseases National Organization for Rare Diseases Vision Care EyeCare America and Vision USA Prescription Assistance Healthwell Foundation The Access Project FamilyWize Discount Drug Card Needy Meds Rx Assist Rx Hope Chronic Disease Fund Partnership for Prescription Assistance

Needy Meds

NeedyMeds provides information on programs that help people facing problems paying for medications and health care; to assist those in need in applying to programs; and to provide health-related education using innovative methods. Free/Low-Cost/Sliding-Scale Clinics The clinics in this database are free, low cost with a sliding scale based on income, or offer some type of financial assistance. Disease Resource Pages
Quick “Effortless” Weight Loss Tips To Get You Started
  • Keep a food journal
  • Drink green or black tea daily
  • Take it one day at a time
  • Exercise at least 3 times a week
  • Plan your meals ahead of time – have healthy foods ready to avoid temptation
  • Start with small changes – swap whole milk with fat free milk, eat fruit Instead of drinking juice
  • Eat a high protein diet
  • Walk or run as much as you can
  • Drink lots of water
  • Eat a sandwich or portioned meal – automatic portion control
  • Don’t beat yourself up if you fall off the wagon – just get back on with the next meal or the next day
  • Eat breakfast to get your metabolism going
  • Weigh yourself regularly – once a week
  • Reduce carb intake gradually
  • Substitute whole grains for white bread, white pasta and cereals
  • Fight chocolate cravings with low fat hot chocolate or chocolate milk
Exercise is an essential part of any weight loss plan. But, sometimes funds are short so you have to get creative and resourceful. You don’t have to join a gym and pay monthly membership fees and you don’t need to buy expensive equipment for an effective workout. You can use what you have at your disposal at home. Here are some great ways to get fit for free or on the cheap! As with all health-related matters, make sure to consult a doctor before embarking on any fitness plan. WALKING Walking is the exercise anyone can do and it’s one of the easiest ways to get fit. Each step you take means you burn more calories and burning more calories means you are doing a great thing for your health and body. Studies show that walking is a great form of exercise. You can do it anywhere and fit it into your fitness plan. Walk at your park, around the block, in the mall. If you drive, then park your car at a distance from your destination to fit in a brisk walk. Turn it up a notch and go hiking if you can find a convenient trail. JUMPING JACKS Jumping Jacks are a fun form of cardio and a good warm up for your workout as well. You can even squeeze them in when you’re watching TV –during commercials do a round of jumping jacks to burn some calories. PUSHUPS Pushups are not everyone’s favorite exercise but there’s no disputing their effectiveness. They build arm strength along with working your chest area muscles. There are also a few ways to do them for any fitness level. You can do them on your knees instead of keeping legs straight. Or even do them standing up against a wall. Do what works for you. Squeeze in a few sets while watching TV. RUNNING Running is one of the most popular forms of exercise. Not only can you do it for free and just about anywhere, but it gives your whole body a full workout, promoting overall toning and weight loss and results are visible faster than many other exercises. Figure out a routine that makes sense for you – location, distance, frequency per week and intensity. If you’re a beginner take baby steps, determine what your abilities are and gradually increase distance, your pace, length and frequency of your run. BIKING If you have the means to buy a quality bike, then it’s a great investment in your fitness. The fitness benefits are tremendous. A great form of cardio—it tones and conditions and strengthens your body. Biking is a good alternative to running as it involves circular movement without putting undue pressure on your spine. SIT UPS Crunches/Sit ups are great for building and strengthening abdominal muscles. Squeeze in a few sets while watching TV, when you wake up in the morning, or before you go to bed. Really, sit ups can fit into any busy schedule. If you’re a newbie, your head doesn’t need to go all the way up. Make sure you’re raising your head and shoulders until you feel the stretching of the muscles, a slight burn and you will see benefits. SQUATS Squats work wonders for your lower body– your legs and buttocks. If you’re just getting started, do chair squats where you barely sit in a chair, then stand up and repeat a few times. Do a few repetitions and your body will reap the benefits. LUNGES Lunges are great for toning your legs. Do them standing in place, alternating one leg forward then stepping back into place or do them down a hallway. You will feel the intense burn in your legs. As you progress, you can add weights. LEG LIFTS Leg Lifts are awesome for building up strength and muscles in your legs. You can do them anywhere. Depending on your fitness level, you may need to slightly bend your legs and then eventually straighten your legs over time. JOGGING Jogging is similar to walking is many ways, just a slightly faster pace and you see results that much faster. Like walking, you can jog almost everywhere — parks, streets and even in place. Jogging in place is wonderful for your heart. Jog in place while watching TV or listening to music. All you need are the right sneakers to prevent stress to your legs. DANCING Dancing is one of the best ways to burn calories, and get your heart rate going while having fun. Just play your favorite music at home and start dancing. It lifts your spirits and gives you an overall sense of well-being. From the privacy of your home you don’t have to be a pro. Just dance to heart’s content any way you choose. WEIGHT TRAINING There’s nothing like weight lifting when you want to build stronger muscles. If you don’t have a set of weights, you can replace them with full water bottles, milk jugs, a bag of groceries, canned goods, laundry detergent – whatever you have at your disposal. Make sure you do your research on how to correctly perform weight exercises. JUMP ROPE Jumping rope will give you some solid cardio in a matter of minutes. It can be more challenging then you realize. So start at a pace that’s comfortable for you and gradually work your way up over time. Guaranteed you’ll start feeling the burn in your legs the next day. AEROBICS – DVDs/VIDEOS To add variety to your workouts, there are tons of options in various forms of media to take advantage of. To mix things up and to avoid boredom, you have your choice of renting exercise videos from the library, doing exercise programs on TV and cable or even workout videos on YouTube. Many of these videos are instructional, so it’s a great option especially if you need guidance with doing specific workouts: weight training, pushups, squats, crunches, Yoga, Pilates or Zoomba etc. The choices out there are limitless so you can really vary your workout routine. STAIRS/STEP EXERCISES Take the stairs whenever you can. Instead of taking the elevator or escalator, take the stairs. Go up and down them a few times if you can at home. Doing repetitions will really tone your leg muscles. If stairs aren’t available, step up and down on a sturdy chair or a big book, while watching TV or listening to music. It may not work up a sweat like other forms of cardio, but it will help tone your legs and it’s an easy, low-impact form of aerobics to keep your body active and healthy. HOUSEHOLD CHORES Household chores are also a good way to burn calories. Chores can be very physical and a good way to fit in some cardio. Vacuuming, mowing the lawn, mopping, raking the leaves, snow shoveling, dusting the house, cleaning the windows, organizing a room, maintaining a yard are all good ways to get your blood pumping. You don’t have to break the bank to exercise. You can get fit on any budget. These options show how to be creative and resourceful, help you reach your fitness goals and save you money in the process.
1. Lift weights twice a week to increase your muscle mass. This muscle will burn more calories even when you are not exercising. Go to the gym, buy some weights for home, go for a walk with a bottle of water in your ruck sack or go to a weighted workout. 2. Take care of your heart and lungs by staying active for at least 30 minutes each day. This can be split into more than one session, so could mean 2 x 15 minute walks. 3. Eat small amounts of GOOD fats: avocado, oily fish, olive/flax oil, nuts and seeds, these will take care of your cardiovascular system (heart, arteries and veins). Eat less BAD fats: Fried food, meat, cakes, chocolate, crisps, biscuits, butter, these will harm your cardiovascular system, and make you fat. Remove ALL hydrogenated fats from your diet, they are very bad for you and hide in many ready made biscuits, cakes, crisps, puddings, sweets, chocolates. These fats are extremely harmful to your health. Avoiding them will help you avoid foods which are high in fat, sugar and salt and low in nutrients. Check labels. 4. Protein will make you feel full, and will help repair muscle after exercise. Try sourcing protein from skinless chicken, tofu, pulses (beans and peas) and oily fish such as salmon, fresh tuna and mackerel; these also contain other beneficial ingredients and are low in bad saturated fats. 5. Make sure you eat your carbohydrates, they help you to exercise and burn fat, but eat SLOW BURN carbohydrates such as oats (porridge), brown bread instead of white, brown rice, honey instead of sugar, brown pasta, lentils, vegetables, pulses. If you want to loose body fat, then replace half your carbohydrates with steamed vegetables, at your evening meal. 6. Drink more water, often the body sends the same signal for thirst as for hunger. Drink water first thing in the morning and all through the day, especially during and after exercising. Cut down on tea and coffee, avoid fizzy drinks. 7. Eat a piece of fruit and drink water instead of drinking fruit juice which is high in calories, and difficult to digest. 8. Watch out for sports drinks. Unless you are training very hard, a bottle of sports drink may replace all of the calories you have just burned in your activity. Bring a bottle of water instead. 9. Keep an eye on your drinking! Alcohol and mixers are high in calories. 10. Do not get hungry; this will lead to you eating the wrong things. Carry healthy snacks wherever you go; bananas, apples, rice cakes, dried fruit and nuts (go easy on them though). Hunger can be triggered by boredom or lack of stimulation. Go for a walk or wander round the garden, or do the vacuuming. Eat 5 small meals a day rather than 3 big ones. 11. Look at your portion sizes; in general they are larger than they need to be. If a smaller portion will leave you feeling hungry, add a huge spoon of steamed broccoli, cauliflower or other vegetables. 12. Eat your breakfast. In tests people who eat breakfast loose more weight than those who do not. You cannot exercise efficiently and achieve your potential without eating properly. 13. Do not go shopping when you are hungry. When you go, write a list and stick to it, don’t be tempted by special offers on foods that you know are bad for you. 14. Look at the ingredients on everything that you buy. Look at the total amount of fat and what kind of fat- avoid saturated fats and hydrogenated fats as they are linked with developing heart disease. Look at the amount of calories and the amount of salt that you will be eating. In general the more ingredients on a label, the less goodness is in the food. If you have time to prepare some meals with fresh ingredients you will improve your health, and probably cut down on fat, as most prepared food is high in fats and salt. 15. Beware of reduced fat labels- it only means that there is less fat than in the original thing. (For example reduced fat mayonnaise is still 50g fat per 100g- very high in fat). These foods are still often high in sugars, fat and calories and you may eat more of them because they appear to be healthy. Don’t buy reduced fat biscuits and cakes, just eat something healthier and get used to the fact that life is ok without those things. 16. Don’t fill the house with crisps, biscuits and sweets for the kids, it is no good for them and will encourage you to snack on them too. Try and move the whole family into healthier eating, this will help prevent obesity, heart disease and diabetes in your kids when they are your age, gift them with a long, quality life. 17. Stock up on healthy foods. Write a list of delicious healthy things that you may have forgotten you love, and make sure your cupboards are full of them; cherry tomatoes, baked beans on wholemeal bread, kiwis, mangoes, ryvita and marmite…… 18. Make your lunch and take it to work. Buy whole grain rolls and tins of salmon and tuna- it only takes a few minutes to make a sandwich and pick up some fruit. Even a shop sandwich will be full of fat, and low in nutrients. Hold the mayo on the tuna! 19. Watch less TV: it will give you less chance to nibble, more time to exercise or organise yourself for the next day. Organization may be the key to making your lifestyle healthier. 20. Motivate yourself to change your lifestyle and that of your family. Set an example to the kids, that mum and dad are fit and active and healthy. Take them on walks, cycling, walk to the shops, and go swimming. Take them to a local fitness centre for football, dance or basketball. Our children need our help if they are to avoid the growing epidemic of obesity, heart disease and diabetes, as well as other lifestyle-related illness. Change their eating habits; you will only do them good. LEAD BY EXAMPLE. 21. Buy yourself an exercise video to do at home instead of watching TV. Choose yoga or Pilates, aerobics or stability ball. There is a huge range on offer, talk to me for help. Buy yourself a healthy lifestyle magazine for motivation, recipes and exercises to do at home. Four good ones are Zest, Men’s Health, Ultra Fit, and Health and Fitness. Buy yourself a healthy eating or low fat cookbook for ideas. 22. Remember to have some treats and some fun, life is for living, being healthy should be enjoyable too, not a chore. 23. Slow down, stop rushing around, become more organised and make time to enjoy cooking, exercising and life in general. 24. Take some time to relax and unwind. You need to lower stress levels to stay healthy, exercise, Yoga and Pilates can help you do this, and so can a warm bath by candlelight. 25. Make exercise and healthy eating a normal and enjoyable part of every day of your life. You will live longer, protect your children’s health and be a happier, healthier person. I hope that this gives you some motivation to change your life in small ways and reap large benefits. Until next time, Vikki. Do you have any friends and family who could benefit from getting fitter and feeling better? If you do, then treat them to free copy of this newsletter, forward it to them, and get them to e-mail me with a request. E-mail getfitter@yahoo.co.uk subject: newsletter request. article source: adzines.com
You’re in all probability bored with your home made meals, and want to travel to a restaurant for a switch. On the other hand, your physician has well-advised you not to consume restaurant foods as it may have an outcome of weight gain for you. You plainly don’t know which direction to go, correct? In this content I’ll tell you tips on losing weight even when consuming restaurant food while at the same time making a point that you don’t get any more rounded. Here is a guideline for you: if a particular food tastes excessively good, it implies it may have been deep fried, and in and of itself, not beneficial for your wellness. Amazingly enough, the raw vegetables and fruits, which commonly taste atrocious, are the most beneficial foods for speedy weight loss. 1. Travel to vegetarian eating places: In order to be on the secure side, visit eating places which offer simply vegetarian meals. This isn’t to state that non-vegan meals are sorry. With non-vegan restaurants, you have to consider extra care to make certain that you’re not consuming high-calorie or high-fat foods. As a model, ordinary chicken which is served in virtually all restaurants is commonly loaded with big amounts of fatty tissue which is unfit for you! Lean chicken, on the other side is beneficial for you, but not all restaurants provide lean chicken. With vegetarian eating places, you’ll be more frequently than not on the safety side. 2. Leave the salad dressing alone: you’ve heard it many times that salads are beneficial for fast weight loss. The grounds behind this are that salads are nothing but raw vegetables in sliced form. Raw vegetables, as you may be well aware, help you burn fat by supercharging your metabolism. But, the dressing that’s supplied in most restaurants is full of calories. So if you ask for salads, make certain to apprize them to leave off the dressing. 3. Stand back from buffets: many foods you see at buffets are big calories. These foods are prepared in bulk with a big amount of oil, thereby making them improper for those who are looking to follow some tips on losing weight. If you truly want to eat buffets, make certain you cut out the fatty foods and select the salads and other sounder options alternatively. 4. Curb your servings: Check the amount of food you’re going to consume before you take in that morsel! If you think that the food supplied to you surmounts the portions you’re allowed, consume your portion limit then take the remnants back home to be eaten the following day. As long as you use your prudence, there’s nothing wrong with eating at a restaurant once in awhile. So go ahead and pacify your taste buds but follow these tips on losing weight as well! Click here for a source of losing weight tips and feel and look your best with tips on losing weight Author: Sharron L. Kegley Click here for a source of losing weight tips and feel and look your best with tips on losing weight

article source: adzines.com

Everyone who has ever tried to lose weight has hit a plateau at some point. A plateau is that point at which no matter what you do, you cannot seem to lose any more. If you have currently hit a weight loss plateau, there are a number of things that you can do to get going again on your road to successfully reaching your ideal weight. Here are some tried and true ideas to help you blast your way through your weight loss plataeu. Think long-term. Weight loss plateaus are best thought of as maintenance periods that will not last forever. Keep your eye on your long terms goals and keep going with your weight loss plan. Above all, be patient, the road to your ultimate weight goal is likely to be a long one that is achieved one small step at a time. Are you getting close to your ideal weight? One of the reasons that you may have hit a plateau is that you may be getting close to your ideal weight. The closer to this weight you get, the harder it will be to shed extra kilos. On the positive side, if your new lifestyle habits have become well entrenched you’ll also find it more difficult to put on weight, which means that you may be able to indulge a little bit and still stay at a healthy weight. If you aren’t already at your ideal weight here are a few suggestions that may be able to help you break through your weight loss plateau: Mix it up. This means trying something new that is still consistent with your weight loss plan. For example, if your primary exercise is walking, try substituting a couple of your morning walks for swims or bike rides. Likewise, try some different types of low fat foods for a couple of weeks to supplement what else you are eating. As well as helping you get through a plateau, mixing up your weight loss program can help to reinvigorate and energize you to persevere. It can also make life more fun and you might even learn something new about an interesting topic or about yourself. You may even discover something else that you truly love doing or eating. Eat Healthier. Some people lose without modifying their diet significantly. If you have lost weight but still aren’t eating healthily, maybe you should try to modify your diet a little. If you haven’t been eating many calories or eating little or no vegetables, try to get provide your body with extra nutrients through healthier foods. If you have been avoiding fats to lose weight, try eating foods that contain healthy fats for a while. It may be that your body is just missing something and this might be just the thing to get your through your plateau. Start Exercising. Some people lose weight without exercising. If this is you, then you should consider starting one immediately. Exercise is one of the few things that can provide a dramatic boost to your weight loss immediately. As well as losing weight, you’re sure to benefit in many other ways from exercising, like having a healthier heart. There are many excuses not to exercise. If you have reached a plateau in your weight loss program, then now is the perfect time to start. Just go outside and walk for 20 minutes a day. If you can run then run. If you can only walk, then walk. I guarantee you that this will help you break through almost any plateau. If you are already exercising and you’re “mixing it up” try to increase the intensity of your workouts (but do it s-l-o-w-l-y and carefully). Increasing the intensity at which you exercise will help increase your metabolism and burn more calories. Consider these options to help:
  • Hire a personal trainer for a few weeks
  • Walk or jog a little faster than usual
  • Do your weight training as circuit training
  • Look for opportunities to Walk instead of driving or catching elevators
Eat! A weight loss plateau may be a great time for you to just go out and eat whatever you want. This can help you forget about dieting and weight loss for a while and just enjoy yourself. One care free day of eating is not going to sabotage your whole plan. Just eat whatever you want and forget about calories, carbs and fat for a day. This may be just what your mind and body need to get back on track and help you achieve success. Summary Above are a few suggestions that should help you get through a weight loss plateau. Your best chance of success in getting through is to maintain a happy disposition while on your weight loss journey. If loosing weight is causing you stress and frustration, slow down. You don’t have to lose every pound this week, this month, or even this year. Think of it this way. The longer you take to lose the weight, the less chance you have of putting it back on. Many people who have lost large amounts of weight very quickly in the past have put the weight back on almost immediately. Just remember, a truly healthy lifestyle is one in which you eat, drink, exercise and be merry. If you develop the right habits, you can be happy, healthy and the perfect weight for you all without sacrificing the things you really love. For all your weight loss and healthy lifestyle needs, visit www.weightloss.com.au and become a happier, healthier you.

article source: adzines.com

No matter how ambitious your goal, you CAN achieve it. You do it by taking one little step at a time. Here are a few tips to help you: 1. Visualize Your Goal: The first step is to create a mental picture of your goal. Get very clear on what you want. Are you gaining a new skill? Hitting a new revenue goal? Landing a new important client? See and feel it. 2. Define Your Goal: Be very precise and write your goal down. Outline how much and by when. Add in specific information and resources (money, marketing materials, software, etc.) you will need to acquire to achieve your goal. 3. Post It: Put your goal in a place you can easily see it: next to your desk, on your mirror, in your wallet? Read it several times throughout each day. 4. Support: Who can help you achieve your goal? Who are your cheerleaders? List the people and companies you will need to contact for assistance. 5. Make a Plan: When a goal seems too big, we tend to procrastinate because it is too overwhelming. Breaking it down and focusing on one piece at a time makes large goals more attainable. Develop a series of action steps with dates attached. As you finish each task, check it off and acknowledge yourself. That’s it – five simple steps to achieve anything. As you move along, enjoy the journey. You are learning, growing, and accomplishing. Take time to appreciate your progress. Reaching a goal does not happen by accident. It is a series of intentional small steps, proper planning, and a stubborn commitment to make it happen. ACTION STEP: Why not begin right now? What do you really want to achieve? Write down your goal. You CAN do it! As Business Author and Entrepreneur Mark Victor Hansen says, “By recording your dreams and goals on paper, you set in motion the process of becoming the person you most want to be. Put your future in good hands – your own.” Wendy Maynard, your friendly marketing maven, is the owner of Kinesis (http://www.kinesisinc.com). Kinesis specializes in marketing, graphic and website design, and business writing. For more marketing tips, you can visit her blog, Kinetic Ideas at: http://www.wendy.kinesisinc.com You can also sign up for Kinesis Quickies, a free bi-monthly marketing e-newsletter. Learn more at http://www.news.kinesisinc.com article source: adzines.com
Goal-mapping is like a treasure hunt, you must first start out by knowing what you are looking for. Be very specific on what you want without limiting yourself. The next step is charting out what course of action you must take to get what you want. I encourage women to map out a treasure hunt on what they want in life, and to use that chart to reach their goals. That is exactly what I did to get my Ph.D. degree. I knew that I wanted to get my degree in psychology, and to write a book. My goal was to use my dissertation as a self-help book, and with the successful completion of my dissertation I could be awarded my degree. I enrolled in the Ph.D. program and completed all my core courses. It took a very long time, but I never gave up; persistence is the single most important aspect in attaining a goal. It was time for me to write my dissertation, and at this point I was scared and almost ready to give up because money was running out. I found a way to make ends meet while I could devote my time to finishing the book. While enduring the arduous task of writing I kept my vision and knew I had to be true to my goal. While most of my friends were supportive, many people in my life were not. I was ridiculed for even attempting such a grand task. I kept working on my book, and then one day I was on my last chapter. I turned it in; successfully defending it, and received my Ph.D. For me, my treasure was my Ph.D. degree. I kept following my directions to find my treasure and I got it! If I can do it, you can too. GOAL MAPPING 1. Be specific on what you want. 2. Do what is necessary to reach your goal. 3. Be persistent, don’t ever give up. Even if things look grim, look for solutions and ways to keep your vision. 4. Don’t let others discourage you, everyone feels fear, and everyone is criticized. The only difference is that the one who finds her treasure doesn’t let the fear and criticism stop her. 5. Stay on the map for the duration. It may be tempting to abandon the goal, or to go on a different hunt, but keep your focus and stay focused on your treasure. 6. When you find your treasure, open your box and accept your treasure graciously! About The Author Marla Sloane Ph.D., is a successful author and speaker. Her Positive Affirmations subscribers have reached world-wide proportions, and her book, “The Masks We Wear and How to Live Without Them” is at the heart of her teleclasses; From Ordinary to Extraordinary?Unmask Your Potential; teaching individuals how to remove limiting labels. Marla has also produced, Trilogy of Meditations, for your Mind, Body, and Spirit, which is distributed nationwide, and in Europe. You can contact Marla at: Marla@marlasloane.com You can visit her web site at: http://www.marlasloane.com.

article source: adzines.com

1. Stop seeking approval from people. You don’t need anyone’s permission to fulfill your dream. Trust yourself and give yourself permission to succeed. Having support from people whose opinion you value is a wonderful thing but it should not be the criterion for whether you begin acting on fulfilling your goals or not If you really desire to turn your idea into reality, constantly floating it around and seeking the approval of people will waste your time and kill your dream. What will happen to your idea if you don’t get the approval of those whose permission you so desperately need? Nothing! 2. Don’t wait for perfection. Waiting for a time when everything is perfect and in place will cause you to lose your enthusiasm and abandon your goal. Conditions may never be as perfect as you desire. You may never have all the money, time, or knowledge you desire to begin working on your goals. You must take risks, learn and improve as you go along and then watch as everything begins to fall in place. If you have to wait for the perfect time to begin working on your goals? You will be waiting a long time! 3. Create time for the goal. Many people have dreams, ideas or goals, which remain unfulfilled because they are too busy doing everything else but work on the goal! If you have a goal to accomplish, you must be ready to invest your time, and resources to ensure that it succeeds. Making excuses about lacking the time to work on goals that are important to you is a procrastination tactic, which will kill your dream before it has a chance to see the light of day. There is always time to work on what we love and consider important. Create that time and see your dreams begin to unfold! 4. Decide once and for all! The process of goal accomplishment, like most things in life begins with a decision. You decide what you want to achieve and then you plan how you intend to achieve it. If accomplishing your goal is important to you, your inability to make crucial decisions about what you should do, how you should do it and when you should do it, will waste your time and choke your dream. Make up your mind and stop second-guessing yourself. When your mind is made up? Nothing can stop you from making progress with fulfilling your goals. 5. Be bold and take the initiative. Be bold! You are the one in charge of turning your dreams to reality. You need to be proactive and actively involved in the process of working on your goals to ensure you achieve them. Just because you have shared your ideas with others does not necessarily mean that you are no longer responsible for turning them to reality. Don’t sit around waiting for others to make suggestions and guide your idea to reality. Don’t leave your dream entirely in the hands of others. Nobody cares about your dream like you do. 6. Invest in your dream. No idea is self-funding. Don’t be deceived into thinking that people will invest or finance your idea just because it is brilliant. If you are lucky, someone may invest in it, but if you are not, you will have to invest your time, energy and finances towards activities that will fortify and fulfill your dream. You may have to invest in the acquisition of knowledge or expertise that will help you achieve your goals. It would be a good idea to keep some money stashed away to finance your goal. 7. Do one thing at a time. Commit yourself only to projects and activities which are connected to your main goal. Whatever you do should directly or indirectly add up to a move toward your main goal. Failure to do this will confuse, overwhelm, sidetrack, and drain your energy. To get started on achieving your goals, you need to plan for it and make it a priority. If you keep crowding and cluttering your life with what does not matter, you many never, ever accomplish your goals. Remember that you can’t do all things, but you can do one thing! About The Author Caroline Jalango is a life coach for unstoppable women who are willing to step up to the plate and take a shot at living exceptional lives wherever they are. www.motivationzone.com Caroline@motivationzone.com article source: adzines.com
Know Your Self, Figure Out Who You are What You Want Know Your Passion. Let your passions run wild! Figure out your life purpose – it can be big or small. Set Clear Goals. Start drafting your master plan Don’t be Afraid to Dream. Be ambitious and believe in yourself or no one else will. If you’re not ambitious, you’ll lack the drive to follow through on your goals. Cultivate Confidence in Yourself Identify Weaknesses. Know what your weaknesses are so that you can be ready to tackle them. Identify your weakness so you can come up with a plan to counteract them. Figure Out What You Can Do Today and what you can do every day to bring you closer to your goals Visualize What You Want. This can be a very powerful technique to help you focus on achieving your goals. Start Taking Action Persistence. Persistence is key to getting what you want. But make sure you’re not persistent in pursuing the wrong things. You Must Stay Focused Achieve Your Dreams. If you stop focusing on your goals it won’t happen, it’s as simple as that. Success doesn’t happen overnight, but working towards the same goal consistently over a long period of time and you’ll succeed in the end. Don’t allow yourself to be distracted by new ideas that pop up. Allow yourself time to think and be creative, but keep coming back to your main goals and focus on them first Be Prepared to Work Hard. Fantasizing won’t get you anywhere. If you want to achieve your dreams, hard work is non-negotiable. Finish Your Projects. Don’t get in the habit of starting things and not finishing. Completing a project gives you a sense of accomplishment. Closure is satisfying and allows you to move on to new projects and challenges with a feeling of productivity. Reward and Congratulate Yourself on Your Successes Along the Way. It’s important to be motivated and acknowledge each achievement on the way to success. Look Forward to Achieving Your Goals. Start imagining how you’ll feel when you’ve achieved your goals. But, realize to get there will be the result of your hard work not by magic. Don’t Get Discouraged by Setbacks. Learn from the experience and keep it moving. Don’t take setbacks personally. There will always be setbacks. It is vital to get over them on your path to reaching your goals. It takes practice to learn to channel those emotions into getting on with it. But you must carry on no matter what. Integrity. Living a principled life, honoring and not compromising your values is an important key because it speaks to who you are at your core. It also helps create the karma surrounding you. Self-Control and Discipline are needed to accomplish just about anything. You’ve got to do the mundane, plug away, and tackle challenges as you head towards your objectives. Relationships with People Who are Doing What You Want. Connect with a like-minded people and harness the power of co-motivation. Help Others Accomplish Their Dreams. Once you get there or are on your way, send the elevator down! Remember the expression, “lifting as you climb”. Few things are as gratifying as helping others.
It seems so long ago that I started my first business. Since that time, I’ve created several successful businesses and learned a lot of lessons along the way. There are several things I wish I would have known in the early days of my entrepreneurial efforts that I hope will help some other first time entrepreneurs on their path to success. 1. You’ll Work Harder for Yourself than You Ever Have for a Boss If you think owning your own business is simple or means you get to lounge around all day long, think again. While this may be an end result after a lot of hard work, it will certainly not be the beginning of your business. You will work long hours, long nights and at times you’ll feel overwhelmed at the amount of effort owning your own business can take. But, also know that owning your own business and working hard for yourself can be one of the most satisfying feelings of your life. 2. Don’t Confuse Setbacks with Failures They say there is no successful business owner who hasn’t failed with at least one business before they started the one that “struck gold”. It is important that you take each failure you encounter on your path to success as an opportunity to learn something. This helps you to not repeat your mistakes and makes you more prepared for your next business venture. In addition, things that seem like failures can turn out to only be minor or temporary roadblocks that can be overcome with time and hard work. Entrepreneurs learn from everything they do, though they may not always “succeed”. 3. You Still Need a Life Many new business owners work all hours of the day and night. While hard work and a lot of hours are certainly required for an entrepreneurial lifestyle, you also need to make time for your personal life – whether it be for family, friends or personal hobbies. You need to take time for your own personal well being. In addition, if you sit behind your computer, in your office or on a “jobsite” all day, every day, you will miss great networking opportunities out in the “social great beyond” of your world. All work and no play makes Jim, or Jane, a very dull person. 4. Good Bookkeeping is Essential This isn’t an understatement. My first time in business, I paid for something here, something there and never kept receipts or records of any expenses. I told myself I would “one day when the business got off the ground”. Eight months later, my business was booming and it was tax time. Not only did I lose out on a lot of business expenses I couldn’t claim due to no proof, I ended up paying an accountant triple what I would have had I not been a nightmare client with no records or receipts. Don’t wait for your business to “take off” – keep records from the very beginning – it will make it a habit, make your taxes owed less painful should the business start booming and will make your accountant more pleasant than mine was. 5. The Internet Isn’t The Magic Pill If you are a new business owner starting your own business based on the Internet, then this part is for you. The Internet is not a “magical flow of endless customers”. The adage “build it and they will come” couldn’t be further from the truth online. You need to work an Internet business as hard as you would a “brick and mortar” establishment. While starting a business online requires less start up and overhead in many cases, it is NOT free. You will need to put out money, or spend a lot of time learning new skills (sometimes both), to make a successful site on the net. It takes marketing, hard work and a willingness to learn. If you think you can slap up a website and people will pile into your shopping cart, then you may want to take some time to actually plan your business model. Good luck with your business. Being an entrepreneur has ups and downs, but it can be the most satisfying and rewarding (both personally, professionally and financially) of your life if you put your heart and soul into doing what it takes to succeed. Audrey Hoffman is a successful entrepreneur who owns several businesses – including http://www.speedy-incorporation.com – a site that offers online incorporation services as well as information about forming an LLC or corporation across the United States. article source: adzines.com
Cash is King… That is what everyone tells us and it is true! You cannot function successfully in any business without proper cash flow. So if this Cash Principle is so well known, then why is it that so many businesses struggle? Sometimes the obvious is not always so obvious when you are entrenched in running the day-to-day aspects of your business. Here are 7 Tips to Improve Your Cash Flow! 1. Cash and Carry. Operate a cash and carry type business versus worrying about receivables. The best business plan is one where customers pay at the time of purchase so you don’t have to worry about invoicing or collection procedures. Invoicing and collections take up valuable time, so you want to come up with creative ways to incentivize payment immediately. Set the ground rules in the beginning so your clients know what you expect. 2. Receivables Collection. Collect your receivables in a prompt manner. Don’t let them hang out there forever until your customers decide they want to pay you. Being a good steward of your business is “good business”, so have a process in place for invoicing and collections. The longer your receivables are outstanding, the less likely you are to collect. You don’t have to be mean and rough to collect promptly from your clients. A good rule of thumb is that you should always have a due date on the invoice and then send out a follow-up statement within 10 to 30 days from the due date. Each industry and business environment has different insights as to what is the “ideal” time. I would not send follow-up correspondence any sooner than 10 days past due. Payment may just be delayed by the mail; however, waiting longer than 30 days is too long. If you have not received payment within 45 to 60 days of the due date, then a phone call should be made to follow-up with your customer. Accounts that go past due 90 or more days should be taken to the next level of collections with an outside agency, internal collection “ninja” or any other mode you have established for collections. Find what works best for your business and stick to it. Each day that you are delayed in receiving payment is an additional cost of doing business. Time is money. 3. Receivables Funding. Implement an accounts receivable funding program. Factoring of accounts receivable has become very popular and it can be a great way of keeping the cash flowing. Businesses who deal with large businesses or government agencies lend themselves to utilizing factoring programs. If your clientele is made up of small businesses or individuals, you may find it more difficult to establish an accounts receivable funding program. Why? Funding companies are monitoring risk. There is less risk with larger companies or government agencies. Or so they think! 4. Vendors. Negotiate terms with your vendors to help delay the outflow of cash payments. Lots of vendors have payment terms where you can delay the payment until end of the month or maybe even up to 60 days. This allows you a little float time to use their money while you are working on your project. Then hopefully you’ll receive payment from your customers prior to needing to pay for the products you purchased. Some companies also go the route of consignment. Then you are selling someone else’s goods and don’t have your money wrapped up in inventory. This option can help you increase your product offerings without having to invest large amounts of money in inventory. 5. Customer Deposits. Have your customers pay a deposit prior to the start of the job. This will help you cover your upfront costs as you start the projects. It’s very common to have a deposit with the signing of your contract. It decreases the risk associated with nonpayment because you’ve received a portion up front. You can also implement periodic payments throughout the contract vs. a single payment upon completion of the project so that cash is flowing in consistently. 6. Revolving Credit Line. Establish a revolving line of credit through a lender to help you with potential cash flow crunches. Especially if the amount of savings from prompt pay discounts are greater than the financing charge from the lender or the lender’s financing charge is less than what your vendors might charge for late payments. This helps give your business a safety net so that you can continue to operate during those times when you are offered great specials if you buy today but may not have extra cash available. 7. Savings Fund. Establish a savings fund to help you operate through slow times. Most businesses have swings in their business flow and managing cash effectively can be a challenge. Store away extra during the good times to help alleviate issues during the slow season. I know this sounds easier than it is, but if you take out a percentage each month and transfer it to a savings account then it will be “out of sight and out of mind.” You may find that each of these 7 tips is viable for your business, or maybe only 1 or 2. Anything that you can do to focus on better cash flow will provide benefits to your business. The worst thing you can do is sit back and “hope” that things go well. Look around! See those “CLOSED” signs on the surrounding shop windows? They played the “hope” game and lost. What are you going to do? Hope? No?implement a plan for cash flow management starting now. Copyright 2005 Pam Newman Pam Newman helps business owners keep money from slipping through their fingers. Pam is a Certified Management Accountant, Certified QuickBooks ProAdvisor, and Author of Out of the Red and Unlocking the Secrets of QuickBooks. Pam believes that it is important for you to understand the financial picture of your business, so that you can make informed decisions. For more information, please visit http://www.rppc.net article source: adzines.com
Everyone wants to succeed in life. Most people want to succeed in business. And no one starts a business of any sort wanting to fail. Yet the sad fact is that 80% of businesses will fail in the first 3 years of operation. So what can you do to ensure your success? Luckily these five simple (never confuse simple with easy), tried and tested steps dramatically increase your chances. 1. Vision It might seem like management techno-speak or newage psycho-babble but all the evidence is that developing and articulating a vision for your business and life is a major key to success. Take time out. Really think about what you want from your business and life. Write it down. A vision statement should not be long – it doesn’t even have to be in words. If you think graphically then capturing your vision in a picture or diagram could be just what you need. You are striving for a short, to the point description of where you want to be in 1, 2 and 5 years time. In addition to your financial vision you need to ask yourself some questions:
  • What will our major products and services be?
  • What will be our target market?
  • Will we be market leaders, followers or niche players?
  • What will our unique competitive position be?
  • How will we ‘know’ our ideal customer?
  • How will we be perceived by our customers?
  • How will we promote your services to our customers?
An old Japanese Proverb says, “If you aim at a tree and fall short, you may only hit the ground. If you aim at the sky you may hit a tree.” Make sure you don’t set your targets too low. Just before leaving the subject of ‘Vision’ – the number one key to achieving your vision is to communicate it widely. Make sure you tell your family and friends. Make it a central pillar in corporate literature. Include it in job descriptions. The more you communicate your vision the more you demonstrate your commitment and the more likely you are to succeed. 2. Set Out Your Goals Success means something different to us all. A self-made businessman worth millions of dollars would be thought successful by most. But if that businessman only rarely sees his family, never gets to play golf and spends all of his time on airplanes or in some exotic sounding (but usually antiseptic) hotel, is that really a success? Would that businessman think his life a success? Possibly, possibly not. But if that man had set himself goals for his business, private and social lives he at least has some way of measuring his achievements. Your vision is all about ‘what’ you are going to achieve. Goals are about the stepping stones to achieving that vision. Before starting on any endeavour – set your goals. Make sure your goals are specific enough that you know when you have achieved them. “I want to make lots of money” is weak. “I am going to make $100,000 next year and $200,000 the year after” is much stronger. The more specific and well articulated your goals the greater your chance of achieving them. Don’t forget to include your private and social goals. Many rich people complain that they have all the freedom that money can buy – but money can’t buy the time to enjoy what they have earned. An old boss of mine from my days in corporate consultancy once observed, “You can’t buy back the years of your children’s lives”. He’s right. Make sure you know what real success would mean to you. 3. Plan, Plan, Plan If the number one key to success in retailing is location, location and location, the number one key to success in business is plan, plan, plan. Remember the 5 Ps success model – Prior Planning Prevents Poor Performance. (When I was taught this in the military there was a 6th P – for the sake of a mixed audience I have left this out. Use your imagination – you’ll guess what it was :-)) If you’ve done your goal setting you know what you are going to achieve. The point of planning is how you are going to do it. Break each goal down into constituent steps needed for its achievement. For each step decide what, who, where and when it is to be done. Be realistic and make sure that every step is achievable in the time set. Be prepared – when you plan-out all that you need to do, the amount of work can be daunting. Better to know this up-front than sale merrily into a venture only to find it is a huge monster that is going to take you a lifetime to kill. 4. Action Counts I’ve seen some beautiful plans. Highly researched, well thought out and presented. I’ll talk to a business owner and they’ll say, “We’ve got a plan” and pull it out of the bottom draw of a filing cabinet somewhere. “So, why aren’t you using it”, I’ll ask. Nine times out of 10 the plan was produced to obtain funding. Lot’s of really good work is done but once the money is obtained the plan is put to one side and ignored. Big mistake. Taking action is the only thing that counts. Every successfull business I have looked at has clear, current business, operational and marketing plans. It doesn’t matter whether your business is offline or online. It’s taking action that delivers the results. 5. Another 5 ‘P’s to Success Passion – You have to believe in what you are doing. No where is this more obvious than on the internet. You can spot the ‘me-too’ advertisers in a second. The people who succeed are the ones in have passion, who truly believe in what they are doing. Do something that you love. Push – No matter how good your plan you have to provide a big push to get it moving. Your plan inevitably involves change. Achieving change takes effort. Think of it as if you were trying to move a boulder. To get that boulder up and moving takes a lot of muscle and effort. Once it is moving though it becomes much easier. Persistence – Getting started is relatively easy. Afterall, you are all fired up with energy and enthusiasm at that time. Few things worth achieving happen over night. Instead, there will be problems, hold-ups and frustrations. Don’t allow yourself to become disillusioned or demotivated. You need persistence. Patience – Results don’t happen instantly. Allied to persistence you will need some patience. Profit – OK, OK it’s trite. But follow the steps here, gear yourself to provide these 5 Ps and you will succeed. In business, profit is a measure of your success. No one can guarantee your success whether in life or in business. But you can dramatically increase your chances of success through these five simple, very well established principles. The question is, “WILL YOU”? Keith Longmire is the owner of JKL Breakthrough Growth Solutions. His site is designed to provide tested, proven marketing and growth solutions guaranteed to make just about any business achieve rapid, sustainable growth. article source: adzines.com
[html ]As a franchise sales consultant and Business Broker one of the most frequent questions I receive from individuals who are considering becoming a business owner is why should I buy a franchise versus starting a new business from scratch. My answer is that franchising can generally offer a number of distinct advantages to individuals who want to start and run their own business including the minimization of risk, comprehensive training & support, marketing assistance, a proven business model, and more. Overall the advantages of buying a franchise can generally offer an individual a greater chance of becoming a successful small business owner.
Minimize Risk:
In my opinion the biggest advantage of buying a franchise business is that it is generally a lot less risky than starting a new business. Most studies conclude that over 90% of new businesses fail within 3 to 5 years. In comparison, U.S. Dept of Commerce studies have shown that over 92% of franchised businesses are still operating after 5 years. With an established and proven operating system already in place for to follow, franchises can generally offer you a much greater chance of establishing a successful business.
Training Provided:
When you buy a franchise most franchisers will automatically require you to complete a comprehensive training program that can last any where from 1 to 4 weeks or more. This training is typically held at the franchisers corporate headquarters or at the actual franchise location. You will benefit greatly by being trained to operate your franchise location the same way that all other franchisees were, dramatically reducing the learning curve by directly transferring the knowledge and secrets of running a successful operation.
Franchisor Support:
Providing on going support to new and established franchisees is second nature to most franchise companies. Its just common sense that franchisers will want to support you because it is in their best interests for you to succeed for a number of obvious reasons including the chance to generate more royalty fees and expanding their franchising system. So in general you can always feel comfortable that most franchisers will be available to provide support and answer any questions and concerns you may have about your franchise business.
Marketing Assistance:
One of the major advantages of the franchising business model and the system of multiple standardized units that it creates (that generally offer the same products and customer experience) is that it inherently helps market your franchise location with little or no effort. That is not to say that as a franchisee you should not attempt to do some of your own marketing as well. And if you do, the good news is that many franchisers are often willing and can be very effective in helping you develop marketing plans for your own local market.
A Proven Business Model:
Starting a new business from scratch is inherently risky. When you buy a franchise you are generally buying a proven business model or concept that can be independently validated as having a track record of success. Unlike most small businesses started from scratch, a franchise business can offer the advantages of established operating systems, services, products, marketing, and brand name recognition that can save you invaluable time and money. And most importantly, these advantages can ultimately increase your chance of becoming a successful small business owner.
About Author:
Ray Haiber has 10 years experience as a professional small Arizona business sales broker and franchise consultant. Go here to view, research, and buy franchises for sale throughout the USA article source: adzines.com[/html]
Every aspiring business owner should have a business plan to focus the direction, outline operations, and help secure investors. A business plan is a blueprint of every facet of your business. Sales, Marketing, Advertising, Promotion and Location are some of the elements aspects of creating a plan. If you’re seeking outside funding for your business, a business plan will be required. Even if you have your own resources to fund your business, a basic business plan can improve the chances that your business will succeed. They also provide a map for growing your business. Here are some key elements of a strong business plan: 
  1. Cover page-short identification and description of your business.
  2. Table of contents-allows readers to reference a specific section.
  3. Executive summary-overview of your total plan, outlining the steps you will take for success.
  4. Business background-highlights your skills and experience in the field.
  5. Marketing plan-details the products and services you’re offering, your market, pricing strategy, and plans for marketing and advertising your business.
  6. Action plan-details the specific action-items you will utilize to create and deliver your products and services.
  7. Financial management, statements, and projections-source of start-up capital, monthly budgets, projected expenditures, expected return on investment, projected balance sheets, accounting strategy, and more.
  8. Operations-hiring procedures, insurance, leasing, equipment and other expected operational costs.
  9. Closing statement-confirmation of goals and objectives for a successful business.
  10. Appendix- statistical analyses, sample marketing materials, and resumes.
ACCION USA  www.accionusa.org Accion USA is a private non-profit organization that offers small business loans of up to $50,000 and financial literacy education to small business owners in the United States. The online lending platform gives entrepreneurs the ability to apply for a loan from anywhere in the United States. Loan Inquiries Phone: 866- 245-0783 Email: info@accionusa.org General Inquiries ACCION USA 115 East 23rd Street, 7th Floor New York, NY 10010 Phone: (212) 387-0377 Fax: (212) 387-0277 ALL BUSINESS www.allbusiness.com AllBusiness.com is one of the top online resources helping business owners with the valuable, practical and wide ranging formation they need. The site offers resources including how-to articles, business forms, contracts and agreements, expert advice, blogs, business news, business directory listings, product comparisons, business guides, a business association and more. BUSINESS.GOV www.business.gov  Business.gov is the U.S. Government’s official website offering small businesses access to Federal, state and local resources from a single website with information on government programs, forms, contacts, and guidance with laws and regulations. Business.gov makes it easier for small business owners to get the information they need to successfully start and operate their ventures. MICROLOAN PROGRAM www.sba.gov/services/financialassistance/sbaloantopics/microloans/index.html  The Microloan Program provides very small loans to start-up, newly established, or growing small business concerns. Under this program, SBA makes funds available to nonprofit community based lenders (intermediaries) which, in turn, make loans to eligible borrowers in amounts up to a maximum of $35,000. The average loan size is about $13,000. Applications are submitted to the local intermediary and all credit decisions are made on the local level. MY OWN BUSINESS www.myownbusiness.org My Own Business is a nonprofit organization committed to helping people succeed in business. My Own Business provides a free online course geared toward the new or aspiring business owner or the established business owner looking to grow and expand their existing business. Over12 million visitors have made use of this information. The course is presented by successful business owners who point out the common, avoidable mistakes. SMALL BUSINESS ASSOCIATION www.sba.gov Phone: 1-800-U-ASK-SBA (1-800-827-5722) Email: answerdesk@sba.gov The U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) is an independent agency of the federal government to aid, counsel, assist and protect the interests of small business concerns, to preserve free competitive enterprise and to maintain and strengthen the overall economy of our nation. The SBA helps Americans start, build and grow businesses through an extensive network of field offices and partnerships with public and private organizations.
  1. Research – Find out all you need to know about the type of business you’re getting into. Get necessary training, research online, ask around to make sure you are as well informed as possible about all sectors of the business.
  2. Know Your Market – Consumers are an essential part of any successful business. Make sure you know your target market well. Find out how your product or services can best meet their needs.
  3. Business Plan – If you are seeking investors in your business, a business plan will be required.
  4. Make it Legit – contact Small Business Administration (sba.gov) to find out how to get a business license. Get incorporated starting at $139, plus state fees at Legalzoom.com
  5. Register the name of your business (“Doing Business As” – D.B.A.) with the state government.
  6. Finance Your Business – Find government backed loans, venture capital and research grants to get started.
  7. Get a Tax ID Number – Find out which tax identification number you’ll need to obtain from the IRS and your state revenue agency.
  8. Register for state and local taxes – Register with your state to obtain a tax identification number, workers’ compensation, unemployment and disability insurance.
  9. Get Business Licenses and Permits – Get a list of federal, state and local licenses and permits required for your business.
  10. Get Help – contact International Virtual Assistants Association (ivaa.org) for administrative assistance. For $20, get 250 business cards at Vistaprint.com. Register your website at Godaddy.com. You can hire CuteVamp.com to get website in within 24 hours in just $100.
There is perhaps no more important decision than to take charge of your own financial future. We live in a world of opportunity, and yet most Americans are buried in credit card and other debt. We are surrounded by people who are getting rich, but most of us are running in place. If you can read this, you are literate, have a computer, you are part of the “wired generation”. You can become as financially independent as you wish to be. Here are the Top 10 keys to your financial success: 1. Decide to be financially successful. This is different than wishing, hoping, wanting or even desiring to be rich. Make a commitment that this is going to happen! Financial independence is not an accident or matter of luck, and it usually requires some inconvenience. Have you decided to achieve this goal? 2. Understand how money works. Most of never studied finance or investing in school. Most of were never even taught to balance a checkbook! To master anything, you have to understand it. Read. Study what successful people do. Take classes. 3. Master your relationship with money. Some of us spend for excitement, to show off, to prove we can. Some of us are addicted to spending, and some of us are just careless about it. Whatever your relationship with money, understand it and develop a relationship of respect, appreciation and gratitude. Use your money, rather than allowing it to run your life. 4. Set specific goals. They should be challenging, but not unbelievable, just out of reach but not out of sight. Challenge yourself to be out of debt by a specific date. Make a commitment to saving an exact amount each month. 5. Develop a budget. A budget is a set of dreams and aspirations. It’s how you really, really want to use money to benefit your family and run your life. Budget to buy the things you really want, and to eliminate the “impulses”, the toys that waste too much of our income. A budget is a map to your destination. Have one and use it! 6. Reduce spending. Yes, this comes after making a budget, because when you begin getting control of your money (rather than the other way around) you have powerful new reasons to reduce expenses. Most self-made millionaires live far below their means! You should to. 7. Begin investing. Most of us spend or speculate. Both are roads to disaster! Invest in things you understand. Invest cautiously, wisely, and regularly. The objective is not to “make a killing”, but to get rich over time. Know and obey the distinction between gambling, and putting your money to work for you. 8. Increase assets. Most people try to increase their income, and that’s a mistake. Making more money means paying more taxes. It takes time and hard work. And, when wealth arrives in the form of cash, it’s easier to spend. Millionaires buy stocks and buildings, they invest in assets that will make them rich – and that are hard to spend on a whim! 9. Reduce taxes. Most Americans pay more in taxes than for food, clothing and shelter combined! It is your largest expense! The poor and middle class don’t realize how much they pay because it’s deducted from their pay check. The wealthy know there are legal and appropriate ways to shelter income, to invest in socially-responsible ways, and that the tax code encourages this. Learn the tax laws and use them for your benefit! (Yes, it’s the most boring reading you’ll ever do, and worth it!) 10. Use your wealth wisely. Someone once said, “The reason most of us aren’t rich is that we’d spend it all on ourselves.” Give. Share. Help others. When you use money to make a difference, to have a positive impact, you get the chance to do more. Being greedy and selfish will not draw money to you. Investing in your community, will! To begin your education about money and becoming a millionaire, I highly recommend several books on the subject. Two of the best are: “The Millionaire Next Door” by Thomas Stanley and William Danko, and “Rich Dad, Poor Dad” by Robert Kiyosaki and Sharon Lechter. By Philip E. Humbert. All Rights Reserved. This article may be copied and used in your own newsletter or on your website as long as you include the following information: “Written by Dr. Philip E. Humbert, writer, speaker and success coach. Dr. Humbert has over 300 free articles, tools and resources for your success, including a great newsletter! It’s all on his website at: http://www.philiphumbert.com article source: adzines.com
Key 1 – Pay your self first key 2 – Saving is not a punishment. Its making choices about how you’ll use your money. Key 3 – Financial sucess involves hard choices. Be prepared to make them. Key 4 – Make a budget and stick to it. Key 5 – Future financial independence is worth present sacrifices. Key 6 – If you cant afford it pay cash, pass. Key 7 – Communicate with your creditors, especially if you are going to be late with a payment. Key 8 – As soon as expenses rise to the level of your income, trouble is not far behind. Key 9 – Self-discipline is the key to any sucessful financial program. Key 10 – Balancing your checkbook with each statement is essential. It costs only 15 minutes a month and is one of the best investments you can make. Key 11 – If you dont know where your money is going, you cant decide where to spend it. Key 12 – A penny saved is a penny earned. Key 13 – You never know whats going to happen. Tuck away an emergency fund of at least 3 months. Key 14 – Save at least 10 percent of each paycheck. Key 15 – Beware of small expenses. Each muffin and cup of coffee on the way to work adds up over a years times. Key 16 – make a list your basic, essential living costs and add them up to get a real picture of what you need to cover your monthly nut. Key 17 – Avoid the temptation of buying more than you need just because its a good price. You cant afford the savings. Key 18 – If you have multiple crdit cards, pay down your highest intersts cards first. Key 19 – Paying at least double the minimum required each month will show progress. Key 20 – Re-evaluate your personal budget at the begining of every year and adjust where needed. Key 21 – Teach your children how to save. Mike Magana is a personal finance coach that helps families in reducing their taxes, getting out of debt, and controlling there living expenses. Please reach me at personalfinancecoach@yahoo.com for any comments. article source: adzines.com
Acceleration Clause – A stipulation in a loan contract stating that the entire balance becomes due immediately if other contract conditions are not met. Accrued Interest – Interest that has been earned but not received or recorded. Amortization – Liquidation of a debt by making periodic payments over a set period, at the end of which the balance is zero. Annuity – A series of equal payments made at regular intervals, with interest compounded at a specified rate. Appreciation – An increase in the value or price. Asset – Anything an individual or business owns that has commercial or exchange value. Auto Debit – The deduction from a checking or savings account of funds that are automatically transferred to a creditor each month. Some lenders offer interest rate discounts if loan payments are set up on auto debit at the beginning of the loan. Balance – The amount owed on a loan or credit card or the amount in a savings or investment account. Balance Sheet – A financial statement showing a “snapshot” of the assets, liabilities and net worth of an individual or organization on a given date. Bankruptcy – A legal proceeding declaring that an individual is unable to pay debts. Chapters 7 and 13 of the federal bankruptcy code govern personal bankruptcy. Beneficiary – The person designated to receive the proceeds of a life insurance policy. Budget – An itemized summary of probable income and expenses for a given period. Capital – Cash or other resources accumulated and available for use in producing wealth. Cash Flow – Money coming to an individual or business less money being paid out during a given period. Certificate of Deposit (CD) – A type of savings account that earns a fixed interest rate over a specified period of time. Collateral – Assets pledged to secure a loan. Common Stock – A kind of ownership in a corporation that entitles the investor to share any profits remaining after all other obligations have been met. Compound Interest – Interest computed on the sum of the original principal and accrued interest. Credit – The granting of money or something else of value in exchange for a promise of future repayment. Credit Card – A plastic card from a financial services company that allows cardholders to buy goods and services on credit. Credit Report – A loan and bill payment history, kept by a credit reporting company and used by financial institutions and other potential creditors to determine the likelihood a future debt will be repaid. Credit Reporting Company – An organization that compiles credit information on individuals and businesses and makes it available for a fee. Credit Score – A number generated by a statistical model that objectively predicts the likelihood that a debt will be repaid on time. Credit Union – A cooperative organization that provides financial services to its members. Creditor – A person, financial institution or other business that lends money. Debit – Charges to an account. Debit Card – A plastic card similar to a credit card that allows money to be withdrawn or the cost of purchases paid directly from the holder’s bank account. Debt – Money owed; also known as a liability. Debt Service – Periodic payment of the principal and interest on a loan. Deductible – The amount of loss paid by an insurance policyholder. The deductible may be expressed as a specified dollar amount or a percent of the claim amount. Delinquency – The failure to make timely payments under a loan or other credit agreement. Direct Deposit – The electronic transfer of a payment from a company to an individual’s checking or savings account. Many employers offer direct deposit of paychecks. Diversification – The distribution of investments among several companies to lessen the risk of loss. Dividend – A share of profits paid to a stockholder. Equity Ownership – interest in an asset after liabilities are deducted. Face Value – The principal amount of a bond, which will be paid off at maturity. Fair Market Value – The price a willing buyer will pay and a willing seller will accept for real or personal property. Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. (FDIC) – A federally chartered corporation that insures bank deposits up to $100,000. Finance Company – A company that makes loans to individuals. Financing Fee – The fee a lender charges to originate a loan. The fee is based on a percentage of the loan amount; one point is equivalent to 1 percent. Flexible Spending Account – An employer-sponsored account that allows employees to save pretax dollars to cover qualified medical or dependent care expenses. Foreclosure – The legal process used to force the payment of debt secured by collateral whereby the property is sold to satisfy the debt. 401(k) Plan – A tax-deferred investment and savings plan that serves as a personal retirement fund for employees. Health Savings Account – A tax-advantaged personal savings account, set up to be used exclusively for medical expenses; must be paired with a high deductible health insurance policy. High-Deductible Health Plan – A health insurance policy that requires the policyholder to pay more out-of-pocket medical expenses but usually has lower premiums than traditional health insurance plans. Individual Development Account (IDA) – A type of savings account, offered in some communities, for people whose income is below a certain level. Individual Retirement Account (IRA) – A retirement plan, offered by banks, brokerage firms, mutual funds and insurance companies, to which individuals can contribute each year on a tax-deferred basis. Inflation – A sustained increase in the prices of goods and services. Installment Plan – A plan requiring a borrower to make payments at specified intervals over the life of a loan. Insurance Premium – The amount of money required for coverage under a specific insurance policy for a given period of time. Depending on the policy agreement, the premium may be paid monthly, quarterly, semiannually or annually. Interest – A fee for the use of money over time. It is an expense to the borrower and revenue to the lender. Also, money earned on a savings account. Interest Rate – The percentage charged for a loan, usually a percentage of the amount lent. Also, the percentage paid on a savings account. Investing – The act of using money to make more money. Investor – An organization, corporation, individual or other entity that acquires an ownership position in an investment, assuming risk of loss in exchange for anticipated returns. Leverage – The ability to use a small amount of money to attract other funds, including loans, grants and equity investments. Liability – Money an individual or organization owes; same as debt. Also, a kind of insurance for the policyholder’s legal obligation to pay for either bodily injury or property damage caused to another party. Lien – A creditor’s claim against a property, which may entitle the creditor to seize the property if a debt is not repaid. Liquidity – The ease with which an investment can be converted into cash. Load – The fee a brokerage firm charges an investor for handling transactions. Loan – A sum of money lent at interest. Management Fee – The fee paid to a company for managing an investment portfolio. Market Value – The amount a seller can expect to receive on the open market for merchandise, services or securities. Maturity – The time when a note, bond or other investment option comes due for payment to investors. Money Market Account – A type of savings account offered by a financial institution. Mortgage – A temporary and conditional pledge of property to a creditor as security for the repayment of a debt. Municipal Bond – A bond issued by cities, counties, states and local governmental agencies to finance public projects, such as construction of bridges,schools and highways. Mutual Fund – A pool of money managed by an investment company. Net Worth – The difference between the total assets and total liabilities of an individual. Par Value – The nominal, or face, value of a stock or bond, expressed as a specific amount on the security. Predatory Lending – Targeting loans to seniors, low-income and other people to take advantage of their financial status or lack of financial knowledge. Pretax – A person’s salary before state and federal income taxes are calculated. Prime Rate – The lowest interest rate on bank loans, offered to preferred borrowers. Principal – The unpaid balance on a loan, not including interest; the amount of money invested. Promissory Note – A written promise on a financial instrument to repay the money plus interest. Qualified Plan – A tax-deferred retirement plan for the self-employed. Return – The profit made on an investment. Revenue Bond – A type of municipal bond backed by revenue from the project the bond finances. Risk – The possibility of loss on an investment. Savings Account – A service depository institutions offer whereby people can deposit their money for future use and earn interest. Stock Option – The right to buy or sell a corporation’s stock at a predetermined price or calculable formula; sometimes used as part of employee compensation. Stockholder – A person who owns stock in a company and is eligible to share in profits and losses; same as shareholder. Tax-deferred – Phrase referring to money that is not subject to income tax until it is withdrawn from an account,such as an individual retirement account or a 401(k) account. Term – The period from when a loan is made until it is fully repaid. Terms – Provisions specified in a loan agreement. Treasury Bill – A short-term investment issued by the U.S. government for a year or less. Treasury Bond – A government security with a term of more than 10 years; interest is paid semiannually. Treasury Inflation-Protected Security (TIPS) – A Treasury bond or note that is tied to inflation so that the principal amount of the investment increases or decreases according to the annual inflation rate. Treasury Note – A government security with a maturity that can range from two to 10 years; interest is paid every six months. U.S. Savings Bond – A nontransferable, registered bond issued by the U.S. government in denominations of $50 to $10,000.
Myth and fact: What you need to know about credit scores (ARA) – For all of the discussion around the importance of credit scores, it’s hard to know what’s true, what’s fiction, and what lies in between. While there are misperceptions and misunderstandings still lingering in the marketplace, the good news is that overall knowledge about credit scoring is improving. A recent survey by the Consumer Federation of America (CFA) and VantageScore Solutions, one of the two primary companies that generate credit scores, shows that consumers know they have more than one credit score, have a better understanding about the factors that affect credit scores, and have increased familiarity with how different kinds of companies and entities use credit scores. Consumers also have a good handle on some recent additions to federal laws regarding when lenders are required to inform borrowers about their credit scores. “Increases in consumer knowledge probably reflect, in part, the increased public attention given to credit scores because of the new protections,” says Stephen Brobeck, executive director, CFA. “The improvements may also be related to increased efforts of financial educators, including our own educational website, creditscorequiz.org, to inform consumers about credit reports and scores.” However, despite the positive developments, there’s room for improvement according to the CFA-VantageScore Solutions survey. Myth: Low credit scores don’t greatly affect how much you pay over the life of the loan. Fact: Low scores can be costly. Only 29 percent of survey respondents were aware that on a $20,000, 60-month auto loan, a borrower with a low credit score is likely to pay at least $5,000 more than a borrower with a high credit score. Myth: Age and marital status are factors used in calculating credit scores. Fact: Over 50 percent of survey respondents incorrectly believed their age and marital status were factors used to calculate their credit scores. The only factors credit score models use are related to your use of credit, especially whether you make payments on time. Myth: Multiple inquiries when applying for a consumer or mortgage loan will have a negative effect on your score. Fact: If multiple inquiries occur during a one-to two-week window, generally they will not lower your credit scores. Only 9 percent of respondents were aware of this, and 34 percent incorrectly believed that each inquiry will lower your score. Understanding credit scoring can be complex, but it’s in your best interest to get the facts straight. With a clear view of what’s true and false, it’s easier to set the course for a sound financial future. For more information about the myths and facts of credit, visit www.creditscorequiz.orgwww.vantagescore.com  and www.consumerfed.org. These websites are free, do not display any advertising and do not collect any personal data. Both the online quiz and a corresponding brochure are also available in Spanish at www.creditscorequiz.org/Espanol.
PROPERTY INSURANCE Auto Insurance State law requires that all motor vehicles have liability insurance to cover injury to other people or damage to their property. If you have a loan on your vehicle, your lender will also require physical damage coverage on it. You may select a higher deductible (the amount you pay out of pocket before insurance kicks in) and receive a more affordable rate on the premium (the cost of the policy). If you have your emergency savings in place, you will feel more confident about taking out a higher-deductible policy, which will lower your premium costs. Home Insurance Homeowners insurance covers your home and possessions. The personal liability coverage in a homeowner’s policy protects you from loss resulting from any injuries that may occur on your property. Your mortgage lender will require you to carry a certain amount of insurance coverage as long as the mortgage is in place. You may also consider a higher-deductible insurance plan to save money on your homeowner’s coverage. Standard homeowner’s coverage insures your home and its contents against loss from such risks as fire and theft. You may require special insurance for flood, earthquake or other risks specific to your area. Contact your state department of insurance for more information on insurance in high-risk areas. Another type of household protection, a home warranty, is a service contract that protects the homeowner from unexpected costs for repair or replacement of major systems. These might include heating and air-conditioning, plumbing, electrical systems or a water heater. Sellers will sometimes provide a one-year home warranty to give potential buyers added confidence. The homebuyer then has the option of renewing the warranty at the end of the year. If you are renting your home or apartment, you should purchase renters or contents insurance to cover your possessions against loss from fire or theft. Your landlord’s insurance will only cover damage to the building, not its contents. Also, if someone is hurt in your rented home, that liability is yours, not the landlord’s. Medical Insurance Medical insurance pays for some, but not all, of your doctor, hospital and prescription drug costs. Many people have significant levels of debt because they didn’t have medical insurance or they didn’t have savings to pay the expenses that weren’t covered by their health plan. Late payments and defaults on medical debt may be reported on credit reports and affect a person’s credit score. Premiums are lower on employer-provided health insurance because risk is spread over a larger group of people. Take advantage of the lower costs that employer-sponsored health plans offer, but expect to pay part of the premium out of your paycheck. In addition to medical insurance, many employers offer dental and vision plans, often at low cost. Flexible spending accounts People who are insured through their employer should consider participating in a flexible spending account (FSA) if it is offered. An employer-sponsored FSA allows employees to save pretax dollars in an account to cover deductibles, co-pays, prescription and over-the-counter drugs, and other health expenses not covered by insurance. Employees need to plan their FSA spending so they have enough saved to cover their uninsured medical expenses but not more than they can use in one year plus two and a half months. On March 15 every year, money left in an FSA from the previous year is forfeited. If you have health insurance and your employer doesn’t offer a flexible spending account, you should make sure your emergency savings account is adequate to provide a safety net against unexpected medical costs. HEALTH Health savings accounts. If you do not have health insurance or you need more affordable insurance, a high-deductible health plan (HDHP), coupled with a health savings account (HSA), provides medical insurance coverage and a tax-free opportunity to save for future medical needs. The premium for an HDHP is generally lower than for traditional health insurance because the deductible (the amount you pay before the insurance kicks in) is higher. That’s where the health savings account comes in. HSAs are set up at banks or other financial institutions to pay for current and future health-related costs that occur before the deductible is met and insurance takes over. Contributions to an HSA are tax-deductible, up to certain limits, even if you do not itemize deductions on your income tax return. Interest earned on the HSA account is not taxable, and withdrawals are tax-free if used for qualified medical expenses. An HSA is portable, so it stays with you even if you change jobs or retire. Plus, unspent savings in an HSA can grow year-to-year. For more information about HSAs, go to http://www.treasury.gov/offices/+public-affairs/hsa. Health insurance for children. Every state provides free or low-cost health insurance for children in low- to moderate-income households. For more information about state programs, contact the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services at 877-Kids Now (877- 543-7669) or go to www.insurekidsnow.gov. Disability Insurance Statistics show that you have a higher risk of becoming disabled than of dying before age 65. Disability insurance helps you pay living expenses if you are sick or injured and unable to work for a long time. Your employer may offer this insurance in its benefits plan. It is a good idea to buy this protection even if you have to pay for part of the premium. LIFE INSURANCE The need for life insurance depends on a person’s circumstances. In the event of your death, life insurance pays money to the person you choose (your beneficiary). Life insurance helps give financial protection to your children, spouse, parents or even your business. While some types of life insurance offer savings and investment components to keep the future cost of premiums lower or to increase the death benefit, they are not a substitute for a savings or investment plan. Low-cost term insurance, often available through your employer, can offer protection for young families. Personal accident insurance may also offer a cushion to families if a member dies or is seriously injured in an accident. This kind of insurance is often available through your employer or other provider at relatively low cost. If you or a family member became very ill and needed a nursing home, who would pay for it? You would, until all your assets, and those of your spouse, are exhausted. Only then would government assistance help cover these needs. Long-term care insurance is not medical insurance, but it pays for such health-related items as nursing home, assisted living or in-home care. Generally, the need for long-term care comes late in life, but insurance premiums are much less expensive when you are younger. Some employers offer access to long-term care insurance for employees to purchase, but most consumers have to find coverage themselves. Shopping for long-term care insurance takes research, common sense and attention to the policy’s details. Tips for Protecting Your Wealth There are many types of property, health and life insurance, so do your research and seek good advice.
  • Take advantage of group insurance through your employer or other associations you may have.
  • Study the needs of your family and decide how much you can afford to pay.
  • Shop around and get at least two quotes.
  • Consider a higher deductible to lower your premium.
  • Ask about other discounts that may be available (for a good driving record, safety equipment, multiple policies with the same provider, etc.) to reduce your cost of coverage.
  • Review your insurance coverage annually to make sure you have appropriate coverage as your situation changes.
  • Like all investments, be sure to get all the facts before parting with your hard-earned money.
INSURANCE LONG-TERM CARE INSURANCE Buy Insurance Wisely Insure U, a web site sponsored by the National Association of Insurance Commissioners representing insurance regulators from across the United States, has more information on buying all types of insurance at www.insureuonline.org. SOURCE: U.S. Financial Literacy & Education Commission
Remember the definition of net worth (wealth)? Assets – Liabilities = Net Worth Liabilities are your debts. Debt reduces net worth. Plus, the interest you pay on debt, including credit card debt, is money that cannot be saved or invested—it’s just gone. Debt is a tool to be used wisely for such things as buying a house. If not used wisely, debt can easily get out of hand. For example, putting day-to-day expenses—like groceries or utility bills—on a credit card and not paying off the balance monthly can lead to debt overload. Why people get into trouble with debt Lots of people are mired in debt. In some cases, they could not control the causes of their debt. However, in some instances they could have. Many people get into serious debt because they:
  • Experienced financial stresses caused by unemployment, medical bills or divorce.
  • Could not control spending, did not plan for the future and did not save money.
  • Lacked knowledge of financial and credit matters.
Tips for Controlling Debt
  • Develop a budget and stick to it.
  • Save money so you’re prepared for unforeseen circumstances. You should have at least three to six months of living expenses stashed in your rainy day savings account, because as the poet Longfellow put it, “Into each life some rain must fall.”
  • When faced with a choice of financing a purchase, it may be a better financial decision to choose a less expensive model of the same product and save or invest the difference.
  • Pay off credit card balances monthly.
  • If you must borrow, learn everything about the loan, including interest rate, fees and penalties for late payments or early repayment
Speaking of interest When you take out a loan, you repay the principal, which is the amount borrowed, plus interest, the amount charged for lending you the money. The interest on your monthly balance is a good example of compound interest that you pay. The interest is added to your bill, and the next month interest is charged on that amount and on the outstanding balance. The bottom line on interest is that those who know about interest earn it; those who don’t, pay it. Avoid credit card debt Planners rarely use credit cards. When they do, they pay off their balances every month. When a credit card balance is not paid off monthly, it means paying interest—often 20 percent or more a year—on everything purchased. So think of credit card debt as a high-interest loan. Do you need to reduce your credit card debt? Here are some suggestions.
  • Pay cash.
  • Set a monthly limit on charging, and keep a written record so you don’t exceed that amount.
  • Limit the number of credit cards you have. Cut up all but one of your cards. Stash that one out of sight, and use it only in emergencies.
  • Choose the card with the lowest interest rate and no (or very low) annual fee. But beware of low introductory interest rates offered by mail. These rates often skyrocket after the first few months.
  • Don’t apply for credit cards to get a free gift or a discount on a purchase.
  • Steer clear of blank checks that financial services companies send you. These checks are cash advances that may carry a higher interest rate than typical charges.
  • Pay bills on time to avoid late charges or increased interest rates.
Know what creditors say about you Those who have used credit will have a credit report that shows everything about their payment history, including late payments. The information in your credit report is used to create your credit score. A credit score is a number generated by a statistical model that objectively predicts the likelihood that you will repay on time. Banks, insurance companies, potential landlords and other lenders use credit scores. Credit scores range from under 500 to 800 and above and are determined by payment history, the amount of outstanding debt, length of your credit history, recent inquiries on your credit report and the types of credit in use. Factors not considered in a credit score include age, race or ethnicity, income, job, marital status, education, length of time at your current address, and whether you own or rent your home. What’s on YOUR Credit Report? Consumers have the right to receive annually a free copy of their credit report from each of the three major credit reporting companies: Equifax: 1-800-685-1111; www.equifax.com Experian: 1-800-397-3742; www.experian.com Trans Union: 1-800-888-4213; www.transunion.com The three nationwide consumer credit reporting companies have set up a toll-free telephone number and one central web site for ordering free reports: 1-877-322-8228; www.annualcreditreport.com A credit report that includes late payments, delinquencies or defaults will result in a low credit score and could mean not getting a loan or having to pay a much higher interest rate. The higher your score, the less risk you represent to the lender. Review your credit report at least once a year to make sure all information is accurate. If you find an error, the Fair Credit Reporting Act requires credit reporting companies and those reporting information to them to correct the mistake. To start the process of fixing an error:
  • Contact the credit reporting company online, by fax or certified letter, identifying the creditor you have a dispute with and the nature of the error.
  • Send the credit reporting company verifiable information, such as canceled checks or receipts, supporting your complaint.
  • The credit reporting company must investigate your complaint within 30 days and get back to you with its results.
  • Contact the creditor if the credit reporting company investigation does not result in correction of the error. When you resolve the dispute, ask the creditor to send the credit reporting company a correction. If the issue remains unresolved, you have the right to explain in a statement that will go on your credit report. For example, if you did not pay a car repair bill because the mechanic didn’t fix the problem, the unpaid bill may show up on your credit report, but so will your explanation.
Keep your good name Every month, go back to your budget and plan carefully to ensure your bills are paid before their due dates. Makes sure you pay your bills on time. You may want to have your paycheck set up for direct deposit so you don’t have to scramble to get to the bank on payday. For example, if you get paid twice a month. Using your first paycheck pay your mortgage or rent (set up on auto debit), cable TV and utility bills. From the second check make your car payment (also on auto debit) and have a monthly deposit automatically made to your savings account. Many find that “autopilot” really simplifies budgeting and saving. DIRECT DEPOSIT & YOU Many people who receive federal benefits checks, such as Social Security, Supplemental Security Income, Veterans Affairs or other government checks, enroll in direct deposit. Not only is it safer (no direct deposit has ever been stolen), it is far more convenient, and it gives you more control over your money than a mailed check. Call the toll-free Go Direct helpline at (800) 333-1795or (800) 333-1792 en Español, or go to www.GoDirect.org for more information and other sign-up options. ELECTRONIC TRANSFER ACCOUNT For a low-cost option for direct deposit, consider an ETA account. The Electronic Transfer Account, or ETASM, allows you to have your federal benefit, wage, salary and retirement payments deposited directly into your bank account—automatically, electronically and safely. Open a low-cost ETA at a federally insured bank, credit union, or savings and loan. Financial institutions offering the ETA have decals in their windows or lobbies identifying them as certified ETA providers. To find an ETA provider in your area, visit the ETA web site, www.eta-find.gov, or call toll-free, (888) 382-3311. If you believe you are too deep in debt:
  • Discuss your options with your creditors before you miss a payment.
  • Seek expert help, such as Consumer Credit Counseling Services, listed in your local telephone directory.
  • Avoid “credit repair” companies that charge a fee. Many of these are scams.
Save money by choosing the right loan If you have good credit, you may want to take out a loan to purchase a house or to cover educational expenses—both are investments in the future. But regardless of how the money is spent, a loan is a liability, or debt, and decreases your wealth. So choose loans carefully. Shop and negotiate for the lowest interest rate. The interest you save can be invested to build wealth. Banks charge varying interest rates over the term of the loan. Your credit score may determine which interest rate you are offered. Use an online auto loan calculator to compare rates. Save money by paying loans off early You can save interest expense by increasing your monthly payments or choosing a shorter payment term on your loan. For example, a planner, knows a new car would cost more than the sticker price because you would have to pay interest on the loan from the bank. After checking options, it’s wise to choose a shorter payment term with higher payments. Budget enough money each month to make the higher payments. By doing this, you will reduce the amount of interest you ultimately pay. Avoid the trap of getting “upside down”—owing more on the car than it is worth when you sell or trade it in. You could have your car paid for in three years and plan on driving it for at least eight years. Once your car is paid for, you can continue to budget for the car payment but will invest the money to further build your wealth. Take steps to control your debt As you can see, a big part of building wealth is making wise choices about debt. You need to maximize assets and minimize liabilities to maximize net worth. To manage debt, you need to know how much you have and develop strategies to control it. If you want to reduce credit card debts, analyze the debt and develop a strategy. List the balance, interest rate and monthly interest on each of your credit cards, check your credit score and shop for the best rate on a new credit card. Then he transfers all balances to that new card. Cut up the old credit cards and use the interest saved to pay toward the principal balance. Use the new card only for emergencies. Protect Your Wealth It is unwise to be too sure of one’s own wisdom. It is healthy to be reminded that the strongest might weaken and the wisest might err. Mahatma Gandhi Working hard to create personal wealth, you need to protect it. People acquire insurance to protect themselves from major financial loss. Insurance is simply a promise of reimbursement for a loss in return for a premium paid. When shopping for insurance products, consumers should match their needs with what the product offers and seek out the best deal. A solid credit history is also important because insurers use credit information to price homeowners’ insurance policies. You can buy insurance to cover all kinds of risks, but basic needs can be met with property, health and life insurance.
TOOLS FOR INVESTING Once you have a good savings foundation, you may want to diversify your assets among different types of investments. Diversification can help smooth out potential ups and downs of your investment returns. Investing is not a get-rich-quick scheme. Smart investors take a long-term view, putting money into investments regularly and keeping it invested for five, 10, 15, 20 or more years. Bonds — Lending Your Money When you buy bonds, you are lending money to a federal or state agency, municipality or other issuer, such as a corporation. A bond is like an IOU. The issuer promises to pay a stated rate of interest during the life of the bond and repay the entire face value when the bond comes due or reaches maturity. The interest a bond pays is based primarily on the credit quality of the issuer and current interest rates. Firms like Moody’s Investor Service and Standard & Poor’s rate bonds. With corporate bonds, the company’s bond rating is based on its financial picture. The rating for municipal bonds is based on the creditworthiness of the governmental or other public entity that issues it. Issuers with the greatest likelihood of paying back the money has the highest ratings, and their bonds will pay an investor a lower interest rate. Remember, the lower the risk, the lower the expected return. A bond may be sold at face value (called par) or at a premium or discount. For example, when prevailing interest rates are lower than the bond’s stated rate, the selling price of the bond rises above its face value. It is sold at a premium. Conversely, when prevailing interest rates are higher than the bond’s stated rate, the selling price of the bond is discounted below face value. When bonds are purchased, they may be held to maturity or traded. Savings bonds. U.S. savings bonds are government-issued and government-backed. There are different types of savings bonds, each with slightly different features and advantages. Series I bonds are indexed for inflation. The earnings rate on this type of bond combines a fixed rate of return with the annualized rate of inflation. Savings bonds can be purchased in denominations ranging from $50 to $10,000. Treasury bonds, bills and notes. The bonds the U.S. Treasury issues are sold to pay for an array of government activities and are backed by the full faith and credit of the federal government. Treasury bondsare securities with terms of more than 10 years. Interest is paid semiannually. The U.S. government also issues securities known as Treasury bills and notes. Treasury bills are short-term securities with maturities of three months, six months or one year. They are sold at a discount from their face value, and the difference between the cost and what you are paid at maturity is the interest you earn. Treasury notes are interest-bearing securities with maturities ranging from two to 10 years. Interest payments are made every six months. Treasury Inflation Protected Securities (TIPS) offer investors a chance to buy a security that keeps pace with inflation. Interest is paid on the inflation-adjusted principal. Bonds, bills and notes are sold in increments of $1,000. These securities, along with U.S. savings bonds, can be purchased directly from the Treasury through Treasury Direct at www.treasurydirect.gov. Some government-issued bonds offer special tax advantages. There is no state or local income tax on the interest earned from Treasury and savings bonds. And in most cases, interest earned from municipal bonds is exempt from federal and state income tax. Typically, higher income investors buy these bonds for their tax benefits. Stocks — Owning Part of a Company When you buy stock, you become a part owner of the company and are known as a stockholder, or shareholder. Stockholders can make money in two ways — receiving dividend payments and selling stock that has appreciated. A dividend is an income distribution by a corporation to its shareholders, usually made quarterly. Stock appreciation is an increase in the value of stock in the company, generally based on its ability to make money and pay a dividend. However, if the company doesn’t perform as expected, the stock’s value may go down. There is no guarantee you will make money as a stockholder. In purchasing shares of stock, you take a risk on the company making a profit and paying a dividend or seeing the value of its stock go up. Before investing in a company, learn about its past financial performance, management, products and how the stock has been valued in the past. Learn what the experts say about the company and the relationship of its financial performance and stock price. Successful investors are well informed. Mutual Funds — Investing in Many Companies Mutual funds are established to invest many people’s money in many firms. When you buy mutual fund shares, you become a shareholder of a fund that has invested in many other companies. By diversifying, a mutual fund spreads risk across numerous companies rather than relying on just one to perform well. Mutual funds have varying degrees of risk. They also have costs associated with owning them, such as management fees, which will vary depending on the type of investments the fund makes. Before investing in a mutual fund, learn about its past performance, the companies it invests in, how it is managed and the fees investors are charged. Learn what the experts say about the fund and its competitors. Stocks, bonds and mutual funds can be purchased through a full service broker if you need investment advice, from a discount broker, or even directly from some companies and mutual funds. Remember, when investing in these products:
  • Find good information to help you make informed decisions.
  • Make sure you know and understand all the costs associated with buying, selling and managing your investments.
  • Beware of investments that seem too good to be true; they probably are.
Invest for Retirement Have you ever thought about how much money you will need when you retire? Will you save enough today to meet your future needs at prices higher than today’s due to inflation? Many people don’t save enough for retirement. For example, suppose you are 20 years old and would like to have $1 million when you retire at age 65. If you can invest $13,719 today, it will grow to $1 million over the next 45 years if it earns a constant 10 percent return, compounded annually. You never have to add another dime to your initial investment. INDIVIDUAL RETIREMENT ACCOUNTS An individual retirement account (IRA) lets you build wealth and retirement security. The money you invest in an IRA grows tax-free until you retire and are ready to withdraw it. You can open an IRA at a bank, brokerage firm, mutual fund or insurance company. IRAs are subject to certain income limitations and other requirements. You can contribute up to $4,000 a year to a traditional IRA, as long as you earn $4,000 a year or more. A married couple with only one person working outside the home may contribute a combined total of $8,000 to an IRA and a spousal IRA. Individuals 50 years of age or older may make an additional “catch-up” contribution of $1,000 a year, for a total annual contribution of $5,000. Money invested in an IRA is deductible from current-year taxes if you are not covered by a retirement plan where you work and your income is below a certain limit. You don’t pay taxes on the money in a traditional IRA until it is withdrawn. All withdrawals are taxable, and there generally are penalties on money withdrawn before age 59½. However, you can make certain withdrawals without penalty, such as to pay for higher education, to purchase your first home, to cover certain un-reimbursed medical expenses or to pay medical insurance premiums if you are out of work. A Roth IRA is funded by after-tax earnings; you do not deduct the money you pay in from your current income. However, after age 59½ you can withdraw the principal and any interest or appreciated value tax-free. 401(k) Plans Many companies offer a 401(k) plan for employees’ retirement. Participants authorize a certain percentage of their before-tax salary to be deducted from their paycheck and put into a 401(k). Many times, 401(k) funds are professionally managed and employees have a choice of investments that vary in risk. Employees are responsible for learning about the investment choices offered. By putting a percentage of your salary into a 401(k), you reduce the amount of pay subject to federal and state income tax. Tax-deferred contributions and earnings make up the best one-two punch in investing. In addition, your employer may match a portion of every dollar you invest in the 401(k), up to a certain percentage or dollar amount. As long as the money remains in your 401(k), it’s tax-deferred. Withdrawals for any purpose are taxable, and withdrawals before age 59 ½ are subject to a penalty. Take full advantage of the retirement savings programs your company offers—and understand thoroughly how they work. They are great ways to build wealth. Qualified Plans If you’re self-employed, don’t worry. There is a retirement plan for you. A qualified plan (formerly referred to as a Keogh plan) is a tax-deferred plan designed to help self-employed workers save for retirement. The most attractive feature of a qualified plan is the high maximum contribution—up to $42,000 annually. The contributions and investment earnings grow tax-free until they are withdrawn, when they are taxed as ordinary income. Withdrawals before age 59 ½ are subject to a penalty. Check the IRS web site — www.irs.gov — for current information on tax-deferred investments. Investing in Your House You know you are ready to buy a home when you have reduced your debt, increased your savings and have a sizable down payment saved. By doing these things, you will have equity in your home from the start. Equity is the difference between the market value of a house and the balance on a mortgage. As you pay your mortgage, equity is increased. Over time, a house may rise in value—generating more money if you choose to sell it. Knowing that the more equity you have in your house, the wealthier you will be, it may be wise to take a 15-year mortgage rather than the more traditional 30-year mortgage. This will enable you to own your house in 15 years. Of course, you will make higher monthly payments on your mortgage, but you will build equity quicker and ultimately pay less interest. Start Your Own Business You can also start and invest in your own business as part of a wealth-creation plan. This requires planning, know-how, savings and an entrepreneurial spirit. Starting a small business can be risky, but it is one of the most significant ways individuals have to create personal wealth.
Assets – Liabilities = Net Worth A wealth-creating asset is a possession that generally increases in value or provides a return, such as:
  • A savings account.
  • A retirement plan.
  • Stocks and bonds.
  • A house.
Some possessions (like your car, big-screen TV, boat and clothes) are assets, but they aren’t wealth-creating assets because they don’t earn money or rise in value. A new car drops in value the second it’s driven off the lot. A car is a tool that provides transportation, but it’s not a wealth-creating asset. liability, also called debt, is money you owe, such as:
  • A home mortgage.
  • Credit card balances.
  • A car loan.
  • Hospital and other medical bills.
  • Student loans.
Net worth is the difference between your assets (what you own) and your liabilities (what you owe). Your net worth is your wealth. BUDGET TO SAVE SET FINANCIAL GOALS  If you make a good income each year and spend it all, you are not getting wealthier. You are just living high. Thomas J. Stanley and William D. Danko, The Millionaire Next Door Most people who have built wealth didn’t do so overnight. They got wealthy by setting goals and striving to reach them. A personal wealth-creation strategy is based on specific goals. In preparing your goals:
  • Be realistic.
  • Establish time frames.
  • Devise a plan.
  • Be flexible; goals can change.
DEVELOP A BUDGET AND LIVE BY IT When it comes to finances, people generally fall into the following groups. Where do you fit in? Planners control their financial affairs. They budget to save. Strugglers have trouble keeping their heads above rough financial waters. They find it difficult to budget to save. Deniers refuse to see that they’re in financial trouble. So they don’t see a need to budget to save. Impulsives seek immediate gratification. They spend today and let tomorrow take care of itself. They couldn’t care less about budgeting to save. A budget allows you to:
  • Understand where your money goes.
  • Ensure you don’t spend more than you make.
  • Find uses for your money that will increase your wealth.
To develop a budget, you need to:
  • Calculate your monthly income.
  • Track your daily expenses.
  • Determine how much you spend on monthly bills.
The Value of Assets Wealth-creating assets are possessions that generally increase in value over time or provide a return. Depreciation is the decrease in an asset’s value over time. Items that wear out or have a falling price depreciate. THREATS TO WEALTH-BUILDING ASSETS Risk of default If the institution or agency fails to repay the original amount of the investment, the entire amount can be lost. Risk of falling market price When the asset is bought and sold in an open market, the price can go down or up. Risk of lost purchasing power If savings do not grow more quickly than the rate of inflation, the saver is harmed. Risk of liquidity Can an investment be quickly or easily converted to cash by selling the asset? Save and Invest Take the power of compound interest seriously — and then save. Dwight R. Lee and Richard B. McKenzie, Getting Rich in America You have budgeted and identified an amount to save monthly. Where are you going to put your savings? By investing, you put the money you save to work making more money and increasing your wealth. An investment is anything you acquire for future income or benefit. Investments increase by generating income (interest or dividends) or by growing (appreciating) in value. Income earned from your investments and any appreciation in the value of your investments increase your wealth. There is an art to choosing ways to invest your savings. Good investments will make money; bad investments will cost money. Do your homework. Gather as much information as you can. Seek advice from personnel at your bank or other trained financial experts. Read newspapers, magazines and other publications. Identify credible information sources on the Internet. Join an investment club. Compound interest helps you build wealth faster. Interest is paid on previously earned interest as well as on the original deposit or investment. For example, $5,000 deposited in a bank at 6 percent interest for a year earns $308 if the interest is compounded monthly. In just 5 years, the $5,000 will grow to $6,744. UNDERSTAND THE RISK–EXPECTED RETURN RELATIONSHIP An investment in knowledge always pays the best interest. Benjamin Franklin When you are saving and investing, the amount of expected return is based on the amount of risk you take with your money. Generally, the higher the risk of losing money, the higher the expected return. For less risk, an investor will expect a smaller return. For example, a savings account at a financial institution is fully insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. up to $250,000. The return—or interest paid on your savings—will generally be less than the expected return on other types of investments. On the other hand, an investment in a stock or bond is not insured. The money you invest may be lost or the value reduced if the investment doesn’t perform as expected. HOW MUCH RISK DO YOU WANT TO TAKE? Here are some things to think about when determining the amount of risk that best suits you. Financial goals. How much money do you want to accumulate over a certain period of time? Your investment decisions should reflect your wealth-creation goals. Time horizon. How long can you leave your money invested? If you will need your money in one year, you may want to take less risk than you would if you won’t need your money for 20 years. Financial risk tolerance. Are you in a financial position to invest in riskier alternatives? You should take less risk if you cannot afford to lose your investment or have its value fall. Inflation risk. This reflects savings’ and investments’ sensitivity to the inflation rate. For example, while some investments such as a savings account have no risk of default, there is the risk that inflation will rise above the interest rate on the account. If the account earns 5 percent interest, inflation must remain lower than 5 percent a year for you to realize a profit. TOOLS FOR SAVING The simplest way to begin earning money on your savings is to open a savings account at a financial institution. You can take advantage of compound interest, with no risk. Financial institutions offer a variety of savings accounts, each of which pays a different interest rate. TYPES OF SAVINGS ACCOUNTS Savings account (in general)
  • Access your money at any time.
  • Earn interest.
  • Move money easily from one account to another.
  • Savings insured by the FDIC up to $250,000.
Money market account
  • Earn interest.
  • Pay no fees if you maintain a minimum balance.
  • May offer check-writing services.
  • Savings insured by the FDIC up to $250,000.
Certificate of deposit (CD)
  • Earn interest during the term (three months, six months, etc.).
  • Must leave the deposit in the account for the entire term to avoid an early withdrawal penalty.
  • Receive the principal and interest at the end of the term.
  • Savings insured by the FDIC up to $250,000.
Individual Development Accounts In some communities, people whose income is below a certain level can open an individual development account (IDA) as part of a money-management program organized by a local nonprofit organization. IDAs are generally opened at a local bank. Deposits made by the IDA account holder are often matched by deposits from a foundation, government agency or other organization. IDAs can be used for buying a first home, paying for education or job training, or starting a small business. Training programs on budgeting, saving and managing credit are frequently part of IDA programs.
Financial freedom is the power to do what you will with your life without being forever bound by lack of money and over burdened by debt. This worthwhile goal can be achieved by anyone through careful planning and persistence. Just follow these steps:
  • Pay yourself first
  • Control your spending
  • Get free of debt
  • Build a contingency fund
  • Become an informed investor
  • Give
Achieving financial freedom is a gradual process that will happen as you implement all these simple steps in your life. Pay yourself first Every paycheck, keep some of your money for yourself and keep it. It takes money to make money, so goes the old saying. To achieve financial freedom, you’ll need some seed money that can grow into a substantial nest egg. Take a percentage or a fixed amount from each paycheck and add it to your seed money, at least 10%, if possible. This is your investment money. Do not use it for anything else. Every paycheck be sure to pay yourself first. With time and persistence you’ll soon have the funds to start making profitable investments. You’ll be a lender and not a borrower. Reinvest all profits and dividends to maximize the growth of your nest egg. Control your spending Make sure that your spending is less than your earnings. When you find yourself in a hole, the first thing to do is STOP DIGGING. You may have to create and follow a budget. Creating a budget is easy; following it may be hard. Start out by tracking your current spending habits. Visit www.financesoftware.net for software that will help you. Summarize your spending into general categories such as Food, Clothing, Entertainment, etc. Then you can decide which categories you can cut and by how much. Continue to track your spending and do your best to stay within the limits you set for yourself. Get free of debt Debt is bad, “the borrower is the slave of the lender”, and none of us wants to be a slave. There are some debts that may be helpful, such as business debts to increase profits, home mortgages, and car loans. Avoid any other borrowing, even pay cash for your car if possible. Increase the size of the payments you’re making. Pick the creditor who charges the highest interest and increase that payment by as much as you can. When that creditor is paid off, take the payment amount and apply it to the next creditor. Continue this process until all are paid off. Destroy and close all or most of your credit card accounts. Build a contingency fund Life is full of unexpected surprises; the car breaks down, the furnace fails, we lose our job, etc.. To prevent these occasional events from derailing your financial plans, you need funds just for emergencies. This will help you avoid borrowing or dipping into your seed money. Every paycheck, take a percentage or a fixed amount of money and put it into your contingency fund. As the money in this fund grows, you will have the peace of mind that comes from being better prepared for life’s little surprises. For life’s big surprises, buy insurance. Become an informed investor In this day and age, there are endless opportunities for investments that can make or lose you money. In order to make money and not lose money, you’ll need to start educating yourself. As a start, here are some concepts it will be good for you to know. RETURN is how much profit you’re likely to make on a given investment, usually expressed as a percentage or a range of percentages. RISK is the possibility of something bad happening, like losing money. A SCAM is a false investment opportunity presented by lying thieves trying to steal your money. DIVERSIFICATION is the strategy of not having all your eggs in one basket to spread and minimize risk. An INVESTMENT STRATEGY is a long term approach to making money. Visit www.financesoftware.net for more investment ideas and related software. Give Begin to give away some of your money. “For whatsoever a man sows, that shall he also reap.” If you are religious, give to your religion. If you are not, then give to the poor, or to “save the earth”, or whatever noble cause appeals to you. Not only does giving help free you from the mental and emotional grip of money, God Himself will generously respond to more than repay what you have freely and joyfully given away. Conclusion You can make it happen. Establish your strategy and stick to it. Implement all these steps in your life and your financial freedom will soon come:
  • Pay yourself first
  • Control your spending
  • Get free of debt
  • Build a contingency fund
  • Become an informed investor
  • Give
Now, you’re on your way. Copyright © Richard Pullman Richard Pullman is the Webmaster for www.financesoftware.net and has a bachelor’s degree in finance and economics. You have permission to publish this article either electronically or in print, free of charge, as long as the author bylines are included. A courtesy copy of your publication would be appreciated. Please email to richard@financesoftware.net article source: adzines.com
(ARA) – Buyers are still clamoring for real estate deals in this turbulent market. Foreclosures and short sales offer some of the best bargains, but also have a higher risk level. Still, more than four in five adults think foreclosures and short sales can be good deals, according to a recent American Society of Home Inspectors (ASHI) survey. Some analysts say the rebound has begun and home prices may rise by the end of 2012. This means now may be buyers’ last chance to take advantage of affordable properties and low interest rates. If you want to score a bargain before the housing market recovers, you’ll need to follow a few rules to invest with certainty. Make a wise investment by adhering to these five rules while shopping distressed properties: Rule 1: Position yourself for success Before starting your search, get preapproved for a mortgage so when a good deal presents itself, you’re positioned to submit a bid right away to be the first offer on the bank’s desk. Work with an experienced real estate agent who can help guide you through the daunting sea of foreclosures and short sales. Bidding can be complicated and time-consuming, especially when working with a home sale needing bank approval. A good agent will know how to navigate through the paperwork and red tape. Rule 2: Do your research A real estate agent can help you with research, but it’s wise to do some on your own. Are there any undisclosed liens on the property? Is the seller behind on his property taxes? What permit records does the city have on file? This information will be critical during decision-making. Work with your agent to ensure the contract requires any delinquent taxes, liens or assessments will be paid prior to you taking ownership of the property. Rule 3: Always get a home inspection  Eighty-four percent of adults surveyed by ASHI said they would be more likely to purchase a distressed property after a home inspection has determined its condition. A home inspection gives you the confidence to move forward with your purchase because you’ll have as much knowledge as possible about the condition of the property. An inspector will visually examine the condition of the home’s roof, attic and insulation, foundation, basement and structural components, as well as interior plumbing and electrical systems. Be sure to find an ASHI-Certified Inspector (ACI) to ensure your inspector is experienced, as many states have minimal licensing requirements. To find a local ACI, use ASHI’s “Find an Inspector” tool on www.ASHI.org. Rule 4: Budget for repairs  When looking at short sales and foreclosures, remember price is only one aspect to consider. A home will almost always require some type of repair. After receiving your inspection report, you can estimate costs associated with necessary repairs, maintenance or energy-efficient improvements. Rule 5: Assess the neighborhood Location should be a top consideration when purchasing real estate, and in a tough housing market, it’s even more important. A home has limited worth if it’s located in a less desirable neighborhood. High foreclosure rates can turn a once-desirable neighborhood into one many might likely avoid. These locations are likely to see a slower recovery than more populated or favorable areas less affected by the economy. Make location as important as price when making a purchase decision. Protect yourself with knowledge and expert advice to make a confident, smart decision about your largest investment.
Housing Site Loans www.rurdev.usda.gov/HAD-Site_Loans.html Housing Site Loans are made to provide financing for the purchase and development of housing sites for low- and moderate-income families. HUD- Local Home Buying Programs www.hud.gov/buying/localbuying.cfm In addition to HUD’s mortgage insurance programs, there may be programs sponsored by your state or local government or other organizations. Guaranteed Housing Loan www.rurdev.usda.gov/HAD-Guaranteed_Housing_Loans.html Applicants for loans may have an income of up to 115% of the median income for the area. Area income limits for this program are here. Families must be without adequate housing, but be able to afford the mortgage payments, including taxes and insurance. In addition, applicants must have reasonable credit histories. National Council of State Housing Agencies (NCSHA) – Homebuyer Tax Credit HFA Loan Programs www.ncsha.org/resource-center/homebuyer-tax-credit-hfa-loan-programs To help buyers that need down payment and closing cost assistance when purchasing a home with the tax credit, a number of HFAs are offering special short-term second loans to qualified buyers. These loans are available for little or no interest and may be repaid with the homebuyer tax credit refund. In addition, most states offer 2nd loans or grants to help first-time home buyers purchase a home. These work much like the tax credit loan programs but the loan term is longer. Information on these programs can be obtained from the websites of the State HFA’s. Mutual Self-Help Loans www.rurdev.usda.gov/HAD-Self-Help_Loans.html The Section 502 Mutual Self-Help Housing Loan program is used primarily to help very low- and low-income households construct their own homes. Self-Help Technical Assistance Grants www.rurdev.usda.gov/HAD-Self-Help_Grants.html To provide Self-Help Technical Assistance Grants to provide financial assistance to qualified nonprofit organizations and public bodies that will aid needy very low and low-income individuals and their families to build homes in rural areas by the self -help method. Any State, political subdivision, private or public nonprofit corporation is eligible to apply. Technical and Supervisory Assistance Grants www.rurdev.usda.gov/HAD-TSA_Grants.html To assist low-income rural families in obtaining adequate housing to meet their family’s needs and/or to provide the necessary guidance to promote their continued occupancy of already adequate housing. These objectives will be accomplished through the establishment or support of housing delivery and counseling projects run by eligible applicants.
(ARA) – For those considering buying a home, the current real estate market presents some unique opportunities. One of the side effects of the economic roller coaster ride of the past few years is that home prices have gone down and more homes have gone on the market. For buyers, that means more choices and better deals. However, those same tumultuous years also can also teach buyers a lesson: Make smart buying decisions and be wise with your finances. Impulsive buying is never a good idea when it comes to a purchase as significant as a home, but it was something of a trend at the height of the mid-2000s. Now, with banks lending far more cautiously, you need to be absolutely certain that your finances are in order – and healthy – to be able to get the best deal on your purchase. There are a number of steps you can take to get ready to buy a home, and you might need to work on them simultaneously. Consider that you’ll need to start saving, if you haven’t already, but you’ll also need to review your credit score and do what you can to either maintain it or work toward healthier credit. Both of these tasks will help make the home-buying process better for you. Your credit is an important factor in determining the terms under which you can get a mortgage. Broadly speaking, the better your credit is, the more positively you’ll be viewed by lenders – and that can lead to better interest rates. And because you’ll be paying off your home for years to come, it’s important to get the best rate possible. Start by checking your credit report. You’re entitled to one free check of your report, from TransUnion and other credit reporting agencies every year. As much as you need to check your report to find out what shape your credit is in, it’s also essential to review it for inaccuracies or fraudulent activity, both of which can have a negative impact on your score. If your credit health needs some work, start taking action immediately. Paying bills on time, reducing your overall debt and limiting new credit inquiries can all help to build your credit – but be patient as it can take time for your positive actions to take effect. Nevertheless, the sooner you make the effort, the sooner you’ll see results. Making a prudent decision about buying a house comes down to an honest assessment of what you can afford. Keep in mind that you might be approved for a loan that’s larger than what is practical for you to afford. While it may be tempting to buy a pricier house, the stress of struggling to make payments could diminish your enjoyment of your new home and even put you at financial risk. One rule of thumb is that most borrowers can afford a home loan that runs about two and a half times their annual salary. Buying a home is a complex process, but one that is ultimately very rewarding when done right. By organizing your finances well in advance, you’ll help set yourself up for success. For more information about credit and buying a home, visit www.transunion.com
Things to Know When Buying a Home Buying your first home will likely be one of the most exciting and scary times of your life. Beyond the basic considerations – location, number of bathrooms, ranch style vs. multilevel – there are a number of important financial factors to determine before deciding which house is right for you.
  1. Determine how a home purchase will affect your current lifestyle. In addition to the overall expense of the home, it is important to consider how long you plan to stay in the home, as well as your overall debt, both on credit cards and other loans. According to Investopedia.com, affordability should be the No. 1 thing you look for in a home, but you also need to be stable enough to know you are going to want to live in the home you pick for at least 10 years. If not, you could get stuck in a home you can’t afford in a city you’re ready to leave.Not surprisingly, location not only affects affordability, but also potential resale value. Amy Hoak of MarketWatch states, “Homes located within walking distance of amenities such as schools, parks and shopping aren’t only more convenient for their owners, often they’re also worth more than homes in neighborhoods where driving is the rule.” Consider your lifestyle when you choose a location. Spending more to live within strolling distance of your favorite shops and restaurants is only valuable if you’ll take advantage of that proximity. BankRate.com offers a handy tool to help predict your monthly mortgage payments in different communities.
  2. Consider your options for purchasing a home. Building a new home gives you greater control over style and finishes, though your move-in date will depend on the construction schedule. Newer existing homes will likely require fewer updates than an older home, but may be priced at a premium. If you are shopping for a starter home, consider your plans for the future. A smaller house may require less home maintenance and upkeep, but if you are looking for a larger long term investment and a place to grow and raise a family, opting for more space from the get-go may make the most sense.
  3. Whatever the condition or age of the home you purchase, there’s always the chance you’ll want to make some changes, such as renovating a bathroom or upgrading your kitchen, or remodeling parts of the home to accommodate an expanding family. Try to anticipate and factor these costs into your total budget before purchasing a home. When it’s time for these changes, will you be ready financially?According to Consumer Reports, kitchen and bathrooms are at the top of homeowner’s wish lists in terms of rooms that need work. Luckily, updating the kitchen or bathroom to reflect your personal style doesn’t have to be an expensive task. Replacing your plumbing fixtures and finishes can dramatically transform the space. No matter if your design preference is modern or contemporary, Delta Faucet offers a wide range of styles and designs at various price points to meet your needs. For instance, the Linden kitchen and bath collection, in the Venetian Bronze finish, offers a striking combination of transitional style and old-world charm. Carry that look throughout the space with coordinating accessories and a fresh coat of paint for an affordable room makeover.Buying a home is one of life’s major milestones. If you are just starting the house hunting process, consider starting your search online at sites such as Zillow, Houzz, and Pinterest to get a feel for the homes and decor styles that appeal to you most. In addition to finding styles you like, this research will also help you find potential options within your price range. Remember, before making any purchases, consider your total budget and make sure you’re prepared for not just the mortgage, but also any necessary improvements.
(ARA) – A still murky economy and uncertain real estate market may have you wondering if buying a home is a good idea. Whether you’re thinking about buying, or already have and just need some affirmation, you may find it comforting to know there are still plenty of good reasons for financially stable people to buy a house. Here are a few: 1. Homeownership can help make good credit even better. If your credit is in poor shape, you’ll want to monitor it before seeking a mortgage. But if you have good credit, live within your means, and consistently make good financial decisions, a mortgage can be the kind of “good debt” that helps your overall financial health. Making regular payments on a mortgage shows potential lenders that you’re a less risky candidate for a home loan. Before you begin home shopping, it’s a good idea to check your credit. Enrolling in a product like freecreditscore.com can help you better understand and leverage your credit. 2. A mortgage can function like an automatic savings plan. By now, you’ve read the news reports about how little we Americans save these days. Well, every year you pay on your fixed-rate mortgage, is a year of building equity, and equity is like money in the bank. When it’s time to sell – whether you’ve stayed in your home seven years or the full 30 year term – you’ll have created equity and should be able to sell your house for more than you owe. 3. Homeownership comes with plenty of financial perks, including an income tax credit for property taxes you pay on your home. For detailed information on tax breaks check out IRS.gov. Buying a home also affords you the opportunity to halt your housing costs. Rent will always go up from year to year, but if you have a fixed-rate mortgage (avoid adjustable rates) your biggest annual expense – housing costs – will be locked-in. 4. Mortgage interest is a good deal when stacked up against other types of interest that don’t do much for you – such as high credit card interest rates or low rates on savings accounts and CDs. Mortgage rates are low right now, meaning you can pay less over the life of a loan than at practically any other time in recent history. Plus, it’s the only kind of interest that you can deduct from your taxes. 5. Prices are still relatively low and inventory is high. It’s been a buyer’s market for a long time, but that’s going to change. The question is: when will the market start to improve in your area, taking home prices with it? You’ll have to do some legwork and astute research to determine when is the best time for you to buy. If you monitor your credit and are on a sound financial footing, buying a home can still be a good idea. And now is as good a time as any to make your purchase.
  1. Get your credit in good shape Make sure your credit history is in good shape since you’ll probably need to get a mortgage to buy your house. Get your credit report months ahead of house hunting. Check the facts and get any errors on the report corrected.
  2. You can buy home with less than 20 percent down You might qualify for a low interest mortgage from a private or public lender that only requires a down payment as low as 3 percent of the sale price.
  3. Buy a house you can afford Generally, you shouldn’t buy a home that is more than twice your annual take home pay. Use one of the many online calculators to determine how much house you can afford when you factor in your debts and expenses.
  4. Don’t buy a house for the short term Buy a house only if you plan to live in it for a few years. Buying and selling a home is an expensive transaction. You could wind up losing money if you sell your home too soon after buying it.
  5. Buy a house in a good school district When you’re ready to sell, you’ll find that strong school districts are a priority for many home buyers. Property values are highest in areas with good schools.
  6. Research before you start bidding Find out what other homes in the area have been selling for. Once you get an average, your opening bid can fall just under that and the negotiating can begin.
  7. Work with a Buyer’s Agent An exclusive Buyer’s Agent is a must to help you navigate the difficult home buying process. You can start your search online, but when it comes time to strategize and bid, you need someone who is on your side.
  8. Get pre-approved to hit the ground running It doesn’t make sense to house hunt when you don’t know how much house you can afford. If you find the house of your dreams before getting pre-approved, you won’t be able to make a serious offer. A pre-approval is based on your income, credit history and debt.
  9. When picking your mortgage, pay attention to points versus rate During the mortgage selection process, to get a lower interest rate you can usually choose between paying additional points –part of the interest paid at closing. It makes more sense to take the points if you plan to stay in the house beyond five years. Lower interest rates will save you more money down the line.
  10. Don’t buy a house without doing a home inspection The home inspector is an essential part of the equation. A home inspection is different from a home appraisal. A home appraisal by the bank helps them determine if the house is worth what you plan to pay. You should hire your own home inspector who has experience inspecting the type of home you are buying. A home inspector will find problems that may need repair before you move in. If there are major issues resulting from the inspection, you may be able to garner a reduction in the sale price of the house.
The HHC Nurse Career Ladder Phone: 212-442-3768 Free Certified Nurse Assistant (CNA) Training in New York If you live in the New York City area, you can apply for tuition free Nursing Assistant training through the Visiting Nurse Service. This program prepares students for certification and for a career working in the home health setting. Please note that you will need to pay a small fee for your textbook if you enter this training course. First Care of New York INC offers No Cost HHA/PCA training at its centers in the Bronx, Brooklyn and Queens. Their contact numbers are as follows: Bronx Office – 718-364-7251 Brooklyn Office – 718-675-6200 Queens Office – 718-478-1454 Office of Adult & Continuing Education (OACE) – Career and Technical Education (CTE) Offering over 900 classes for adults age 21 and over. There are four Adult Learning Centers located in Brooklyn, Manhattan, Queens, and the Bronx. OACE offers CTE courses which will provide adults with an opportunity to acquire technical, trade, construction or entrepreneurial skills enabling them to pursue meaningful employment and/or post-secondary education. CTE classes including courses such as Certified Nurse Assistant and Practical Nursing to prepare students for industry recognized certifications and city and state licenses. Casa Central 1401 N. California Ave, Chicago, IL 60622 (773) 782-8700 Casa Central offers a free Certified Nurse’s Assistance Program for people receiving public aid who have at least an eighth grade education. The program lasts five-and-a-half months. Students must be bilingual in English and Spanish. Casa Central assists students who have completed the program with job placement. For more information, call Casa Central.
DC Central Kitchen Through job training, healthy food distribution, and local farm partnerships, DC Central Kitchen offers path-breaking solutions to poverty, hunger, and poor health. Careers through Culinary Arts Program Careers through Culinary Arts Program (C-CAP) works with public schools across the country to prepare underserved high school students for college and career opportunities in the restaurant and hospitality industry. Fare Start FareStart is a culinary job training and placement program for homeless and disadvantaged individuals. Over the past 20 years, FareStart has provided opportunities for nearly 6,000 people to transform their lives, while also serving over 5 million meals to disadvantaged men, women, and children. Catalyst Kitchens Catalyst Kitchens is a collaborative network of organizations with a shared vision to empower lives through job training, self-generate revenue through social enterprise, and nourish bodies and minds through quality foodservice. The Culinary School at the Food Bank (302) 444-8076 The Culinary School at the Food Bank of Delaware is a WIA sponsored Charitable/Faith-Based Organization. Consortium for Worker Education 275 Seventh Ave., 18th Floor, Manhattan The Consortium for Worker Education is a non-profit group providing over 60,000 New Yorkers with free education and job training programs to further their possible career opportunities including Culinary and Artisan baking classes. CUNY CareerPATH at Kingsborough Community College CUNY CareerPATH at Kingsborough Community College provides career and college-focused occupational training, with integrated math skills instruction in Culinary Arts, Food and Beverage Service/Hospitality, and Community Health.
Alabama
Gadsden Job Corps Center 600 Valley Street PO Box 286 Gadsden, AL 35902 Tel: (256) 547-6222 Fax: (256) 547-9040 Montgomery Job Corps Center 1145 Air Base Boulevard Montgomery, AL 36108 Tel: (334) 262-8883 Fax: (334) 265-2339 Top
Alaska
Alaska Job Corps Center 800 E. Lynn Martin Drive Palmer, AK 99645 Tel: (907) 861-8800 Fax: (907) 861-8986 Top
Arizona
Fred G. Acosta Job Corps Center 901 S. Campbell Avenue Tucson, AZ 85719 Tel: (520) 792-3015 Fax: (520) 628-1552 Phoenix Job Corps Center 518 S. Third Street Phoenix, AZ 85004 Tel: (602) 254-5921 Fax: (602) 322-7071 Top
Arkansas
Cass Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center 21424 N. Highway 23 Ozark, AR 72949 Tel: (479) 667-3686 Fax: (479) 667-3989 Little Rock Job Corps Center 6900 Scott Hamilton Drive Little Rock, AR 72209 Tel: (501) 618-2500 Fax: (501) 570-0410 Ouachita Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center 570 Job Corps Road Royal, AR 71968 Tel: (501) 767-2707 Fax: (501) 321-3798 Top
California
Inland Empire Job Corps Center 3173 Kerry Street PO Box 9550 San Bernardino, CA 92427-9550 Tel: (909) 887-6305 Fax: (909) 473-1511 Long Beach Job Corps Center 1903 Santa Fe Avenue Long Beach, CA 90810-4050 Tel: (562) 983-1777 Fax: (562) 983-6393 Los Angeles Job Corps Center 1020 S. Olive Street Los Angeles, CA 90015 Tel: (213) 748-0135 Fax: (213) 741-5359 Sacramento Job Corps Center 3100 Meadowview Road Sacramento, CA 95832 Tel: (916) 394-0770 Fax: (916) 429-499 San Diego Job Corps Center 1325 Iris Avenue, Building 60 Imperial Beach, CA 91932-3751 Tel: (619) 429-8500 Fax: (619) 429-4909 San Jose Job Corps Center 3485 East Hills Drive San Jose, CA 95127-2970 Tel: (408) 254-5627 Fax: (408) 254-5663 Treasure Island Job Corps Center 351 H Avenue, Building 442 Treasure Island San Francisco, CA 94130-5027 Tel: (415) 277-2400 Fax: (415) 705-1776 Top
Colorado
Collbran Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center 57608 Highway 330 Collbran, CO 81624 Tel: (970) 487-3576 Fax: (970) 487-3823 Top
Connecticut
Hartford Job Corps Center 100 William Shorty Campbell Street Hartford, CT 06106 Tel: (860) 953-7201 Fax: (860) 952-0228 New Haven Job Corps Center 455 Wintergreen Avenue New Haven, CT 06515 Tel: (203) 397-3775 Fax: (203) 392-029 Top
Delaware
Wilmington Job Corps Center 9 Vandever Avenue Wilmington, DE 19802 Tel: (302) 575-1710 Fax: (302) 575-1713 Top
Florida
Gainesville Job Corps Center 5301 N.E. 40th Terrace Gainesville, FL 32609 Tel: (352) 377-2555 Fax: (352) 374-8257 Home Builders Institute – Project Craft 8200 South Palm Drive Pembroke Pines, FL – 33025 (954) 364-4441 Home Builders Institute – Project Craft provides construction Trades training and job placement for youth under the jurisdiction of the Department of Juvenile Justice. Training is open entry/skills exit with an expected duration of six months. Twenty-five percent of participants time is spent in the classroom and 75% of the time is spent training on community service/work based learning projects. Homestead Job Corps Center 12350 S.W. 285th Street Homestead, FL 33033 Tel: (305) 257-4800 Fax: (305) 257-1429 Jacksonville Job Corps Center 4811 Payne Stewart Drive Jacksonville, FL 32209 Tel: (904) 360-8200 Fax: (904) 632-5498 Miami Job Corps Center 3050 N.W. 183rd Street Miami, FL 33056 Tel: (305) 620-3100 Fax: (305) 626-7857 Pinellas County Job Corps Center 500 22nd Street South St. Petersburg, FL 33712 Tel: (727) 551-2900 Fax: (727) 551-2992 Boley Centers – St. Petersburg (727) 821-4819 Top
Georgia
Atlanta Job Corps Center 239 West Lake Avenue NW Atlanta, GA 30314 Tel: (404) 794-9512 Fax: (404) 794-8426 B.R.I.D.G.E of Columbus Columbus, GA – 31901-2112 (706) 322-6433 B.R.I.D.G.E of Columbus offers residents that have dropped out of school that are aged 18 – 24 and are unemployed or under employed , an opportunity to obtain their GED. The program is offered free of charge and includes bus passes and lunch. Brunswick Job Corps Center 4401 Glynco Industrial Park Brunswick, GA 31525 Tel: (912) 264-8843 Fax: (912) 267-7192 Turner Job Corps Center 2000 Schilling Avenue Albany, GA 31705-1524 Tel: (229) 883-8500 Fax: (229) 434-0383 Top
Hawaii
Hawaii Job Corps Center 41-467 Hihimanu Street Waimanalo, HI 96795 Tel: (808) 259-6070 Fax: (808) 259-7907 Maui Job Corps Center 500 Ike Drive Maui Makawao, HI 96768 Tel: (808) 579-8450 Fax: (808) 579-9498 Top
Idaho
Centennial Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center 3201 Ridgecrest Drive Nampa, ID 83687 Tel: (208) 442-4500 Fax: (208) 442-4506 Top
Illinois
Golconda Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center Route 1 Box 104A Golconda, IL 62938 Tel: (618) 285-6601 Fax: (618) 285-5296 Joliet Job Corps Center 1101 Mills Road Joliet, IL 60433 Tel: (815) 727-7677 Fax: (815) 723-7052 Paul Simon Chicago Job Corps Center 3348 S. Kedzie Avenue Chicago, IL 60623 Tel: (773) 847-9820 Fax: (773) 847-9823 Jobs for Youth 50 E. Washington, 4th Floor, Chicago, IL 60602 (312) 782-2086 Jobs for Youth is a free job placement program for individuals between 17 and 24 years of age. To qualify for the program, you must be a high school or GED graduate. Call to schedule an appointment for a placement test. After the placement test, you will be enrolled in 10 or 15 day workshop. Once you have completed the workshop, job developers will help you find a job. Top
Indiana
Atterbury Job Corps Center PO Box 187 Edinburgh, IN 46124 Tel: (812) 314-6000 Fax: (812) 314-6143 IndyPendence Job Corps Center 222 E. Ohio Street Suite 300 Indianapolis, IN 46204 Tel: (317) 524-6788 Fax: (317) 524-6798 Top
Iowa
Denison Job Corps Center 10 Opportunity Drive PO Box 610 Denison, IA 51442 Tel: (712) 263-4192 Fax: (712) 263-6910 Ottumwa Job Corps Center 15229 Truman Street Ottumwa, IA 52501 Tel: (641) 682-2000 Fax: (641) 682-0519 Top
Kansas
Flint Hills Job Corps Center 4620 Eureka Drive Manhattan, KS 66503 Tel: (785) 537-7222 Fax: (785) 537-9517 Top
Kentucky
Carl D. Perkins Job Corps Center 478 Meadows Branch Road Prestonsburg, KY 41653-1501 Tel: (606) 433-2256 Fax: (606) 433-5401 Earle C. Clements Job Corps Center 2302 U.S. Highway 60 East Morganfield, KY 42437-6608 Tel: (270) 389-2419 Fax: (270) 389-1134 Frenchburg Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center 6969 Tarr Ridge Road Frenchburg, KY 40322 Tel: (606) 768-2111 Fax: (606) 768-3080 Great Onyx Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center 3115 Ollie Ridge Road Mammoth Cave, KY 42259 Tel: (270) 286-4514 Fax: (270) 286-1120 Muhlenberg Job Corps Center 3875 State Route Highway 181 North Greenville, KY 42345 Tel: (270) 338-5460 Fax: (270) 338-3615 Pine Knot Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center PO Box 1990 132 Job Corps Road Pine Knot, KY 42635 Tel: (606) 354-2176 Fax: (606) 354-2170 Whitney M. Young Jr. Job Corps Center 8460 Shelbyville Road Simpsonville, KY 40067 Tel: (502) 722-8862 Fax: (866) 343-1899 Top
Louisiana
Carville Job Corps Center 5465 Point Clair Road Carville, LA 70721 Tel: (225) 642-0699 Fax: (225) 642-9564 New Orleans Job Corps Center 8825 Airline Highway New Orleans, LA 70118 Tel: (504) 484-3501 Fax: (504) 484-3598 Shreveport Job Corps Center 2815 Lillian Street Shreveport, LA 71109 Tel: (318) 227-9331 Fax: (318) 222-0768 Top
Maine
Loring Job Corps Center 36 Montana Road Limestone, ME 04750 Tel: (207) 328-4212 Fax: (207) 328-4219 Penobscot Job Corps Center 1375 Union Street Bangor, ME 04401 Tel: (207) 990-3000 Fax: (207) 942-9829 Top
Maryland
Woodland Job Corps Center 3300 Fort Mead Road Laurel, MD 20724 Tel: (301) 362-6000 Fax: (301) 362-6052 Woodstock Job Corps Center 10900 Old Court Road Woodstock, MD 21163 Tel: (410) 461-1100 Fax: (410) 461-5794 Top
Massachusetts
Grafton Job Corps Center 100 Pine Street North Grafton, MA 01536 Tel: (508) 887-7300 Fax: (508) 839-9781 Shriver Job Corps Center 270 Jackson Road Devens, MA 01434-5106 Tel: (978) 784-2600 Fax: (978) 784-2721 Westover Job Corps Center 103 Johnson Road Chicopee, MA 01022 Tel: (413) 593-4000 Fax: (413) 593-4091 Top
Michigan
Detroit Job Corps Center 11801 Woodrow Wilson Street Detroit, MI 48206 Tel: (313) 852-0300 Fax: (313) 865-8791 Flint-Genesee Job Corps Center 2400 N. Saginaw Street Flint, MI 48505 Tel: (810) 232-9102 Fax: (810) 232-6835 Gerald R. Ford Job Corps Center 110 Hall Street S.E. Grand Rapids, MI 49507 Tel: (616) 243-6877 Fax: (616) 243-4012 Top
Minnesota
Hubert H. Humphrey Job Corps Center 1480 N. Snelling Avenue St. Paul, MN 55108 Tel: (651) 642-1133 Fax: (651) 642-0123 Top
Mississippi
Finch-Henry Job Corps Center 821 Highway 51 South Batesville, MS 38606 Tel: (662) 563-4656 Fax: (662) 563-1644 Gulfport Job Corps Center 3300 20th Street Gulfport, MS 39501-4311 Tel: (228) 863-1141 Fax: (228) 863-1142 Mississippi Job Corps Center 400 Harmony Road Crystal Springs, MS 39059 Tel: (601) 892-3348 Fax: (601) 892-3719 Top
Missouri
Excelsior Springs Job Corps Center 701 St. Louis Avenue Excelsior Springs, MO 64024 Tel: (816) 629-3111 Fax: (816) 629-3842 Mingo Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center 4253 State Highway T Puxico, MO 63960-9585 Tel: (573) 222-3537 Fax: (573) 222-2685 St. Louis Job Corps Center 4333 Goodfellow Boulevard St. Louis, MO 6312 Tel: (314) 679-6200 Fax: (314) 383-5717 Top
Montana
Anaconda Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center 1407 Foster Creek Road Anaconda, MT 59711 Tel: (406) 563-8700 Fax: (406) 563-8243 Kicking Horse Job Corps Center 33091 Mollman Pass Trail Ronan, MT 59864 Tel: (406) 644-2217 Fax: (406) 644-2343 Trapper Creek Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center 5139 West Fork Road Darby, MT 59829-5139 Tel: (406) 821-3286 Fax: (406) 821-3290 Top
Nebraska
Pine Ridge Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center 15710 Highway 385 Chadron, NE 69337 Tel: (308) 432-3316 Fax: (308) 432-8695 Top
Nevada
Sierra Nevada Job Corps Center 14175 Mt. Charleston Street Reno, NV 89506 Tel: (775) 789-1000 Fax: (775) 789-1098 Top
New Jersey
Edison Job Corps Center 500 Plainfield Avenue Edison, NJ 08817-2587 Tel: (732) 985-4800 Fax: (732) 985-8551 Top
New Mexico
Albuquerque Job Corps Center 1500 Indian School Road N.W. Albuquerque, NM 87104 Tel: (505) 222-4243 Fax: (505) 346-2769 Roswell Job Corps Center PO Box 5970 57 G Street Roswell, NM 88202-5970 Tel: (575) 347-5414 Fax: (575) 347-2243 Top
New York
Brooklyn Job Corps Center 585 DeKalb Avenue Brooklyn, NY 11205 Tel: (718) 623-4000 Fax: (718) 623-9626 Co-Op Tech The School of Cooperative Technical Education, or Co Op Tech, offers 17 different certification courses in a variety of careers from culinary arts to computer networking. The program has a half-day model where students can attend their DOE high school or GED program for half a day and attend Co Op Tech for the other half of the day. Locations in Manhattan, The Bronx, Brooklyn and Staten Island. Vocational Foundation, Inc. 52 Broadway, 6th Floor, Manhattan Started 1936, this foundation trains young adults for career preparation (Men and Women ages 17-20; Young Fathers ages 22-30). Offering free job training in New York City, career counseling, job placement and work retention services. Passionate staff that cares about students in the long term and help with career advancement programs. Located in the heart of the financial district. Cassadaga Job Corps Center 8115 Glasgow Road Cassadaga, NY 14718-9606 Tel: (716) 595-8760 Fax: (716) 595-4396 Delaware Valley Job Corps Center PO Box 846 9368 State Route 97 Callicoon, NY 12723 Tel: (845) 887-5400 Fax: (845) 887-4762 Glenmont Job Corps Center PO Box 993 822 River Road Glenmont, NY 12077-0993 Tel: (518) 767-9371 Fax: (518) 767-2106 Iroquois Job Corps Center 11780 Tibbets Road Medina, NY 14103 Tel: (585) 798-7000 Fax: (585) 798-7046 Oneonta Job Corps Center 21 Homer Folks Avenue Oneonta, NY 13820 Tel: (607) 433-2111 Fax: (607) 431-1518 South Bronx Job Corps Center 1771 Andrews Avenue Bronx, NY 10453-6803 Tel: (718) 731-7700 Fax: (718) 731-3543 Top
North Carolina
Kittrell Job Corps Center PO Box 278 1096 U.S. Highway 1 South Kittrell, NC 27544 Tel: (252) 438-6161 Fax: (252) 492-9630 Lyndon B. Johnson Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center 3170 Wayah Road Franklin, NC 28734 Tel: (828) 524-4446 Fax: (828) 369-7338 Oconaluftee Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center 502 Oconaluftee Job Corps Road Cherokee, NC 28719 Tel: (828) 497-5411 Fax: (828) 497-6539 Schenck Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center 98 Schenck Drive Pisgah Forest, NC 28768 Tel: (828) 862-6100 Fax: (828) 877-3028 Top
North Dakota
Quentin N. Burdick Job Corps Center 1500 University Avenue West Minot, ND 58703 Tel: (701) 857-9600 Fax: (701) 838-9979 Top
Ohio
Cincinnati Job Corps Center 1409 Western Avenue Cincinnati, OH 45214 Tel: (513) 651-2000 Fax: (513) 651-2004 Cleveland Job Corps Center 13421 Coit Road Cleveland, OH 44110 Tel: (216) 541-2500 Fax: (216) 541-7791 Dayton Job Corps Center 3849 Germantown Pike Dayton, OH 45417 Tel: (937) 268-6571 Fax: (937) 267-3822 Top
Oklahoma
Guthrie Job Corps Center 3106 W. University Guthrie, OK 73044 Tel: (405) 282-9930 Fax: (405) 282-9501 Talking Leaves Job Corps Center PO Box 1066 5700 Bald Hill Road Tahlequah, OK 74465 Tel: (918) 456-9959 Fax: (918) 207-3489 Treasure Lake Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center 1111 Indiahoma Road Indiahoma, OK 73552 Tel: (580) 246-3203 Fax: (580) 246-8222 Tulsa Job Corps Center 1133 N. Lewis Avenue Tulsa, OK 74110 Tel: (918) 585-9111 Fax: (918) 592-2430 Top
Oregon
Angell Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center 335 N.E. Blodgett Road Yachats, OR 97498 Tel: (541) 547-3137 Fax: (541) 547-5690 Partners in Vocational Opportunity Training (PIVOT) Job Corps Center 2701 N.W. Vaughn Street Suite 151 Portland, OR 97210 Tel: (503) 274-7343 Fax: (503) 223-5771 Springdale Job Corps Center 31224 E. Historic Columbia River Highway Troutdale, OR 97060 Tel: (503) 695-2245 Fax: (503) 695-2254 Timber Lake Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center 59868 East Highway 224 Estacada, OR 97023 Tel: (503) 834-2291 Fax: (503) 834-2333 Tongue Point Job Corps Center 37573 Old Highway 30 Astoria, OR 97103 Tel: (503) 325-2131 Fax: (503) 325-5375 Wolf Creek Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center 2010 Opportunity Lane Glide, OR 97443-9733 Tel: (800) 588-9003 Fax: (541) 496-8515 Top
Pennsylvania
Keystone Job Corps Center 235 W. Foothills Drive Drums, PA 18222-2410 Tel: (570) 788-1164 Fax: (570) 788-1119 Philadelphia Job Corps Center 2810 S. 20th Street, Bldg. 12 Philadelphia, PA 19145-5001 Tel: (267) 386-2888 Fax: (215) 334-3675 Pittsburgh Job Corps Center 7175 Highland Drive Pittsburgh, PA 15206 Tel: (412) 441-8700 Fax: (412) 441-1586 Red Rock Job Corps Center PO Box 218 Route 487 North Lopez, PA 18628 Tel: (570) 477-2221 Fax: (570) 477-3046 Top
Rhode Island
Exeter Job Corps Center 162 Main Street Exeter, RI 02822 Tel: (401) 268-6000 Fax: (401) 294-0471 NetWORKRI -East Providence Area Career and Technical Center – East Providence East Providence, RI – 02914 | (401) 435-7815 East Providence Area Career and Technical Center offers programs and services to those wishing to obtain their High School Diploma as well as learn technical and/or trade skills. Youth Build – Providence Providence, RI – 02909 (401) 273-7528 Youth Build Providence is a workforce development program offered to out-of-school youth ages 16 – 24 that qualify. Through this 10 month program participants gain the academic, job readiness, and occupational skills needed to transition into the construction industry and other high-growth, high-demand occupational sectors. Top
South Carolina
Bamberg Job Corps Center 19 Job Corps Avenue Bamberg, SC 29003 Tel: (803) 245-5101 Fax: (803) 245-5915 Top
South Dakota
Boxelder Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center PO Box 110 22023 Job Corps Place Nemo, SD 57759-0110 Tel: (605) 348-3636 Fax: (605) 578-1157 Top
Texas
David L. Carrasco Job Corps Center 11155 Gateway West El Paso, TX 79935 Tel: (915) 594-0022 Fax: (915) 591-0166 Gary Job Corps Center 2800 Airport Highway 21 PO Box 967 San Marcos, TX 78667 Tel: (512) 396-6652 Fax: (512) 396-6666 Laredo Job Corps Center 1701 Island Street PO Box 1819 Laredo, TX 78041 Tel: (956) 727-5147 Fax: (956) 727-1937 North Texas Job Corps Center 1701 N. Church Street McKinney, TX 75069 Tel: (972) 542-2623 Fax: (214) 547-7700 Top
Tennessee
Dr. Benjamin L. Hooks Job Corps Center 1555 McAlister Drive Memphis, TN 38116 Tel: (901) 396-2800 Fax: (901) 396-8712 Jacobs Creek Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center 984 Denton Valley Road Bristol, TN 37620-1430 Tel: (423) 878-4021 Fax: (423) 878-7034 Top
Utah
Clearfield Job Corps Center 20 West 1700 South PO Box 160070 Clearfield, UT 84016-0070 Tel: (801) 774-4000 Fax: (801) 416-4635 Weber Basin Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center 7400 S. Cornia Drive Ogden, UT 84405-9605 Tel: (801) 479-9806 Fax: (801) 476-5985 Top
Vermont
Northlands Job Corps Center 100A MacDonough Drive Vergennes, VT 05491 Tel: (802) 877-2922 Fax: (802) 877-039 Top
Virginia
Blue Ridge Job Corps Center 245 W. Main Street Marion, VA 24354 Tel: (276) 783-7221 Fax: (276) 783-1751 Flatwoods Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center 2803 Dungannon Road Coeburn, VA 24230-9740 Tel: (276) 395-3384 Fax: (276) 395-2043 Old Dominion Job Corps Center 1073 Father Judge Road Monroe, VA 24574 Tel: (434) 929-4081 Fax: (434) 929-0812 Top
Washington
Cascades Job Corps Center 7782 Northern State Road PO Box 819 Sedro-Woolley, WA 98284 Tel: (360) 854-3400 Fax: (360) 854-2227 Columbia Basin Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center 6739 24th Street, Bldg. 2402 Moses Lake, WA 98837-3246 Tel: (509) 762-5581 Fax: (509) 793-1758 Curlew Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center 3 Campus Street Curlew, WA 99118 Tel: (800) 513-4884 Fax: (509) 779-0718 Fort Simcoe Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center 40 Abella Lane White Swan, WA 98952 Tel: (509) 874-2244 Fax: (509) 874-2342 Top
Washington, DC
Potomac Job Corps Center No. 1 D.C. Village Lane, S.W. Washington, DC 20032-5206 Tel: (202) 574-5000 Fax: (202) 373-3181 Top
West Virginia
Charleston Job Corps Center 1000 Kennawa Drive Charleston, WV 25311 Tel: (304) 925-3200 Fax: (304) 925-7127 Harpers Ferry Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center 146 Buffalo Drive Harpers Ferry, WV 25425 Tel: (304) 728-5708 Fax: (304) 728-8200 Top
Wisconsin
Blackwell Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center 4155 County Highway H Laona, WI 54541-9293 Tel: (715) 674-2311 Fax: (715) 674-7640 Milwaukee Job Corps Center 6665 N. 60th Street Milwaukee, WI 53223 Tel: (414) 353-5914 Fax: (414) 353-5919 Top

YouthBuild USA Urban Strategies Youthbuild 294 Sumpter Street Brooklyn, NY 11233 (718) 919-3600 In YouthBuild programs, unemployed and undereducated young people ages 16-24 work toward their GED or high school diploma while learning job skills by building affordable housing for homeless and low-income people. Strong emphasis is placed on leadership development, community service, and the creation of a positive mini-community of adults and youth committed to success.

YouthBuild USA offers students and graduates opportunities for:  
  • Career and academic advancement
  • Leadership roles in the YouthBuild Alumni Association, YouthBuild National Leaders Council and other community development organizations that can have impact beyond their local communities
  • Civic engagement and community service
  • Asset building and financial management skills through IDA and asset trust programs
  • Networking through conferences and youth councils
  Find a YouthBuild USA location near you. For more information, call 617-623-9900.
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Job Corps ~ The nation’s largest and most comprehensive residential, education and job training program for at-risk youth, ages 16-24. Job Corps operates 118 primarily residential Job Corps centers located across the country and in Puerto Rico. For more information, call 1-800-733-JOBS. Job Corps is a free education and training program that helps young people learn a career, earn a high school diploma or GED, and find and keep a good job. For eligible young people at least 16 years of age that qualify as low income, Job Corps provides the all-around skills needed to succeed in a career and in life.

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Non-Traditional Employment for Women Nontraditional Employment for Women (NEW) prepares, trains, and places women in careers in the skilled construction, utility, and maintenance trades, helping women achieve economic independence and a secure future. These careers enable NEW graduates to provide a secure future for themselves and their families. Grace Institute Grace Institute provides tuition-free, practical job training program for women, valuable, up-to-date office, computer, and business skills along with career advice and job placement assistance. Assisting Working Women in Need Savannah, GA – 31402 (912) 659-0241 AWWIN Professional Development helps to provide assistance by offering an introduction to job readiness training and retention program. They also offer classes that include Resume Writing and Critique, Practice Interviews, Dressing for Success, Budgeting, Reading, Vocabulary Increase and many others. Women in Construction Program (WinC) Mississippi sponsors the Women in Construction Program teaching low-income women construction skills. WOW (Wider Opportunities for Women) WOW is based in Washington, DC and offers career development programs specifically for women. WOW has a national reach and has trained over 10,000 women during the past 40 years. Chicago Women In Trades (CWIT) cwitinfo@cwit2.org 773.376.1450 CWIT provides support, advocacy, and education to tradeswomen; works to increase training for women and girls to enter nontraditional jobs; provides technical assistance to employers, unions, and other tradeswomen groups.
Arkansas
Arkansas Human Development Corporation Little Rock, AR – 72201 (501) 374-1103 Arkansas Human Development Corporation offers economic development activities that include youth and adult entrepreneurship training, financial literacy, lender forums, and minority business development conferences Top
California
Center for Employment Training (408) 287-7924 One of the most successful training programs in the nation, Center for Employment Training offers job training programs, job placement and services which promote self-sufficiency. Proteus 1830 North Dinuba Boulevard Visalia, CA 93279 (559) 733-5423 Proteus provide education, job training, job placement, and other support services to underserved communities programs including Comprehensive Assessments, Career Planning, Job Readiness Training, On-the-Job Training, Youth Employment Services and Skill upgrading. Top
Colorado
Rocky Mountain Service, Employment, & Redevelopment Rocky Mountain Service, Employment, & Redevelopment offers programs and services such as vocational and on the job training to adult, youth, and dislocated workers in need of employment through the Workforce Investment Act. Top
Delaware
West End Neighborhood House (302) 658-4171 West End Neighborhood House is a WIA sponsored Community-Based Organization offering education and employment programs and services. Telamon Corporation Dover, DE – 19901 (302) 734-1903 Telamon (and Transition Resources Corporation) provides human services to people and communities in twelve states to improve the lives of those in need. They provide literacy and early childhood education, childcare, job training, emergency services, temporary or permanent housing opportunities, mortgage assistance and a number of others services. Goodwill Industries of Delaware (302) 761-4640 Goodwill Industries offers job training, services and programs including computer training, job readiness, job placement, transitional employment, adult basic education and GED classes to improve the job prospects and earning potential of community residents. Top
Florida
Goodwill Industries Big Bend – Tallahassee Career Training (850) 576-7145 Goodwill Industries offers job training, services and programs including computer training, job readiness, job placement, transitional employment, adult basic education and GED classes to improve the job prospects and earning potential of community residents. The Connections Job Development & Placement Program (727) 849-4724 The Connections Job Development & Placement Program provides computer training, one-on-one job advisement, resume review and preparation, job leads, and interview clothing. John H. Bridges Community Services Center – Apopka (407) 254-9449 Provides job search and job training services. RES BEAT CAP – Lauderhill (954) 497-1432 CAP is a targeted employment program for Broward County residents who have not been able to successfully achieve their career goals. They offer computer training and workplace skills. Top
Georgia
STAR Foundation – Southern Technological Advocacy Resources Foundation (912) 554-0540 STAR Foundation offers a program that provides training in computer literacy, life skills for professional and personal enrichment. Telamon Corporation Statesboro, GA – 30458 (912) 764-6169 Telamon (and Transition Resources Corporation) provides human services to people and communities in twelve states to improve the lives of those in need. They provide literacy and early childhood education, childcare, job training, emergency services, temporary or permanent housing opportunities, mortgage assistance and a number of others services. Workforce Investment Act – Columbus Technical College (706) 649-1856 Columbus Technical College offers WIA eligible programs. The Workforce Investment Act (WIA) Program provides classroom-occupational-skills training for adults and youth with limited financial resources. Georgia Fatherhood Program (404) 679-1654 Georgia’s Fatherhood Program is the largest state-operated fatherhood program in the country. Georgia Fatherhood Program offers Job training and employment assistance for non-custodial parents who cannot meet their obligations to support their children. Training involves technical training to learn a job skill and living skills. Goodwill Industries of North Georgia (404) 728-8600 Goodwill Industries offers job training, services and programs including computer training, job readiness, job placement, transitional employment, adult basic education and GED classes to improve the job prospects and earning potential of community residents. Top
Illinois
Center for Employment Training Chicago, IL – 60612 (773) 533-3140 One of the most successful training programs in the nation, Center for Employment Training offers job training programs, job placement and services which promote self-sufficiency. Cara – Chicago (312) 798-3309 Cara offers has programs and services that help to teach life skills and employment training and placement. They also offer post-employment support for those who have completed the program. Bureau of Apprenticeship & Training (312) 793-6853 Bureau of Apprenticeship & Training provides information on setting up apprenticeship programs, apprentice occupations, and on-the-job training Chicago Manufacturing Institute (773) 685-1010 Chicago Manufacturing Institute provides free services to low-income people who live in the City of Chicago. The programs include job training and placement for the industrial trades. Community Human Services (773) 271-2700 Community Human Services provides free services to low-income people who live in the City of Chicago. The agency provides training for office and technology skills. Erie Neighborhood House (312) 666-3430 Erie Neighborhood House provides free services to low-income people who live in Chicago. A leadership course for women is also offered. Ethiopian Community Association (773) 728-0303 The Ethiopian Community Association provides free services to low-income people who live in the City of Chicago. To qualify for the program, you must meet its income guidelines. Programs include employment training, job counseling, job placement, cultural adjustment counseling, and ESL classes. There are also bilingual programs with African languages. To find out more about the programs, you may call the agency directly. Hull House Association (312) 906-8600 Hull House Association provides services to low-income people who live in the City of Chicago. The programs include vocational classroom training to teach you how to be an auto mechanic. Illinois Department of Employment Security (312) 793-5700 The local offices of the Illinois Department of Employment Security have “Apprenticeship Information Centers,” which provide information on apprenticeship programs including carpentry, roofing, or painting, etc. apprenticeships. Jane Addams Resource Corporation (773) 728-9769 Jane Addams Resource Corporation provides free services for low-income communities. The program includes a GED preparatory class and a literacy program. Kenwood-Oakland Community Organization (773) 548-7500 The Kenwood-Oakland Community Organization provides free services to the low-income population of Chicago. The programs include job training for a variety of fields such as administrative, construction, outreach, senior citizen health care, maintenance, and clerical work. Classes for GED, job readiness, and job training are also provided. Midwest Assoc. for Commercial & industrial Development (708) 547-1717 The Midwest Association for Commercial and Industrial Development provides free services and programs including on-the-job training and vocational classroom training for medical terminology, conversational Spanish, and computer skills on Word Perfect, Lotus, and Windows. Strive: Chicago Employment Services Southside office: (773) 624-9700 Westside office: (773) 645-7300 Strive provides free services including job training and placement. Urban League Employment & Counseling (312) 692-0766 The Urban League free offers employment training and job placement. Young adults may enroll in a 10-week job-readiness training program at the “Young Parents Center.” Westside Holistic Family Services (773) 921-8777 Westside Holistic Family Services provides free services and programs including basic skills training, job readiness training, job training in a number of fields, on-the-job training, and job placement. Top
Indiana
Adult Education – White County Learning Lab (219) 253-6100 White County Learning Lab offers Adult Basic Education classes that include basic skills including Math, computer skills, vocational skills and GED Preparation or Refresher Courses. Top
Kansas
UMOS – Bonner Springs (913) 522-7188 UMOS offers employment and training services and provides programs and services such as Assessment, Training, Job Search, Support and Retention Services. Top
Kentucky
Center for Employment Training – Lexington (859) 272-5225 One of the most successful training programs in the nation, Center for Employment Training offers job training programs, job placement and services which promote self-sufficiency. Office and Employment Training Winchester (859) 737-7793 Training, adult education, employment services and vocational rehabilitation provided by the Office of Employment and Training or its partners in comprehensive centers. Murray Discovery Center (270) 761-3903 Murray Discovery Center provides WIA Services including training, adult education, employment services and vocational rehabilitation provided by the Office of Employment and Training or its partners in comprehensive centers. Campbellsville Career Center (270)-465-2335 Campbellsville Career Center provides WIA Services including training, adult education, employment services and vocational rehabilitation that are provided by the Office of Employment and Training or its partners in comprehensive centers. Breathitt Career Center (270) 889-6509 Breathitt Career Center provides WIA Services including training, adult education, employment services and vocational rehabilitation that are provided by the Office of Employment and Training or its partners in comprehensive centers. Paducah Career Center (270) 575-7000 Paducah Career Center provides WIA Services including training, adult education, employment services and vocational rehabilitation that are provided by the Office of Employment and Training or its partners in comprehensive centers. Central Kentucky Job Center (502) 863-2402 Central Kentucky Job Center provides WIA Services including training, adult education, employment services and vocational rehabilitation that are provided by the Office of Employment and Training or its partners in comprehensive centers. Glasgow Area Career Center (270) 651-212 Center provides WIA Services including training, adult education, employment services and vocational rehabilitation that are provided by the Office of Employment and Training or its partners in comprehensive centers. Bowling Green Career Center (270) 746-7425 Center provides WIA Services including training, adult education, employment services and vocational rehabilitation that are provided by the Office of Employment and Training or its partners in comprehensive centers. Office of Employment and Training Office of Employment and Training offers access to employment openings, unemployment filing information and WIA approved Training opportunities for those that qualify. Top
Louisiana
Motivation Education and Training Inc Motivation Education and Training Inc. offers programs and services that are designed to provide academic and vocational training to disadvantaged populations throughout the agency’s service area. Top
Maryland
Telamon Corporation – Salisbury (410) 546-4604 Telamon (and Transition Resources Corporation) provides human services to people and communities in twelve states to improve the lives of those in need. They provide literacy and early childhood education, childcare, job training, emergency services, temporary or permanent housing opportunities, mortgage assistance and a number of others services. Top
Michigan
Telamon Corporation – Lansing (517) 323-7002 Telamon (and Transition Resources Corporation) provides human services to people and communities in twelve states to improve the lives of those in need. They provide literacy and early childhood education, childcare, job training, emergency services, temporary or permanent housing opportunities, mortgage assistance and a number of others services. Telamon Corporation – Traverse City (231) 941-5300 Telamon (and Transition Resources Corporation) provides human services to people and communities in twelve states to improve the lives of those in need. They provide literacy and early childhood education, childcare, job training, emergency services, temporary or permanent housing opportunities, mortgage assistance and a number of others services. Top
Minnesota
UMOS – Wilmar Heritage Square (320)214-7759 UMOS offers employment and training services and provides programs and services such as Assessment, Training, Job Search, Support and Retention Services. Motivation Education and Training – Wilmar (320)214-7172 Motivation Education and Training Inc. offers programs and services that are designed to provide academic and vocational training to disadvantaged populations throughout the agency’s service area. Top
Missouri
UMOS (417) 861-7984 UMOS offers employment and training services and provides programs and services such as Assessment, Training, Job Search, Support and Retention Services. Missouri Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (660) 785-2550 Missouri Division of Vocational Rehabilitation specializes in employment and training services that can assist participants in becoming employed. MERS Goodwill (573) 339-0071 MERS Goodwill offers a variety of programs and services such as Employment Services, Career Counseling and Skills Training. Top
New Jersey
Center for Employment Training – Newark (973) 824-6484 One of the most successful training programs in the nation, Center for Employment Training offers job training programs, job placement and services which promote self-sufficiency. Top
New York
Fifth Avenue Committee FAC provides Brooklyn underserved residents with training, job placement and services. Brooklyn Workforce Innovations Brooklyn Workforce Innovations identifies sectors of the economy that offer good starting wages to skilled entry-level workers, and opportunities to advance over time and offer to low income communities free full-time training leading to industry-recognized credentials, followed by two years of job placement and career services. The “Made in NY” Production Assistant Training Program Provides unemployed and low-income New York City residents with training and placement into entry-level positions in film and television production. NY Apprenticeship Programs The State of New York offers Apprenticeship programs where New Yorkers can get paid to learn. To become an Apprentice you select a trade and get matched with a business then become part of their workforce and receive wages, while learning new skills to become certified in your field. Consortium for Worker Education 275 Seventh Ave., 18th Floor, Manhattan The Consortium for Worker Education is a non-profit group providing over 60,000 New Yorkers with free education and job training programs to further their possible career opportunities. The Consortium offers a variety of NYC job training programs, from Basic Education, Computer Literacy, and Building Trades to English as a Second Language. The group also runs a full training center in Long Island City, Queens that offers Culinary and Artisan baking classes. The State University of New York – Bronx Educational Opportunity Center 1666 Bathgate, between 172nd and 173rd Streets This center is one of 10 in the state providing tuition-free job training to underprivileged New Yorkers including Occupational/Technical Prep, College Prep/GED and Basic Education. Office of Adult & Continuing Education (OACE) – Career and Technical Education (CTE) Offering over 900 classes for adults age 21 and over. There are four Adult Learning Centers located in Brooklyn, Manhattan, Queens, and the Bronx. OACE offers CTE courses which will provide adults with an opportunity to acquire technical, trade, construction or entrepreneurial skills enabling them to pursue meaningful employment and/or post-secondary education. CTE classes include courses such as basic Computer Literacy, Microsoft Certification, Web Page Design, Certified Nurse Assistant, Practical Nursing, Culinary/Food Preparation, Internet & Computer Core Certification (IC3), Electrical Installation, Carpentry, Welding and Plumbing. Many of the courses prepare students for industry recognized certifications and city and state licenses.
Headquarters/Central Office
OACE Central Office Brooklyn Adult Learning Center 475 Nostrand Avenue, Room 105 Brooklyn, NY 11216 718-638-2635 oace@schools.nyc.gov
Bronx
Bronx Adult Learning Center 3450 East Tremont Avenue Bronx, NY 10465, Room 323 718-863-4057 Locations In: Bedford Park, Castle Hill, Fordham, Hunts Point, Morrisania, Mott Haven, Norwood, Parkchester, Throgs Neck, Wakefield, West Bronx, West Farms
Brooklyn
@ P.S. 13 557 Pennsylvania Avenue Brooklyn, NY 11207, Room 251 718-240-2770 Locations In: Bay Ridge, Bensonhurst, Borough Park, Canarsie, Coney Island, Crown Heights, East Flatbush, East New York, Flatbush, Midwood, Ocean Hill- Brownsville, Sheepshead Bay, Sunset Park 850 Kent Avenue, 5th Floor Brooklyn, NY 11205 718-789-2223 Locations In: Bedford-Stuyvesant, Bushwick, Clinton Hill, Crown Heights, East New York, Flatbush, Fort Greene, Greenpoint, Prospect Heights, Ridgewood, Williamsburg Brooklyn Adult Learning Center 475 Nostrand Avenue Brooklyn, NY 11216 718-638-2635 SERVING: Bedford-Stuyvesant and Staten Island
Manhattan
Alternative Education Complex 500 8th Avenue, (35th street) New York, NY 10018, 7th Floor 212-868-1650 Manhattan, below 119th Street Mid-Manhattan Adult Learning Center 212 W 120th Street New York, NY 10027 212-666-1919, 1920 Manhattan, 119th Street and above
Queens
Queens Adult Learning Center 42-15 Crescent Street Long Island City, NY 11101 7th Floor 718-361-9480 Locations In: Astoria, College Point, Corona, Elmhurst, Flushing, Fresh Meadows, Jackson Heights, Kew Gardens, Long Island City, Maspeth, Ridgewood, Sunnyside, Woodside Educational Services 90-01 Sutphin Boulevard Jamaica, NY 11435 718-557-2567 Locations In: Bellerose, Briarwood, Far Rockaway, Glendale, Hollis, Jamaica, Kew Gardens, Laurelton, Ozone Park, Queens Village, Richmond Hill, Ridgewood, Rochdale Village, Rockaway, Rosedale, South Jamaica, South Ozone Park, St. Albans Access for Women – New York City College of Technology 300 Jay Street, H-407 Brooklyn, NY 11201 718-552-1131 Brooklyn Workforce 1 Career Center 9 Bond Street 5th Floor Brooklyn, NY 11201 718-246-5219 Career & Educational Consultants CEC- – Brooklyn 270 Flatbush Avenue Extension 3rd Floor Brooklyn, NY 11201 718-858-8500 x17 Consortium for Worker Education 275 7th Avenue 18th Floor New York, NY 10001 212-647-1900 Crown Heights Service Center 1193 Dean Street Brooklyn, NY 11216 718-774-9800 Crown Heights Youth Collective 915 Franklin Avenue Brooklyn, NY 11216 718-756-7600 NYC Workforce1 Career Center – Bronx 358 East 149th Street 2nd Floor Bronx, NY 10455 718-960-7901 NYC Workforce1 Career Center – Upper Manhattan 215 West 125th Street, 6th Floor New York, NY 10027 917-493-7000 Queens Workforce1 Career Center 168-25 Jamaica Avenue 2nd Floor Jamaica, NY 11432 718-557-6755 Queens Adult Learning Center 42-15 Crescent Street, 7th Floor Long Island City, NY 11101 718-361-9480 Queens Adult Learning Center – Jamaica 90-01 Sutphin Boulevard Jamaica, NY 11435 718-557-2567 Staten Island Workforce1 Career Center 60 Bay Street Staten Island, NY 10301 718-285-8388 FEGS – Bronx 412 E 147th Street Bronx, NY 10455 212-366-8539 HR Dynamics FEGS – Brooklyn 199 Jay Street Brooklyn, NY 11201 718-488-0100 CUNY CareerPATH at Kingsborough Community College CUNY CareerPATH at Kingsborough CUNY Career PATH was designed to serve unemployed adults who need training and increased academic skill levels in order to get a job and/or enroll in college and provides career and college-focused occupational training, with integrated math skills instruction in Culinary Arts, Food and Beverage Service/Hospitality, and Community Health. Top
North Carolina
Telamon Corporation – Raleigh (919) 851-7611 Telamon (and Transition Resources Corporation) provides human services to people and communities in twelve states to improve the lives of those in need. They provide literacy and early childhood education, childcare, job training, emergency services, temporary or permanent housing opportunities, mortgage assistance and a number of others services. The Occupational Skills Training – Goodwill Industries – Charlotte (704) 332-0303 Goodwill Industries offers job training, services and programs including computer training, job readiness, job placement, transitional employment, adult basic education and GED classes to improve the job prospects and earning potential of community residents. Jacob’s Ladder – Charlotte (704) 332-5822 Jacob’s Ladder strives to help disadvantaged individuals obtain and sustain living wage jobs with services including interview skills, job search strategies, and coaching on appropriate business dress and etiquette. Center for Employment Training – Durham (919) 686-4050 One of the most successful training programs in the nation, Center for Employment Training offers job training programs, job placement and services which promote self-sufficiency. Ada Jenkins Center – Life Compass Program – Davidson (704) 896-0471 Ada Jenkins Center – Life Compass Program provides help with job skills and searches to residents of Davidson, Huntersville or Cornelius. Top
Ohio
The Work Station – Center for Human Resource Development (740) 797-1405 The Work Station offers free employment, training and support services for businesses, job seekers and the community. Information and services are available to those seeking employment at this location. Assistance with WIA programs and services is available to those that qualify. Top
Pennsylvania
PathStone Corporation (610) 925-5600 PathStone Corporation offers Training and Employment Services to persons to the disadvantaged. Job Training for Beaver County (724) 728-2020 Job Training for Beaver County offers programs and services such as On the Job Training and Job Search Assistance. Future Media Concepts (215) 922-2500 Future Media Concepts is a WIA sponsored program providing training in digital media. Center for Employment Training – University Community Homes (215) 546-1880 One of the most successful training programs in the nation, Center for Employment Training offers job training programs, job placement and services which promote self-sufficiency. Top
Rhode Island
Dorcas Place Adult and Family Learning Center – Providence (401) 273-8866 Dorcas Place Adult and Family Learning Center offers low-income Rhode Islanders services through programs and services such as workplace training, college preparatory programs, and employment. Rhode Island College – Office of Outreach Programs (401) 456-8698 Rhode Island College – Office of Outreach Programs offers training programs in areas such as Medical Assistants, Bookkeeper and Accountant Clerks and Insurance Technicians. Top
Texas
Quest Center – San Antonio (210) 630-4633 Project QUEST offers a variety of programs and services to economically disadvantaged adults in including training in industries such as Healthcare, Information Technology and Business Services and Installation. Occupational Classroom Skills Training – Bexar County Opportunities Industrialization Center (210) 333-8389 Occupational Classroom Skills Training provides training such as Computer Operations Programs and word processing, specialized training in Microsoft Office and Windows Operating Systems. National Center of Continuing Education – Lakeway (800) 824-1254 National Center of Continuing Education is a WIA sponsored Public Community/Technical School/College. Motivation Education and Training – El Paso (915)598-9132 Motivation Education and Training Inc. offers programs and services that are designed to provide academic and vocational training to disadvantaged populations throughout the agency’s service area. The Good Careers Academy – San Antonio (210) 924-8581 The Good Careers Academy strives to provide training, education, and employment opportunities to the disadvantaged. Center for Employment Training – El Paso (915) 859-1070 One of the most successful training programs in the nation, Center for Employment Training offers job training programs, job placement and services which promote self-sufficiency. Christian Women’s Job Corps – San Antonio (210) 923-6185 Christian Women’s Job Corps offers no cost programs to help with job readiness and life skills. Participants are matched with a mentor to help them as they progress through the program. Top
Tennessee
Telamon Corporation – Unicoi (423) 743-2028 Telamon (and Transition Resources Corporation) provides human services to people and communities in twelve states to improve the lives of those in need. They provide literacy and early childhood education, childcare, job training, emergency services, temporary or permanent housing opportunities, mortgage assistance and a number of others services. Top
Virginia
Telamon Corporation – Gretna (434) 656-8357 Telamon (and Transition Resources Corporation) provides human services to people and communities in twelve states to improve the lives of those in need. They provide literacy and early childhood education, childcare, job training, emergency services, temporary or permanent housing opportunities, mortgage assistance and a number of others services. Center for Employment Training – Lynchburg (434) 846-2778 One of the most successful training programs in the nation, Center for Employment Training offers job training programs, job placement and services which promote self-sufficiency. Top
Washington
Opportunities Industrialization Center – Yakima (509) 248-6751 Opportunities Industrialization Center offers education and training program to help participants attain self-sufficiency and upgrade occupational skills, giving them real experiences on a work site. Top
Washington, DC
Center for Employment Training (202) 583-4655 One of the most successful training programs in the nation, Center for Employment Training offers job training programs, job placement and services which promote self-sufficiency. Top
West Virginia
Workforce West Virginia – Charleston (304) 558-0342 Workforce West Virginia – Job Seeker Services provides referrals to job opportunities, career counseling, resume services, training/education resources and funding. Top
Wisconsin
UMOS – Milwaukee (414) 389-6000 UMOS offers employment and training services and provides programs and services such as Assessment, Training, Job Search, Support and Retention Services. Multi-Cultural Community Services 414-527-1010 A non-profit community agency since 1972 providing, GED, HSED, Job Training, employment and child care. Top
Use these interview tips for job hunting success! It’s a tough job market out there today. And getting the job you want requires more than just a killer resume. In other words, you can’t just sell yourself on paper. You also have to be able to do it in person–in a face-to-face job interview. Here are a few interview tips to help you make a great impression on the person who interviews you. 1. Market your skills and related experience in the field that you are applying for. Be sure to do it in a way that is positive, but not cocky or aggressive. 2. Research the company before your interview. It’s a great way to know where you would fit into the organization. It also lets the employer know that you really want to be a part of the company. 3. Prepare answers to common interview questions ahead of time, and practice saying them, so you aren’t stumped during the interview. 4. Dress for success, in the manner you would dress for the position you’re seeking. 5. Bring a list of your own questions with you in a folder with the company’s name on it, so that you don’t forget them. You should keep your extra resumes in there too. 6. Be a good listener and focus. Some job seekers talk too much during interviews. 7. Be prepared to describe your weaknesses as strengths. For example, saying that you are overenthusiastic about performing at your best. 8. Make eye contact with your interviewer. 9. Don’t volunteer your personal opinions to your interviewer about any subjects unless you are asked. 10. Try to establish a good rapport with your interviewer. Be casual but professional, and most importantly BE YOURSELF! Take the time to implement these interview tips before your next job hunt. It’ll give you a leg up on your competition! Kathi MacNaughton, a freelance writer and editor, has years of management and recruitment experience. For tips & advice on writing powerful resumes, see http://www.powerful-sample-resume-formats.com. Copyright 2004 Kathi MacNaughton. All rights reserved. article source: adzines.com
Take a moment to step outside yourself. Now, be honest with me here? If you could be your own boss, how would you rate your own performance in the last three months? Would you get a raise, a day off as a treat, or would a big and brawny security guy kindly escort you to the parking lot? In order to be an effective marketer and a progressive human being for that matter, you have to take a breather and look in the mirror. What are you doing that’s working and what can you do to improve? See what it is you are actually doing in all your busy days running from meeting to meeting, answering calls, or a zillion emails. Are you remembering your goals or your MISSION? Have you sat down and actually taken the time to write out your goals and your mission? I read somewhere once that you should give yourself a “Company Evaluation” every month to make note of your progress and see where you still need to tighten up your act. I made a similar format to the evaluation form used at one of my past jobs. I tried it on myself for a few months and it really helps you re-focus and remember what your overall VISION was in the first place. It also brings your strengths and weaknesses to the forefront! Try it out and rate yourself at the end of the month to see how you did. Here’s an example of how to do it. List your responsibilities and objectives and rate each one. 1 being the worst and 5 being the best: Evaluation of The Sweet Tooth (Pastry company):
  • Make an income of $3,000+ with orders for June: 2
  • Develop a buzz about my company: 4
  •  Increase catering for events to at least 5 parties per month: 4
  • Improve time management: 1
  • Manage and build an effective team: 5
Pros: I did great with developing buzz, because of the press I received in the Daily News. Giving the editor free pies worked! Cons: I was late for two important meetings, because of poor time management. I like to write out the pros and cons of the overall performance as well. What did you do exceptionally well and why? What are the steps needed to make next month’s evaluation better? When you elaborate on your highs and lows? You can be your own coach to some extent. You can then set goals to make improvements instead of floating through each month with no direction. Having this on paper might help stop you from repeating the same destructive patterns. You might even want to get a folder or binder to keep them all in, so you can note your progress. Break It Down: _ Review your schedule a week in advance. (Sounds easy enough, but most of us rarely do this–even with Mr. Palm Pilot in our lives) _ Break up big projects up into baby steps. _ Delegate, Delegate, DELEGATE! There is always someone who can help you. Just master the art of picking the RIGHT person for the task. _ Set deadlines for every task, no matter how small. Okay? I’ll admit that I’m good for thinking something is a very small project and “a piece a cake”, until 10 of those small pieces of cake pile up and make a big mess! So, set a deadline for the small project and get it outta the way! _ Know your best times of day to work. (Are you a morning person or do you like burning the midnight oil?) _ AND my favorite that I’m just getting the hang of: LEARN HOW TO SAY NO! You can’t please everybody. Alright now? Go shine up that mirror, take a nice long look, and let me know if you see the same reflection next month. Hopefully, you’ll see someone on a whole other level! I’ll be waiting to hear from ya… Simone Kelly is author and founder of Gots To Have It, Marketing, a firm that specializes in marketing and empowering entrepreneurs with a series of workshops and networking events. Please view her company web sites here: http://www.gotstohaveit.com and http://www.giventakenetwork.org article source: adzines.com
Are you unhappy at work? Tired and lacking energy and drive? Don’t worry, you are not alone! Studies in the US show that up to 70 percent of the workforce is unhappy with their job at any given time. We all feel dissatisfied and frustrated with our jobs at times. So, how do you know when the feeling of dissatisfaction and frustration means it is time for a career change? There are a few key signs which point towards a need for change: * feeling overwhelmed by your workload * unable to balance your work and life responsibilities * confused about roles and duties in your job * easily irritated and ready to explode at the slightest provocation We choose our career path for many different reasons: because of our parents’ encouragement; because it is a successful occupation; or for the financial reward (to name just a few). However, you may be in a career that doesn’t support your core values. This could be the root of your discomfort. Take a personal and professional inventory. Ask yourself some important questions. 1. Look at your current job. How did you get there? 2. What are your personal attributes (artistic, adaptable, creative, leader, etc.)? 3. What are your core values (autonomy, growth, helping others, financial security etc.)? 4. What are your greatest strengths? 5. Identify your accomplishments. 6. Identify your career satisfiers and dissatisfiers: For each position you have had throughout your career what activities or responsibilities did you enjoy (and not enjoy) doing? 7. What is important to you, personally and professionally? 8. What you would like to do or accomplish during your lifetime (personally or professionally) so that you will consider your life to have been well-lived? 9. What are you most excited about now? Take a look at your answers. Is your present career in line with who you are, what you value, and what you are good at? If not, then it is time to make a change. Once you have established that you are ready for a career change, start thinking about and noticing what you want. If you could do anything, what would you do? By assessing your accomplishments, skills, strengths and weakness you will be able to see a link between what it is that you value, what you are good at, and where the “juice” is for you – all things that you can turn into a new career. Decide what you want and create your opportunities. MAKE A PLAN. Then, use this plan to switch from resentment in your current job to looking at the positives you can take to your new career. What are your transferable skills? What are you learning in your present position that you can take with you? Once you have a plan, stay focused on your intention, and pay attention to opportunities that present themselves. Despite your present frustration and your excitement at the possibilities ahead of you, it is natural to feel afraid about starting a new career. Feel the fear and do it anyway! Remember, the power to do so is within you. Copyright Cecile Peterkin Cecile Peterkin is a Certified Career Coach, Retirement Coach and Speaker. With over 17 years of managerial, leadership, empowerment counseling and personal development experience, Cecile specializes in helping Middle Managers overcome the “Middle Syndrome” of being stuck in a middle position in mid-life. To learn more about Cecile, visit her website at http://www.cosmiccoachingcentre.com or call 416-782-5001, Toll-free:1-866-486-4112. article source: adzines.com
If you are working for someone else, it is important to remember this fact: No one gives you a raise, you must earn it. You’ve got to prove you are worth the additional money you are asking for. And, you must do this in a professional, business-like, and diplomatic way. You do this by completing salary research and having the facts straight in terms of your worth and the additional value you bring to the table. This may mean that you are not ready to ask for a raise tomorrow. But, taking the extra time, preparation, and effort necessary to ensure that you are eligible for a raise is really the only way you are going to get one. Also, when asking for a raise, it is best to stick to business, rather than personal, reasons. It is not fair to your employer to ask for a raise “because Sally needs new braces” or “because you need to pay for Billy’s trip to Europe next summer.” Stick to the business facts of why you deserve the raise. Following is an effective three-step process to getting the raise you deserve. Step 1: Do your homework The surest way to not get a raise is to throw out some arbitrary or random number to the decision maker. You’ll be better off to do some research on what the industry standard of pay is for your position. There are many salary calculators and web sites online such as the salary wizards at HotJobs.com, Monster.com, or Salary.com. Keep in mind, such calculators provide industry averages and may not be adjusted for the cost of living in your particular part of the country. The average salary for an accounting clerk in New York City, New York is going to be slightly higher than for the same position in Deer Lodge, Montana. Check with your company’s compensation department on what the exact salary range is for your position. Most companies are obligated to provide this information to you on a confidential basis. With both of these pieces of data, the industry standard pay range and your company’s specific pay range; you are now armed with fact-based information to proceed with your strategy. Step 2: Review your past performance appraisals Be realistic. In looking over your past performance, do you really merit a raise? Have you exceeded expectations on the job or merely met them? What, if anything, have you done to set yourself apart from the other people in your department? If you have been a constant top achiever and star performer, then by all means proceed directly to Step 3 and set up a meeting with your boss and ask for the raise. However, if your performance has been less than stellar, do the following before asking for the raise. a) Develop a great track record at work. For the next three months, put in as much extra effort as possible. Come in a little early, stay a little late. Cut your lunch hour by 15 minutes. Take on extra assignments. Do your absolute best. b) Meet with your boss. Let your boss know that you like your job but you are interested to know what you can do to earn more money. Modify your current performance plan (or create a new one) to document exactly what you need to do to earn a raise. Also set and document a time when the future review date and meeting will occur. c) Set goals and expectations. Make a plan for doing what your boss said was needed to make more money. Then do it. d) Document everything. Keep a record of your meetings with your boss – when you met, what you discussed, what you agreed on, etc. e) Record your accomplishments. As you meet (or exceed!) each goal, keep a record of specific activities such as the date you completed the goal, the steps you took to accomplish the goal, concrete dollar or time savings and increases in efficiency, etc. Step 3: Set up a review meeting with your boss Once you have successfully met each goal and expectation, meet with your boss again. Review what you agreed on, how you have successfully accomplished each goal, and determine exactly what the next steps will be to move you forward and to make more money. It is important to remember that no one owes you a pay raise or gives you a pay raise – you must earn a pay raise. By being professional, reasonable and fair; you will stand a much better chance in obtaining the pay raise you deserve. Dr. Dan Strakal has been an expert on the changing workplace, job transition, and career development for nearly 20 years. He acts as a trusted client advisor and consultant within the corporate sector, government agencies, civic organizations, small businesses, and educational institutions. He also provides business, executive and career consulting, coaching and workshops for individual clients and is the coauthor of and contributor to two books, Better Job Search in 3 Easy Steps and Better Job Skills in 3 Easy Steps. Dan is often called upon by the national and international media as an expert and has appeared in The Wall Street Journal, Self Magazine, SmartMoney.com, Computerworld, Diversity Inc. Magazine, Chief Information Officer (Australia’s Magazine for Information Executives), the Radio America Program: News You Can Use, KBS Radio Canada and many other media outlets. He is on the Board of Directors of the Career Planning and Adult Development Network and is a Platinum Member of the Career Masters Institute. More info at http://www.capable-consulting.com article source: adzines.com
  1. Research the company Never go to a job interview without first checking out the company online. If you show up without any knowledge of the company you will look unprepared, lazy and uninterested in the company’s background.
  2. Be your own salesperson Don’t be afraid to blow your own horn. Let employers know that what you have going for you and what sets you apart.
  3. Make sure are prepared Get a good night’s sleep, have a god breakfast and show up for the interview 15-20 minutes early. Have a copy or two of your resume, a list of your references. At the interview be friendly, gracious and engaging to everyone you come in contact with. Make sure you demonstrate that you are eager for the position without coming across as desperate.
  4. Make it easy for the employer Make things crystal clear for the employer. Your experience, your value as an employee are for you to explain to them. Don’t expect them to know what is best for you.
  5. Know what you want Apply for a specific job. Don’t just search for a job without a specific goal in mind.
  6. Do your research Do some research, go online, ask around to find out how much you should earn for a particular job. This will help you when you’re working out your salary and benefits.
  7. Back up the info on your résumé If you can, get people who have thought highly of your job performance to put it in writing. This can give your resume extra credibility.
  8. Have an edge If you know someone at the company, get them to sing your praises. Use whatever advantage you can to set you apart from the pack.
  9. Make them want to hire you Send an enthusiastic thank you letter after the interview reiterating why you want the job and are the perfect person for the job. Make sure you send it within 2 days of the interview so you are fresh in the employer’s mind.
  10. Have a back-up plan Keep in the back of your mind that you may lose your job and prepare for that day. Keep your resume up to date and keep track of your accomplishments. If the time comes, you will be set up to get a job quickly if you’ve planned ahead.
  1. Start with an attractive layout It’s best to go with a simple, classic layout but use bullet points, italics and bold fonts to emphasize key points. To stand out from the pack, you could make your name much larger than the body of your resume. You can get a bit more creative. But, generally speaking going with the standard layout is the way to go.
  2. Keep the layout standard Don’t center the text or do anything that makes it hard to follow. The idea is to make an employer want to read your resume and not spend time trying to figure it out.
  3. Never send out a resume without a cover letter This is the general rule of thumb. Don’t send a generic letter. Get the name of the person who is in charge of hiring for that position. At the very least, address the cover letter to the Human Resources Manager
  4. Keep details consistent Don’t list September 2006 and then another date as 2/06. It looks careless.
  5. Don’t use an unprofessional email address If your email address is hotpants@aol.com, you may want to set up a different email account for professional use only. You can do this for free on yahoo.com, google.com, or hotmail.com. This takes just a few minutes and is well worth it. Most employers expect to see an email address on a resume. Make sure you include one along with the best number to reach you (preferably a cell phone number).
  6. Follow grammatical rules This should not be left to chance. The fastest way to get your resume in the garbage heap is to use bad grammar.
  7. Stick to traditional fonts Go with Arial, Times New Roman, Verdana, Georgia to be on the safe side. You don’t want to get experimental when it comes to your resume. Avoid graphics or anything distracting that can prevent your resume from being taken seriously.
  8. Use action verbs to emphasize your responsibilities It’s recommended that sentences start with a powerful action verb like: created, established, organized, implemented, etc. Start each sentence with a powerful verb.
  9. List only the year that you obtained your degree not dates of attendance When you list your dates of attendance, many résumé scanning systems will not recognize that you obtained a degree, only that you attended college for a period.
  10. Review a printed version of your resume over and over again. Check spelling and grammar to make sure there are no errors.

Employment Guide

Get That Job
  1. Research the company Never go to a job interview without first checking out the company online. If you show up without any knowledge of the company you will look unprepared, lazy and uninterested in the company’s background.
  2. Be your own salesperson Don’t be afraid to blow your own horn. Let employers know that what you have going for you and what sets you apart.
  3. Make sure are prepared Get a good night’s sleep, have a god breakfast and show up for the interview 15-20 minutes early. Have a copy or two of your resume, a list of your references. At the interview be friendly, gracious and engaging to everyone you come in contact with. Make sure you demonstrate that you are eager for the position without coming across as desperate.
  4. Make it easy for the employer Make things crystal clear for the employer. Your experience, your value as an employee are for you to explain to them. Don’t expect them to know what is best for you.
  5. Know what you want Apply for a specific job. Don’t just search for a job without a specific goal in mind.
  6. Know how much you want Do some research, go online, ask around to find out how much you should earn for a particular job. This will help you when you’re working out your salary and benefits.
  7. Back up the info on your résumé If you can, get people who have thought highly of your job performance to put it in writing. This can give your resume extra credibility.
  8. Have an edge If you know someone at the company, get them to sing your praises. Use whatever advantage you can to set you apart from the pack.
  9. Make them want to hire you Send an enthusiastic thank you letter after the interview reiterating why you want the job and are the perfect person for the job. Make sure you send it within 2 days of the interview so you are fresh in the employer’s mind.
  10. Have a back-up plan Keep in the back of your mind that you may lose your job and prepare for that day. Keep your resume up to date and keep track of your accomplishments. If the time comes, you will be set up to get a job quickly if you’ve planned ahead.
EVOLVAGE – MAGNET SCHOOLS MAGNET SCHOOLS Magnet schools are public high schools that attract the most talented students in a region using an application process that typically involves test scores and grade-point averages. The following are some of the nation’s best magnet schools. ALABAMA Loveless Academic Magnet Program High School Montgomery, AL ARIZONA Borton Primary Magnet School Tucson, Arizona (520) 225-1000 Safford Engineering/Technology Magnet Middle School Tuscon, AZ Utterback Magnet Middle School of the Arts Tucson, AZ (520) 225-3500 ARKANSAS Gardner Math/Science/Technology Magnet Hot Srings, AR Gibbs Magnet School of International Studies and Foreign Languages Little Rock, AR Langston Aerospace & Environmental Studies Magnet Hot Springs, AR Oaklawn Visual & Performing Arts Magnet School Hot Springs, AR CALIFORNIA Carver Academy Principal: Lynda Brown Cerritos, CA Fiesta Gardens International School Principal: Shelia Spieller San Mateo, CA Niemes Elementary School Artesia, CA North Shoreview Montessori Music and Art School San Mateo, CA Ross Academy of Creative Media Arts Artesia, CA San Mateo Park Math and Science Magnet School San Mateo, CA (650) 312-7577 U.B. Kinsey/Palmview Elementary School West Palm Beach, FL (561) 802-2145 Sunnybrae Primary Years Pre-Elementary School San Mateo, CA (650) 312-7599 CONNECTICUT Barnard Environmental Studies Magnet School New Haven, CT (203) 691-3500 Betsy Ross Arts Magnet School New Haven, CT King/Robinson Interdistrict Magnet School New Haven, CT Maloney Interdistrict Magnet School Waterbury, CT Metropolitan Learning Center Interdistrict Magnet School for Global & International Studies Bloomfield, CT Montessori Magnet School Hartford, CT Rotella Interdistrict Magnet School Waterbury, CT The Metropolitan Learning Center Bloomfield, CT University High School of Science & Engineering Hartford, CT Warterbury Arts Magnet School Waterbury, CT FLORIDA A.W. Dreyfoos School of the Arts West Palm Beach, FL Air Base Elementary School Homestead, FL Andrew J. Ferrell Middle School Tampa, FL Campbell Park Elementary for Marine Science St. Petersburg, FL Coral Gables Senior High School Coral Gables, FL Coral Reef Senior High School Miami, Florida (305) 232-2044 Crooms Academy of Information Technology Sanford, FL Crestview Elementary School Miami, FL Design and Architectural Senior High Miami, FL Douglas L. Jamerson, Jr. Elementary Center for Mathematics and Engineering St. Petersburg, FL Dowdell Middle Magnet Tampa, FL Driftwood Middle School Hollywood, FL (754) 323-3100 Dunbar High School Fort Myers, FL (239) 461-5322 Frank C. Martin IB K-8 Center Miami, FL Franklin Park Magnet School Fort Myers, Florida (239) 332-1969 G.W. Carver Middle School Miami, FL (305) 444-7388 Goldsboro Elementary Magnet Principal: Cheryl Nicholas Sanford, FL Herbert A. Ammons Middle School Miami, FL James B. Sanderlin Elementary School St. Petersburg, FL (727) 552-1700 John F. Kennedy Middle School Miami-Dade Public Schools Miami Beach, FL (305)947-1451 Lakewood Elementary School St. Petersburg, FL (727) 893-2196 Lee Elementary School of Technology and World Studies Tampa, FL (813) 276-5405 Lincoln Elementary Magnet School of Technology Plant City, FL (813) 757-9329 Lockhart Elementary Gifted and Talent Development Academy Tampa, FL (813) 276-5727 Lomax Elementary Magnet Tampa, FL (813) 276-5569 Macfarlane Park Magnet School for International Studies Tampa, FL (813) 356-1760 Maritime and Science Technology Academy Miami, FL Maximo Micromax Society & Visual Arts Elementary St. Petersburg, FL McNair Middle Magnet School Rockledge, FL Midway Elementary School Sanford, FL Morikami Park Elementary School Delray Beach, FL Muller Elementary Magnet Tampa, FL Nathan B. Young Middle Magnet School Tampa, FL (813) 276-5739 New World School of the Art Miami, FL Norland Middle Magnet Miami, FL North Dade Center for Modern Languages Miami Gardens, FL (305) 625 3885 Paxon School/Advanced Studies Jacksonville, FL Philip Shore Magnet School of the Arts Tampa, FL (813) 276-5712 Pine Forest School of the Arts Jacksonville, FL Pompano Beach High School Pompano, FL (754) 322-2000 Progress Village Middle Magnet School Tampa, FL (813) 671-5110 Rampello Downtown Partnership School Tampa, FL (813) 233-2333 Ronald McNair Magnet Middle School Rockledge, FL (321) 633-3630 Roosevelt Middle Magnet School West Palm Beach, FL Sawgrass Springs Middle School Coral Springs, FL S. D. Spady Montessori School Delray Beach, FL Sligh Middle School Health Explorations & Technology Magnet Tampa, FL Southwood Middle School Miami, FL Stanton College Preparatory Jacksonville, FL Stewart Middle Magnet School Tampa, FL (813) 276-5691 Suncoast Community High School Riviera Beach, FL (813) 744-8360 Sunset Elementary School Miami, FL Tampa Bay Technical School Tampa, FL S. D. Spady Montessori School Delray Beach, FL Williams IB Middle Magnet School Tampa, F GEORGIA Augustus R. Johnson Health Science & Engineering August, GA Butler Elementary School Savannah, GA Charles Ellis Montessori Academy Savannah, GA Columbus High School Columbus, GA Davidson Magnet School Augusta, GA John S. Davidson Fine Arts School Augusta, GA (706) 823-6924 Marshpoint Elementary School Savannah, GA (912) 898-4000 Thunderbolt Elementary School Thunderbolt, GA (912) 303-6655 ILLINOIS Agassiz Elementary School Chicago, IL Ariel Community Academy Chicago, IL Blain School Chicago, IL Northside College Preparatory High School Chicago, IL Payton College Preparatory High School Chicago, IL Walt Disney Magnet School Chicago, IL (773) 534-5840 LOUISIANA Benjamin Franklin Senior High School New Orleans, LA J.S. Clark Magnet School Monroe, LA McKinlev Middle Academic Magnet Baton Rouge, LA Peabody Montessori Alexandria, LA St. James Parish Magnet Program Vacherie, LA Westdale Heights Academic Magnet Elementary School Baton Rouge, LA MARYLAND Cromwell Valley Regional Magnet School of Technology Baltimore, MD (410) 887-4889 Lutherville Laboratory for Science, Mathematics, and Communications Lutherville, MD (410) 887-7800 MICHIGAN Pleasant View Magnet Elementary School Lansing, MI (517) 325-6859 Wainwright Leadership Academy Lansing, MI (517) 325-6877 Wexford Montessori Elementary School Lansing, MI (517) 325-6883 Woodcreek Elementary School Lansing, MI (517) 325-6890 MINNESOTA Birch Grove Elementary School for the Arts Brooklyn Park, MN (763) 561-1374 Fridley Middle School Fridley, MN (763) 502-5400 MISSISSIPPI Hayes Cooper Center Merigold, MS NEVADA Clark High School Teacher Education Academy Las Vegas, NV (702) 799-5800 Gilbert Magnet Elementary School North Las Vegas, NV (702) 799 – 4730 Jo Mackey Academy of Leadership and Global Communication North Las Vegas, NV (702) 799-7139 Mabel Hoggard Magnet School Las Vegas, NV (702) 799-4740 Roy W. Martin Middle School Las Vegas, NV Sandy Searles Miller Academy of International Studies Las Vegas, NV The Academy of Math, Science, and Technology at Bridger Middle School North Las Vegas, NV Walter Bracken Elementary School Las Vegas, NV NEW YORK City Honors School at Fosdick Masten Park Buffalo, NY Girls Preparatory Charter School 442 E. Houston St., 3rd Floor New York, NY 10002 Phone: 917.267.2756 P.S./I.S. 104: The Magnet School of Museum Studies Brooklyn, NY (718) 836-4630 Watson Williams Elementary School Utica, NY Yonkers High School Yonkers, NY NORTH CAROLINA A.B. Combs Leadership magnet Elementary School Raleigh, NC Brooks Museums Magnet Raleigh, NC Broughton High School Raleigh, NC Bugg Creative Arts & Science Elementary School Raleigh, NC Cenntenial Campus Middle School Raleigh, NC Charles R. Bugg Elementary School Raleigh, NC Clarkston School of Discovery Clarkston, NC Club Boulevard Humanities Magnet School Durham, NC (919) 560-2525 Collinswood Language Academy Charlotte, NC (980) 343-5820 East Millbrook Magnet Middle Raleigh, NC (919) 850-8755 Emma Conn Elementary School Raleigh, NC (919) 856-7637 Farmington Woods IB/PYP Magnet Elementary Cary, NC (919) 460-3469 Douglas Elementary Creative Arts and Science Magnet Schoo Raleigh, NC Durham School of the Arts Durham, NC (919) 560-3926 Fred J. Cranage GT Magnet Middle School Raleigh, NC Idlewild Elementary School Charlotte, NC (980) 343-6411 Ligon GT Magnet Middle School Raleigh, NC Paideia Academy at Oakhurst Charlotte, NC Paisley IB Magnet School Winston-Salem, NC Poe Montessori Magnet School Raleigh, NC Powell GT Magnet Elementary School Raleigh, NC R.N. Harris Integrated Arts/Core Knowledge Magnet Durham, NC (919) 560-3967 Smith Academy of International Languages Charlotte, NC (980) 343-5815 University Park Creative Arts Elementary Charlotte, NC (980) 343-5178 Washington GT Magnet Elementary Raleigh, NC PENNSYLVANIA Julia R. Masterman Secondary School Philadelphia, PA SOUTH CAROLINA Academic Magnet High School No. Charleston, SC TENNESSEE Arlington International Leadership School Jackson, TN Battle Academy Chattanooga, TN Chattanooga Center for Creative Arts Chattanooga, TN (423) 209-5929 Hume Fogg Magnet High School Nashville, TN Jackson Careers and Technology Magnet Jackson, TN (731) 427-4581 Martin Luther King Jr. Magnet – Pearl High School Nashville, TN Normal Park Musuem Magnet Chatanooga, TN TEXAS A.B. Anderson Academy Houston, TX Aldine Academy Houston, TX Austin Children’s Engineering Magnet School Wichita Falls, TX Bethune Academy Houston, TX Carroll Academy Houston, TX Carter Academy Houston, TX Carver Magnet High School Houston, TX Charles R. Drew Academy Middle School Houston, TX (281) 878-0360 Drew Academy Houston, TX Grantham Academy Middle School Houston, TX (281) 985-6590 Harris Academy Elementary School Houston, Texas (281) 878-7900 Hirschi Math-Science IB Magnet High School Wichita Falls, Texas (940) 716-2800 Huey Montessori Wichita Falls, TX Jewell Houston Academy Elementary School Houston, TX (281) 878-7745 JRuth Smith Academy Houston, TX Kirby Junior High Wichita Falls, TX Lamar Environmental Center Wichita Falls, TX Northwest EXCEL Academy Houston, TX (281) 878-7775 Raymond Academy for Engineering Houston, TX Reece Academy Houston, TX (281) 878-0800 Ruby Reed Academy Houston, TX Stovall Academy Elementary School Houston, TX (281) 591-8500 Versa V. Reece Montessori Academy Houston, TX William B. Travis Vanguard and Academy Dallas, TX (972) 794-7500 KIPP Schools KIPP Schools, a darling of the journalism world, have been lauded by such publications as the New York TimesWashington PostNewsweekUS News & World ReportThe Wall Street Journal, USA Today and Forbes. They’ve also been featured on “The Oprah Winfrey Show,” where Oprah called KIPP, “a revolutionary school system.” ARKANSAS KIPP Blytheville College Prep. School Blytheville, AR – Middle School KIPP Delta College Preparatory School Helena, AR – Middle School KIPP Delta Collegiate Helena, AR – High School KIPP Delta Elem. Literacy Academy Helena, AR 1- Elementary School CALIFORNIA KIPP Academy of Opportunity Los Angeles, CA 2- Middle School KIPP Adelante Preparatory Academy San Diego, CA 2- Middle School KIPP Bayview Academy San Francisco, CA 2- Middle School KIPP Bridge Charter School Oakland, CA 2- Middle School KIPP Comienza Community Prep Los Angeles, CA 1- Elementary School KIPP Empower Academy Los Angeles, CA 1- Elementary School KIPP Heartwood Academy San Jose, CA 2- Middle School KIPP Iluminar Academy Los Angeles, CA 1- Elementary School KIPP King Collegiate – High School San Lorenzo, CA 3- High School KIPP LA College Preparatory School Los Angeles, CA 2- Middle School KIPP Philosophers Academy Los Angeles, CA 2- Middle School KIPP Raíces Academy Los Angeles, CA 1- Elementary School KIPP San Francisco Bay Academy San Francisco, CA 2- Middle School KIPP San Francisco College Preparatory San Francisco, CA 3- High School KIPP San Jose Collegiate San Jose, CA 3- High School KIPP Scholar Academy Los Angeles, CA 2- Middle School KIPP Sol Academy Los Angeles, CA 2- Middle School KIPP Summit Academy San Lorenzo, CA 2- Middle School COLORADO KIPP Denver Collegiate – High School Denver, CO 3- High School KIPP Montbello College Prep Denver, CO 2- Middle School KIPP Sunshine Peak Academy Denver, CO 2- Middle School FLORIDA KIPP Impact – Middle School Jacksonville, FL 2- Middle School KIPP VOICE – Elementary School Jacksonville, FL 1- Elementary School GEORGIA KIPP Atlanta Collegiate Atlanta, GA 3- High School KIPP South Fulton Academy East Point, GA 2- Middle School KIPP STRIVE Academy Atlanta, GA 2- Middle School KIPP STRIVE Primary Atlanta, GA 1- Elementary School KIPP Vision Academy Atlanta, GA 2- Middle School KIPP Vision Primary Atlanta, GA 1- Elementary School KIPP WAYS Academy Atlanta, GA 2- Middle School ILLINOIS KIPP Ascend – Middle School Chicago, IL 2- Middle School KIPP Ascend Primary School Chicago, IL 1- Elementary School KIPP Create – Middle School Chicago, IL 2- Middle School INDIANA KIPP Indianapolis College Preparatory Indianapolis, IN 2- Middle School LOUISIANA KIPP Believe College Prep New Orleans, LA 2- Middle School KIPP Believe Primary New Orleans, LA 1- Elementary School KIPP Central City Academy New Orleans, LA 2- Middle School KIPP Central City Primary New Orleans, LA 1- Elementary School KIPP McDonogh 15 – Middle School New Orleans, LA 2- Middle School KIPP McDonogh 15 Primary New Orleans, LA 1- Elementary School KIPP New Orleans Leadership Academy New Orleans, LA 2- Middle School KIPP New Orleans Leadership Primary New Orleans, LA 1- Elementary School KIPP Renaissance – High School New Orleans, LA 3- High School MARYLAND KIPP Harmony Academy Baltimore, MD 1- Elementary School KIPP Ujima Village Academy Baltimore, MD 2- Middle School MASSACHUSETTS KIPP Academy Boston Boston, MA 2- Middle School KIPP Academy Lynn Lynn, MA 2- Middle School KIPP Academy Lynn Collegiate Lynn, MA 3- High School MINNESOTA KIPP Stand Academy Minneapolis, MN 2- Middle School MISSOURI KIPP Endeavor Academy Kansas City, MO 2- Middle School KIPP Inspire Academy St. Louis, MO 2- Middle School NEW JERSEY Newark Collegiate Academy Newark, NJ 3- High School Rise Academy Newark, NJ 2- Middle School Seek Academy Newark, NJ 1- Elementary School SPARK Academy Newark, NJ 1- Elementary School TEAM Academy Newark, NJ 2- Middle School THRIVE Academy Newark, NJ 1- Elementary School NEW YORK KIPP Academy – Elementary School New York (Bronx), NY 1- Elementary School KIPP Academy New York New York (Bronx), NY 2- Middle School KIPP AMP Academy New York (Brooklyn), NY 2- Middle School KIPP AMP – Elementary School New York (Brooklyn), NY 1- Elementary School KIPP Infinity Charter School New York (Manhattan), NY 2- Middle School KIPP Infinity – Elementary School New York (Manhattan), NY 1- Elementary School KIPP NYC College Prep – High School New York (Manhattan), NY 3- High School KIPP STAR College Prep Charter School New York (Manhattan), NY 2- Middle School KIPP STAR – Elementary School New York (Manhattan), NY 1- Elementary School KIPP TECH VALLEY Albany, NY 2- Middle School KIPP Washington Heights New York (Manhattan), NY 2- Middle School NORTH CAROLINA KIPP Charlotte Charlotte, NC 2- Middle School KIPP Gaston College Preparatory Gaston, NC 2- Middle School KIPP Gaston College Preparatory Primary Gaston, NC 1- Elementary School KIPP Pride – High School Gaston, NC 3- High School OHIO KIPP Journey Academy Columbus, OH 2- Middle School OKLAHOMA KIPP Reach College Preparatory Oklahoma City, OK KIPP Tulsa College Preparatory Tulsa, OK 2- Middle School PENNSYLVANIA KIPP DuBois Collegiate Academy Philadelphia, PA 3- High School KIPP Philadelphia Charter School Philadelphia, PA 2- Middle School KIPP Philadelphia – Elementary School Academy Philadelphia, PA 1- Elementary School KIPP West Philadelphia Preparatory Philadelphia, PA 2- Middle School TENNESSEE KIPP Academy Nashville Nashville, TN 2- Middle School KIPP Memphis Academy – Elementary School Memphis, TN 1- Elementary School KIPP Memphis Academy – Middle School Memphis, TN 2- Middle School KIPP Memphis Collegiate – Elementary School Memphis, TN 1- Elementary School KIPP Memphis Collegiate – High School Memphis, TN 3- High School KIPP Memphis Collegiate – Middle School Memphis, TN 2- Middle School KIPP Memphis Preparatory – Middle School Memphis, TN 2- Middle School KIPP Nashville College Prep Nashville, TN 2- Middle School TEXAS KIPP 3D Academy Houston, TX 2- Middle School KIPP Academy – Middle School Houston, TX 2- Middle School KIPP Aspire Academy San Antonio, TX 2- Middle School KIPP Austin Academy of Arts & Letters Austin, TX 2- Middle School KIPP Austin Beacon Prep Austin, TX 2- Middle School KIPP Austin College Prep Austin, TX 2- Middle School KIPP Austin Collegiate Austin, TX 3- High School KIPP Austin Comunidad Austin, TX 1- Elementary School KIPP Austin Connections – Elementary School Austin, TX 1- Elementary School KIPP Austin Leadership – Elementary School Austin, TX 1- Elementary School KIPP Austin Obras Austin, TX 1- Elementary School KIPP Austin Vista – Middle School Austin, TX 2- Middle School KIPP Camino Academy San Antonio, TX 2- Middle School KIPP Coastal Village – Middle School Galveston, TX 2- Middle School KIPP Coastal Village Primary School Galveston, TX 1- Elementary School KIPP Courage College Prep Houston, TX 2- Middle School KIPP SHARP College Prep Lower School Houston, TX 1- Elementary School KIPP Sharpstown College Prep Houston, TX 2- Middle School KIPP SHINE Prep Houston, TX 1- Elementary School KIPP Destiny – Elementary School Dallas, TX 1- Elementary School KIPP DREAM Prep Houston, TX 1- Elementary School KIPP Esperanza Dual Language Academy San Antonio, TX 1- Elementary School KIPP Explore Academy Houston, TX 1- Elementary School KIPP Generations Collegiate Houston, TX 3- High School KIPP Houston – High School Houston, TX 3- High School KIPP Intrepid Preparatory School Houston, TX 2- Middle School KIPP Legacy Preparatory School Houston, TX 1- Elementary School KIPP Liberation College Prep Houston, TX 2- Middle School KIPP Northeast College Preparatory Houston, TX 3- High School KIPP PEACE – Elementary School Houston, TX 1- Elementary School KIPP Polaris Academy for Boys Houston, TX 2- Middle School KIPP Un Mundo Dual Language Academy San Antonio, TX 1- Elementary School KIPP University Prep – High School San Antonio, TX 3- High School KIPP Spirit College Prep Houston, TX 2- Middle School KIPP Sunnyside – High School Houston, TX 3- High School KIPP TRUTH Academy Dallas, TX 2- Middle School KIPP Voyage Academy for Girls Houston, TX 2- Middle School KIPP ZENITH Academy Houston, TX 1- Elementary School WASHINGTON, DC KIPP DC: AIM Academy Washington, DC 2- Middle School KIPP DC: College Preparatory Washington, DC 3- High School KIPP DC: Connect Academy Washington, DC 1- Elementary School KIPP DC: Discover Academy Washington, DC 1- Elementary School KIPP DC: Grow Academy Washington, DC 1- Elementary School KIPP DC: Heights Academy Washington, DC 1- Elementary School KIPP DC: KEY Academy Washington, DC 2- Middle School KIPP DC: Lead Academy Washington, DC 1- Elementary School KIPP DC: LEAP Academy Washington, DC 1- Elementary School KIPP DC: Promise Academy Washington, DC 1- Elementary School KIPP DC: Spring Academy Washington, DC 1- Elementary School KIPP DC: WILL Academy Washington, DC 2- Middle School
Charter Schools  Charter schools are public schools that have been released from some of the regulations governing other public schools as long as they succeed in meeting the criteria agreed upon in their original charter. Charter schools tend to have limited enrollment and usually accept students through an application process. California Connecticut Florida Georgia Illinois Indiana Louisiana Massachusetts Michigan New Jersey New York North Carolina Ohio Pennsylvania Texas Virginia Washington DC
ALABAMA Holy Family Cristo Rey High School, Birmingham – Birmingham, AL www.hfcristorey.org/ ARIZONA Imago Dei Middle School – Tuscon, AZ www.imagodeischool.org/ San Miguel High School, Tucson – Tuscon, AZ www.sanmiguelcristorey.org/ ARKANSAS Arkansas Baptist Children’s Homes and Family Ministries – Little Rock, AR Children’s Homes – Paragould, AR CALIFORNIA Casa Pacifica – Camarillo, CA Cristo Rey High School, Sacramento – Sacramento, CA www.cristoreysacramento.org/ Cristo Rey San Jose High School – San Jose, CA www.cristoreysanjose.org DeMarillac Middle School – San Francisco, CA www.demarillac.org/ Immaculate Conception High School, San Francisco – San Francisco, CA www.icacademy.org/ Midland School – Los Olivos, CA www.midland-school.org/ Nativity Prep Academy of San Diego – San Diego, CA www.nativityprep.org/ Sacred Heart Schools of Nativity – San Jose, CA www.shnativity.org/ Verbum Dei High School, Los Angeles – Los Angeles, CA www.verbumdei.us/ Orangewood Children’s Foundation – Santa Ana, CA Nest Foundation – Los Angeles, CA COLORADO Eagle Rock School and Professional Development Center – Estes Park, CO www.eaglerockschool.org/ Escuela de Guadalupe – Denver, CO www.escuelaguadalupe.org/ Arrupe Jesuit High School, Denver – Denver, CO www.arrupejesuit.com/ CONNECTICUT Covenant Preparatory School – Hartford, CT www.covenantprep.org/ The Gilbert School – Winsted, CT www.gilbertschool.org/ Hyde Schools –New Haven, CT www.hyde.edu/ St. Martin de Porres Academy – New Haven, CT www.saintmartinacademy.org/ DELAWARE Nativity Preparatory School of Wilmington – Wilmington, DE nativitywilmington.org/ Serviam Girls Academy – New Castle, DE www.serviamgirlsacademy.org/ FLORIDA Academy Prep of St. Petersburg – St. Petersburg, FL http://www.academyprep.org/ Academy Prep of Tampa– Tampa, FL http://www.academyprep.org/ Covenant Academy Preparatory – Tallahassee, FL (850) 575-2277 Renaissance Village – West Palm Beach, FL Safe Harbor Boys Maritime Academy – Jacksonville, FL boyshome.com/ GEORGIA Bethesda Academy – Savannah, GA www.bethesdaacademy.org/ Cristo Rey Atlanta High School – Atlanta, GA www.atlantacristorey.org ILLINOIS<br /> Chicago Jesuit Academy– Chicago, IL www.chicagojesuitacademy.org/ Chicago Jesuit Academy – Chicago, IL www.chicagojesuitacademy.org/ Cristo Rey Jesuit High School, Chicago – Chicago, IL www.cristorey.net/ Christ the King Jesuit College Preparatory High School, Chicago – Chicago, IL www.ctkjesuit.org/ Cristo Rey St. Martin College Prep –Waukegan, IL http://cristoreystmartin.org/ Glenwood Academy – Glenwood, IL www.glenwoodacademy.org/ Hadley School for the Blind – Winnetka IL www.hadley.edu/ San Miguel Chicago – Chicago, IL sanmiguelchicago.org/ Mooseheart Child city and School – Chicago, IL INDIANA Heritage Mission – Huntertown, IN heritagemission.org/ Providence Cristo Rey High School, Indianapolis – Indianapolis, IN www.pcrhs.org/ IOWA Quakerdale- New Providence, IA KENTUCKY Nativity Academy at St. Boniface – Louisville, KY www.nativitylouisville.org/ Oakdale Christian Academy – Lexington, Kentucky www.oakdalechristian.org/ MARYLAND Cristo Rey Jesuit High School, Baltimore – Baltimore, MD www.cristoreybalt.org/ Mother Seton Academy – Baltimore, MD http://www.mothersetonacademy.org/ SEED Public Charter School –Baltimore, MD www.seedschooldc.org/ St. Ignatius Loyola Academy – Baltimore, MD www.saintignatius.org/ MAINE Hyde Schools –Bath, ME www.hyde.edu/ MASSACHUSETTS Blessed Stephen Bellesini OSA Academy – Lawrence, MA www.bellesiniacademy.org/ Cristo Rey Boston High School – Boston, MA www.cristoreyboston.org/ Epiphany School, Dorchester, MA epiphanyschool.com/ Esperanza Academy – Lawrence, MA www.esperanzaacademy.org/ Mother Caroline Academy and Education Center – Dorchester, MA www.mcaec.org/ Nativity Preparatory School of Boston – Boston, MA www.nativityboston.org/ Nativity Preparatory School of New Bedford – Bedford, MA nativitynb.org/ Nativity School of Worchester – Worchester, MA www.nativityworcester.org/ Notre Dame Cristo Rey High School, Lawrence – Lawrence, MA www.ndhslaw.org/ MICHIGAN Detroit Cristo Rey High School – Detroit, MI www.detroitcristorey.org/ Good Will Farm – Houghton, MI MINNESOTA Covenant Academy – St. Paul/Minneapolis, MN (507) 333-1327 Cristo Rey Jesuit High School – Twin Cities –Minneapolis, MN www.cristoreytc.org/ MISSISSIPPI Palmer Home – Columbus, MS MISSOURI Access Academy – Most Holy Trinity Academy – St. Louis, MO http://accessacademies.org/schools/holy-trinity-academy/ Access Academy – St. Cecelia’s Academy – St. Louis, MO http://accessacademies.org/schools/st-cecilias-academy/ Access Academy – St. Louis the King at the Cathedral Academy – St. Louis, MO http://accessacademies.org/ Access Academy – Central Catholic Academy – St. Louis, MO http://www.accessacademies.org/Schools/central_catholic.html Central Catholic Academy – St. Louis, MO http://www.accessacademies.org/Schools/central_catholic.html Cristo Rey Kansas City High School – Kansas City, MO www.cristoreykc.org/ De La Salle Middle School at St. Matthews – St. Louis, MO delasallems.org/ Loyola Academy – St. Louis, MO http://www.loyolaacademy.org/ Marian Middle School – St. Louis, MO marianmiddleschool.org/ NEBRASKA The Jesuit Academy – Omaha, NE http://www.jesuitacademy.org/ NEW JERSEY Christ the King Preparatory School, Newark – Newark, NJ ctkprep.org/ Sisters Academy – Asbury Park, NJ http://www.mercycenternj.org/sisteracademy.php NEW MEXICO Cristo Rey Albuquerque High School – Albuquerque, NM http://www.cristoreynetwork.org NEW YORK Brooklyn Jesuit Prep– Brooklyn, NY www.nynativity.org/ Cornelia Connelly Center – New York, NY http://www.connellycenter.org/node/891 Cristo Rey Brooklyn High School – Brooklyn, NY cristoreybrooklyn.org Cristo Rey New York High School – New York, NY www.cristoreyny.org/ The De La Salle School – Freeport, NY www.delasalleschool.org/ The Good Shepherd School – Brooklyn, NY www.goodshepherdbklyn.org/ Graham Windham – New York, NY Hyde Schools – Bronx, NY www.hydebronxny.org/ The Nativity Miguel Middle School of Buffalo – Buffalo, NY www.nativitymiguelbuffalo.org/ Nativity Preparatory of Rochester – Rochester, NY www.nativityrochester.org/ Nora Cronin Presentation Academy – Newburgh, NY www.noracroninpresentationacademy.com/ Regis High School – New York, NY www.regis-nyc.org/ San Miguel Newburgh – Newburgh, NY www.newburghsanmiguel.org/ St. Aloysius School – New York, NY www.staloysiusschool.org/ St. Ignatius School – Bronx, NY www.nynativity.org/sis/ NORTH CAROLINA Crossnore School – Crossnore, NC www.crossnoreschool.org/ Durham Nativity School – Durham, NC www.durhamnativity.org/ OHIO Cristo Rey Columbus High School – Columbus, OH www.cristoreycolumbus.org DePaul Cristo Rey High School, Cincinnati – Cincinnati, OH www.depaulcristorey.org/ St. James the Less School – Columbus, OH www.stjames.cdeducation.org/ St. Martin de Porres High School, Cleveland – Cleveland, OH www.saintmartincleveland.org/ OKLAHOMA Goodland Academy – Hugo, OK www.goodland.org/ Oklahoma Baptist Home – Oklahoma City, OK San Miguel Tulsa – Tulsa, OK www.sanmigueltulsa.org/ White Fields – Piedmont, OK OREGON De La Salle North Catholic High School, Portland – Portland, OR www.delasallenorth.org/ St. Andrews Nativity School – Portland, OR www.nativityportland.com/ PENNSYLVANIA Cristo Rey Philadelphia High School – Philadelphia, PA www.phillycr.org/ GESU School – Philadelphia, PA www.gesuschool.org/ Girard College (FREE Boarding School) – Philadelphia, PA www.girardcollege.edu/ Hope Partnership for Education – Philadelphia, PA www.hopepartnershipforeducation.org/ LaSalle Academy – Philadelphia, PA http://www.lasalleacademy.net/ Milton Hershey School (FREE Boarding School) – Hershey, PA www.mhs-pa.org/ Nativity Preparatory School of Harrisburg – Harrisburg, PA http://www.nativityharrisburg.org.161.gppnetwork.com/ The Neighborhood Academy – Pittsburgh, PA www.theneighborhoodacademy.org/ RHODE ISLAND San Miguel School of Providence – Providence, RI sanmiguelprov.org/ SOUTH CAROLINA Connie Maxwell – Greenwood, SC SOUTH DAKOTA South Dakota School for the Deaf – Sioux Falls, SD www.sdsd.sdbor.edu/ St. Joseph’s Indian School – Chamberlain, SD www.stjo.org/ TEXAS Cristo Rey Jesuit College Preparatory School of Houston – Houston, TX www.cristoreyjesuit.org/ Guadalupe Regional Middle School – Brownsville, TX guadalupe.schoolfusion.us/ Ben Richey Boys Ranch – Abilene, TX Boys and Girls Country School – Hockley, TX Children at Heart Ministries – Round Rock, TX Happy Hill Farm Academy – Granbury, TX www.happyhillfarm.org/ Methodist Children’s – Waco, TX Miracle Farm – Brenham, TX Presbyterian Children’s – Austin, TX Starry School – Round Rock, TX Texas Baptist Children’s – Round Rock, TX TENNESSEE St. Cecilia Academy – Nashville, TN www.stcecilia.edu/ Tennessee Baptist Children’s – Brentwood, TN VIRGINIA Boys Home – Covington, VA www.boyshomeinc.org/ Hopetree Academy – Salem, VA https://hopetreefs.org/childrens-youth-services/hopetree-academy/ WASHINGTON, DC Don Bosco Cristo Rey High School, WashingtoD.C. – Washington, DC www.donboscocristorey.org/ Friends of Yemin Order – Washington, DC Hyde Schools –Washington, DC http://www.hyde.edu Maya Angelou – Washington, DC www.seeforever.org/ Perry Street Prep – Washington, DC www.hydedc.org/ San Miguel School of Washington DC – Washington, DC sanmigueldc.org/ SEED Public Charter School – Washington, DC www.seedschooldc.org/ Washington Jesuit Academy – Washington, DC www.wjacademy.org/ Washington Middle School for Girls – Washington, DC www.washingtonmiddleschoolforgirls.org/ WISCONSIN Cristo Rey Milwaukee High School – Milwaukee, WI http://www.cristoreynetwork.org Nativity Jesuit Middle School – Milwaukee, WI – Washington, DC www.njms.org/ Notre Dame Middle School – Milwaukee, WI www.ndmswi.org/ Cristo del Rey Schools San Miguel/Nativity Schools
HEAD START www.nhsa.org HEADQUARTERS: 1651 Prince Street Alexandria, VA 22314 Phone: 703-739-0875 Fax: 703-739-0878 The Head Start program provides grants to local public and private non-profit and for-profit agencies to provide comprehensive child development services to economically disadvantaged children and families, with a special focus on helping preschoolers develop the early reading and math skills they need to be successful in school. Head Start programs promote school readiness by enhancing the social and cognitive development of children through the provision of educational, health, nutritional, social and other services to enrolled children and families. They engage parents in their children’s learning and help them in making progress toward their educational, literacy and employment goals. A BETTER CHANCE www.abetterchance.org HEADQUARTERS: 240 W 35th Street, 9th Floor New York, NY 10001 Phone: 646-346-1310 Fax: 646-346-1311 A Better Chance is the preeminent resource for identifying, recruiting and developing leaders among young people of color in the United States. A Better Chance works with some of the most elite private schools in the nation to give outstanding minority students opportunities they may not otherwise have. EDUCARE http://www.educareschools.org/home/index.php Through a growing coast-to-coast network of state-of-the-art, full-day, year-round schools, funded mostly by existing public dollars, Educare serves at-risk children from birth to 5 years. National Coalition for Campus Children’s Centers info@campuschildren.org 950 Glenn Drive, Suite 150 Folsom, CA 95630 (877) 736-6222 | (916) 932-2209 Promotes the establishment and maintenance of high quality child care and early education programs to enable parents to further their education and be gainfully employed. Campus Children’s Centers Blueprints for Healthy Youth Development www.blueprintsprograms.com/ Blueprints for Healthy Youth Development, an interactive website helps you match children’s needs and makes it easy to select to cost-effective programs that have been proven to help them reach their full potential. Find programs that meet the highest scientific standard of evidence for promoting youth behavior, education, emotional well-being, health, and positive relationships. Connects Government Agencies, Community Organizations with Proven Cost-Effective Programs CDF Freedom Schools® Program http://www.childrensdefense.org/programs-campaigns/freedom-schools/ The CDF Freedom Schools program provides summer and after-school enrichment that helps children fall in love with reading, increases their self-esteem, and generates more positive attitudes toward learning.
Check to see if you or your student meets the qualifications for a free ride. Some colleges or aid programs could save you thousands. News about college tuition is rarely good. As schools continue to raise prices, students are taking on an increasing amount of debt. According to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, a federal agency created to help consumers understand financial products and services, student loan debt currently tops $1 trillion. Research from the Project on Student Debt, a nonprofit dedicated to increasing access to higher education, finds that one in 10 students graduates with $40,000 or more in undergraduate debt. Even if you’re not a straight-A student, an all-star athlete or inclined to apply for some of the world’s strangest scholarships, you can still find programs that will pay the college tab for you. Here are eight reasons someone else might pay your tuition:  
    1. You attend an ‘automatic scholarship’ school Students at Macaulay Honors College, part of the City University of New York system, don’t stress about the high price of tuition. That’s because theirs is free. At Macaulay and a handful of other service academies, work colleges, single-subject schools and conservatories, every student receives a full merit-based tuition scholarship for all four years. Macaulay students also receive a laptop and $7,500 in “opportunities funds” to pursue research, service experiences, study abroad programs and internships. “The most important thing is not the free tuition, but the freedom of studying without the burden of debt on your back,” says Ann Kirschner, the university dean of Macaulay. The debt burden, she says, “really compromises decisions students make in college, and we are giving them the opportunity to be free of that.” Schools that grant free tuition to all students are rare, but institutions increasingly provide automatic aid to enrollees with high grades. Such institutions as Indiana University Bloomington, Truman State University in Kirksville, Mo., and the University of Kentucky in Lexington all offer automatic awards to high-performing students with stellar GPAs and class ranks. Residency requirements may apply.
 
    1. Your family financially qualifies Low-income families automatically qualify for some federal financial aid, but many schools step in to fill the remaining gap. At Soka University of America in Aliso Viejo, Calif., all undergrads in the liberal arts program whose families earn $60,000 per year or less receive free tuition, a value of $27,214 for the 2012-2013 school year. Families still have to foot room and board charges. “The maximum (federal) Pell Grant is right around $5,500 . . . that’s not enough to meet most tuitions at private universities across the country,” says Soka director of enrollment services Andrew Woolsey. Soka’s not alone. Columbia University in New York and Texas A&M University in College Station both offer 100% free tuition for families with adjusted gross incomes of less than $60,000. Harvard University offers free rides to those with family incomes of $65,000 or less. Among the 1,171 institutions that provide information to U.S. News & World Report for their annual college rankings issue, the magazine reports that 62 meet 100% of enrollees’ financial needs. To find out a school’s policy on meeting need, call the institution’s financial aid office.
 
    1. You have native roots Since 2010, approximately 2,400 students in Michigan have attended college for free through the state’s Native American tuition waiver program, says Melissa Claramunt, American Indian and civil rights specialist for the Michigan Department of Civil Rights. Available to state residents who are at least one-quarter Native American and enrolled in a federally recognized tribe, the waiver absolves eligible students from paying tuition at any two- or four-year public in-state institution. Claramunt adds that a few states offer tuition waiver programs for Native American students, but that even more individual institutions may offer waivers or special financial aid for indigenous students, including Eskimo and Aleut, as well as those hailing from historically disadvantaged backgrounds. “It is worth (a student’s) while to look into individual tuition waivers,” she says. “It always would behoove a student to check into programs for certain populations or certain types of student.” Students from these backgrounds may also find additional financial help through the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs and the American Indian College Fund.
 
    1. You survived hardship Certain states also offer tuition waivers for students who have overcome significant adversity. In Michigan, for example, residents who have had Medicaid coverage for at least two years may be eligible for full tuition and fees at in-state public two-year institutions or up to $2,000 in assistance at in-state public four-year schools. To qualify, students must enroll no later than four years after finishing high school. A few states, including Minnesota, grant tuition waivers to students who have survived a substantial natural disaster, though how many of these waivers are available and who gets them are up to individual institutions. Other states, such as Massachusetts and Connecticut, provide free tuition at public schools to state-resident spouses and children of Sept. 11 victims. Private memorial scholarships for dependents of Sept. 11 victims abound, and the federal government offers immediate federal loan forgiveness for parents and spouses of those lost. Obstacles that resulted in unusually high medical bills or other costs aren’t reported in the federal aid methodology. To ensure that financial aid officers are aware of these costs, eligible students should be prepared to file a professional judgment form and provide documentation.
 
    1. You have the right job Most schools offer free tuition to their full-time employees, and many extend the offer to dependents and part-timers as well. According to Greg Hand, the director of public relations for the University of Cincinnati, these programs frequently come with limitations. “It’s difficult to be a full-time employee and a full-time student,” he says. “Beyond six credit hours, a (University of Cincinnati) employee needs some sort of special permission to take a course load greater than that.” Hand adds that his school’s tuition remission program doesn’t cover fees, and that remission for graduate coursework may be considered taxable income. A career in public service may open doors at some institutions. For example, the University of Washington in Seattle and Florida State University in Tallahassee extend tuition waivers to some state employees. A few schools, including Middlesex County College in Edison, N.J., offer limited waivers to volunteer firefighters, rescue squad workers, first aid professionals and their spouses and dependents.
 
    1. You have no job An unmarried independent student with no income will most likely qualify for the maximum $5,550 in Pell Grant funds for the 2012-2013 school year and may qualify for up to an additional $4,000 Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant from the federal government. On top of the need-based aid their school offers, the unemployed may find help through state retraining programs. New Jersey, for instance, offers a full-tuition waiver at in-state public schools for workers who have been out of a job for at least three years. Several states and individual schools offer waivers and tuition support for dislocated workers and victims of mass layoffs. Help on the state and college levels is also available for permanently disabled students who can’t find work. State vocational rehabilitation departments often offer specialized scholarships and tuition reduction opportunities, and Disaboom maintains a list of awards offered through various private and nonprofit organizations. Tuition waivers for public institutions are available in Maryland and Minnesota, though restrictions may apply. Certain individual institutions may offer them as well.
 
    1. You were adopted or were a foster child Financial aid at the state and institutional levels is abundant for young adults coming from adoption or foster care backgrounds, as well as those who are or have been wards of the state. Many states and individual institutions offer tuition waivers at in-state public schools for these students, while private organizations and nonprofits, including the Foster Care to Success and the National Foster Parent Association, offer outside aid. Students who have been in the foster care system, or who have become orphaned or wards of the state at any point since turning 13, may be eligible for heftier federal financial aid. These students, as well as legally emancipated minors, are considered independent students by the Department of Education. That means their federal aid package will be based on their income and assets, not the income and assets of their parents or guardians, which will likely make them eligible for more federal aid.
 
  1. You’re heading back Ready to go back to school? The Evergreen State College in Olympia, Wash., will give you a taste for free. The school offers a one-time tuition waiver good for four credits to new students taking courses through the school’s Evening and Weekend Studies program. “(The waiver) is basically designed for adult students returning to school,” says Kelly Norman, an Evergreen admissions counselor. “A lot of times, people will take some classes in our Evening and Weekend catalog to see if they’re a good fit for our institution or to see if they can go back to school. Sometimes getting back in the groove takes time.” Evergreen and many other schools across the country also offer tuition waivers for senior citizens, though the age eligibility requirements can range from 60 to 65. Other institutions, such as James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Va., and the City University of New York, offer college credit for life experience. Grants and scholarships for older, nontraditional students are also available through both private organizations and individual colleges.
       
      1. Source:
http://money.msn.com/college-savings/8-ways-to-go-to-college-for-free-bankrate.aspx  
The U.S. government offers some of the best deals around — enroll at one of the five service academies tuition-free and receive free room and board. But if military service isn’t for you, other schools offer tuition-free education as well.
  1. College of the Ozarks www.cofo.edu/ One of the top liberal arts colleges in the Midwest. Students pay no tuition and work at least 15 hours a week at a campus work station. At this school of 1,400; students are graded on their work performance in addition to their academics.
  2. Deep Springs College www.deepsprings.edu/ Deep Springs is a two-year, all-male liberal arts college located on a cattle ranch and alfalfa farm in the Inyo-White Mountains of California’s High Desert. Every student admitted – 10 to 15 per year – receives free tuition, room, and board, and works at least 20 hours a week on the ranch. Most students complete their degrees at prestigious four-year schools after leaving Deep Springs.
  3. Berea College www.berea.edu/ The first interracial and co-ed college in the South, every student admitted to Berea College in Kentucky receives a full-tuition scholarship valued at more than $90,000. Students are required to work at least 10 hours a week in one of more than 140 departments, and while room, board, and books are not covered, the work-study program enables some of the 1,500 students to lighten their financial. Berea offers degrees in 28 fields.
  4. Olin College of Engineering www.olin.edu/ Olin College is a school of 300 in Neeedham, Mass., where every admitted student receives four years of free tuition valued at $130,000. The school is funded by a $400 million grant from thF.W. Olin Foundation and ranks as one of the top undergraduate engineering programs in the country.
  5. Cooper Union cooper.edu/ Located in Manhattan, Cooper Union offers degree programs in art, architecture, and engineering, and every admitted student receives four years of free tuition valued at $130,000. The admissions rate at Cooper Union is about 8 percent, while the enrollment is a little more than 900. The Cooper Union endowment is valued at nearly $600 million.
  6. Curtis Institute of Music www.curtis.edu/ Like Juillard, the Curtis Institute of Music is considered one of the most prestigious performing arts conservatories in the world. Unlike Juillard, tuition at Curtis is free. Every student admitted to the school of 160 in Philadelphia is provided a full scholarship, and all piano, harpsichord, composition, and conducting majors are lent Steinway grand pianos.
  7. Alice Lloyd College www.alc.edu/ All students at Alice Lloyd College in Pippa Passes, KY., are required to work at least 10 hours per week in exchange for free tuition. Students who need additional financial aid to pay for room and board may work up to 15 hours per week. Jobs at the school of 550 are assigned based on a student’s work experience and personal preference.
  8. Web Institute www.webb-institute.edu/Webb Institute is an engineering college in Glen Cove, NY offering full tuition scholarships for the study of naval architecture and marine engineering.
  9. Barclay College www.barclaycollege.edu/ Barclay College in Haviland, Kansas offers a full tuition scholarship (also known as our Free Tuition Scholarship) to all on-campus students. This scholarship is worth $11000 per student.
  10. US Military Academy www.usma.edu/ The United States Military Academy at West Point is a four-year coeducational federal service academy located in West Point, New York.
  11. US Air Force Academy www.usafa.af.mil/ The United States Air Force Academy is a military school for officer candidates for the United States Air Force. Its campus is located immediately north of Colorado Springs in El Paso County, Colorado
  12. US Merchant Marine Academy www.usmma.edu/ The United States Merchant Marine Academy is one of the five United States Service academies. It is charged with training officers for the United States Merchant Marine, branches of the military, or the transportation industry
  13. US Coast Guard Academy www.uscga.edu/ The United States Coast Guard Academy is the military academy of the United States Coast Guard. Located in New London, Connecticut, it is the smallest of the five federal service academies
  14. William E. Macaulay Honors College www.macaulay.cuny.edu/William E. Macaulay Honors College @ CUNY is a flagship program for 1,400 high achieving students at The City University of New York offering Full Undergraduate Tuition Scholarship, Laptop computer and $7500 Opportunities Fund to pursue global research, study, service, and internships.
  1. Research schools. Look for a school with programs that are of interest to you. Ask around; go online to find out if the school is a good match for you. Weigh different financial aid and scholarship options. Find out if it you can afford it.
  2. Contact schools and request information and applications.
  3. Pay attention to application deadlines.
  4. Prepare for standardized tests—Study independently, create a study group, find an affordable test prep program. On test day, make sure you are well-rested, have eaten a good breakfast and are in a clear state of mind. If you can, it’s wise to take standardized tests more than once to make sure you get the best score possible.
  5. Write your essays. Think of topics that set you apart from other students. Find a way to emphasize how unique you are and how you would add value to the school.
  6. Get recommendation letters from people who think highly of you, are good judges of character and will add credibility to your application.
  7. Research financial aid and scholarship options.
  8. Get money together for application fees.
  9. Get your school transcripts sent to the schools of your choice.
  10. If possible, visit the schools to help you in your decision.
Student Loans You might be qualified to borrow an additional student loan such as an unsubsidized Stafford Loan or a private education loan. These loans tend to be more expensive than need-based loans. Unsubsidized Loans Students who don’t demonstrate need, or need to borrow more than the subsidized loan amount, can borrow unsubsidized Stafford loans. Unlike subsidized loans, you are responsible for paying interest on the loan while in school. Private Student Loans There are thousands of non-government loans available to students. Search online, visit your local library and seek the advice of your guidance counselor to find out which scholarships you may be eligible for. Parent Loans Your parents can take out loans to cover college costs. They’ll need to meet certain criteria like demonstrating good credit to qualify for most loans. Federal PLUS Loans The most popular loans for the parents of dependent undergraduate students are PLUS Loans. Parents can borrow up to the full cost of tuition, minus any financial aid. Federal Grad PLUS Loans Graduate students can borrow up to the full cost of tuition minus any financial aid. Students are not required to repay the while in school and can request 6-month deferment upon leaving school. Home Equity Loans If your parents are homeowners, they can borrow against their home. Your parents may be eligible to borrow a percentage of their equity, the difference between the market value and how much is owed on the mortgage. This money can be used to pay for education costs. The rate is comparable to other borrowing options. The interest paid on this loan may be tax deductible, but they may have to pay a fee for this type of loan. IRA Withdrawals You can withdraw from an IRA account to pay for college. An IRA is a savings account designed to put aside money for retirement. A 10 percent fee is charged if you withdraw money before you reach age 59 except when the money is used to pay for college. But, you may need to pay federal and state income tax on your withdrawals. Tuition Tax Credits A tax credit is an amount of money you can subtract from your federal tax bill. It is a dollar-for-dollar reduction of the amount you owe. If you have family members in college, and your income doesn’t exceed certain limits, you may apply for a tax credit.
Annual Signet Classic Scholarship Essay Contest Open to high school juniors and seniors. You must write an essay on one of three selected topics listed on the Web site to be considered for this award. In addition to the $1,000 scholarship awarded to you if you are a winning student, your high school will also receive a Signet Classic library. Coca-Cola Scholarship Post Office Box 442 Atlanta, GA 30301-0442 Phone: 1-800-306-2653 Fax: 404-733-5439 Provide scholarship programs and enrichment opportunities in support of exceptional young peoples’ thirst for knowledge and their desire to make a difference in the world. Develop a powerful network of community leaders, touched by Coca−Cola, whose vision will help shape the world, leaving a lasting legacy for generations to come. Gates Millennium Scholars Program Gates Millennium Scholars P.O. Box 10500 Fairfax, VA 22031-8044 Phone: 1-877-690-4677 Initially funded by a $1 billion grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the goal of GMS is to promote academic excellence and to provide an opportunity for outstanding minority students with significant financial need to reach their highest potential. Jackie Robinson Foundation Scholarship Program One Hudson Square 75 Varick Street 2nd Floor New York, NY 10013-1917 Phone: 212-290-8600 Fax: 212-290-8081 Open to graduating minority high school seniors who have been accepted by a four-year accredited college or university. You must have a minimum 1000 SAT score or 21 ACT score, be a United States citizen and demonstrate academic achievement, leadership potential and financial need, and provide a personal essay and a letter of recommendation from your high school guidance counselor. This is a four-year award of up to $7,500 per year. Lowe’s Scholarship Open to all high school seniors who plan to attend any accredited two-year or four-year college or university within the United States. Winners are selected based on leadership qualities, community involvement and academic performance. 373 scholarships awarded ranging from $1,000 to $15,000. National Merit Scholarship 1560 Sherman Avenue Suite 200 Evanston, Illinois 60201-4897 Phone: 847-866-5100 Fax: 847-866-5113 Since its founding, NMSC has recognized 3 million students and provided over 335,000 scholarships worth more than $1.3 billion. The honors awarded by NMSC to exceptionally able students are viewed as definitive marks of excellence. Recipients of Merit Scholarship® awards, Achievement Scholarship® awards, and corporate-sponsored Special Scholarships have increased the nation’s respect for intellectual accomplishments and have contributed significantly to its talent pool of future leaders. QuestBridge 120 Hawthorne Avenue, Suite 103 Palo Alto, CA 94301 Phone: 650-331-3280 OR 1-888-275-2054 Fax: 650-653-2516 QuestBridge is a non-profit program that links bright, motivated low-income students with educational and scholarship opportunities at some of the nation’s best colleges. QuestBridge is the provider of the National College Match Program and the College Prep Scholarship. High school juniors with a strong academic record and an annual family income of less than $60,000 with typical assets are encouraged to apply. QuestBridge provides a single, internet-based meeting point which links exceptional students with the colleges, scholarship providers, employers, and organizations seeking students who have excelled despite obstacles. Robert C. Byrd Honors Foundation Scholarship U.S. Department of Education, OPE Higher Education Programs Institutional Development and Undergraduate Education Service Robert C. Byrd Honors Scholarship Program 1990 K Street, N.W., 6th floor Washington, DC 20006-8512 Phone: 202-502-7777 Fax: 202-502-7861 Students must contact the state education agency in their state of legal residence for application information. This program, which is federally funded and state-administered, is designed to recognize exceptionally able high school seniors who show promise of continued excellence in post- secondary education. The Department awards funds to state education agencies (SEAs), which make scholarship awards to eligible applicants. Students receive scholarships for college expenses.
  1. ACT-SO Olympics of the Mind Scholarships
  2. Actuarial Scholarships for Minority Students
  3. Ayn Rand Essay Scholarships
  4. Bell Labs Fellowships for Under Represented Minorities
  5. Black Alliance for Educational Options Scholarships
  6. BOEING scholarships
  7. Brand Essay Competition
  8. Burger King Scholarship Program
  9. Coca-Cola Two Year College Scholarships
  10. College Board Scholarship Search
  11. Easley National Scholarship Program
  12. FAFSA OnThe Web (Your Key Aid Form & Info)
  13. Federal Scholarships &Aid Gateways 25 Scholarship Gateways from Black Excel
  14. FinAid: The Smart Students Guide to Financial Aid scholarships
  15. Gates Millennium Scholarships
  16. GE and LuLac Scholarship Funds
  17. Graduate Fellowships For Minorities Nationwide
  18. HBCU Packard Sit Abroad Scholarships (for study around the world)
  19. Historically Black College & University Scholarships
  20. Holocaust Remembrance Scholarships
  21. Hope Scholarships & Lifetime Credits
  22. INROADS internships
  23. International Students Scholarships & Aid Help
  24. Jacki Tuckfield Memorial Graduate Business Scholarship (for students in South Florida)
  25. Jackie Robinson Foundation Scholarship Program
  26. Lowe’s Scholarship
  27. Maryland Artists Scholarships
  28. Microsoft Scholarship Program
  29. Multiple List of Minority Scholarships
  30. National Assoc. of Black Journalists Scholarships (NABJ)
  31. National Merit Scholarship
  32. Presidential Freedom Scholarships
  33. Rhodes Scholarships at Oxford
  34. The Roothbert Scholarship Fund
  35. Saul T. Wilson Scholarships (Veterinary)
  36. Scholarships and Fellowships
  37. Scholarship and Fellowship Opportunities
  38. Scholarship & Financial Aid Help
  39. Scholarship Links (Ed Finance Group)
  40. Scholarships for Study in Paralegal Studies
  41. ScienceNet Scholarship Listing
  42. Siemens Westinghouse Competition
  43. Sports Scholarships and Internships
  44. Student Inventors Scholarships
  45. Student Video Scholarships
  46. Thurgood Marshall Scholarship Fund
  47. Union Sponsored Scholarships and Aid
  48. William Randolph Hearst Endowed Scholarship for Minority Students
  49. Wired Scholar Free Scholarship
  50. Xerox Scholarships for Students
  1. Search Online – Look for things that reflect your interests, what you can do. The Web site will take you through a process and generate scholarships that you should apply for.
  2. Research Local Scholarships First – Ask your high school guidance counselor for scholarships students graduating from your high school or scholarships for residents of your town, county and state. You’ll have the best chance of winning a scholarship closer to home and among a smaller group of candidates.
  3. Check with your public library – Those without access to the Internet should go to the library to look at books and catalogs with scholarships. Most libraries will have a number of books about financial aid, including scholarship guides such as the College Board’s Scholarship Handbook. They also may have information on local scholarships.
  4. Check Membership Organizations and Employers – Explore religious, community service, fraternal, military, union and professional organizations as sources of scholarship money.
  5. Don’t overlook your parents – Tap into whatever scholarships or tuition programs offered for the children of employees. Have your parents check with their Human Resources Department for details.
  6. Check with your employer – Big companies like fast food chains, department stores, and supermarkets often give scholarships.
  7. Use a Free Scholarship Search Service – Scholarship search companies gather information on tons of awards and evaluate a student’s eligibility. You’ll be matched to possible scholarships based on your answers on a questionnaire and your overall eligibility.
  8. Contact Your State Department of Higher Education – Nearly every state has a scholarship program for residents, usually awards for students who attend college in their home state.
  9. Research Institutional Scholarships – research what kinds of scholarships are available at the schools that interest you. Check out college websites, catalogs, and financial aid offices for this information.
  10. Find Scholarships related your intended major – Institutional awards can be offered on a university-wide basis, or within a particular college or major. Eligibility for such awards can be based on merit, financial need, intended major, ethnicity, or a variety of other factors.